ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (48)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 18 :
12) Define digital permanence.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (8) 18 :
12) Cite evidence of the positive and negative effects of data permanence on personal and professional digital identity.

[DLIT] (9-12) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Social Media Responsibility
Description:


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: How would you feel?
Description:

This video has teenagers explaining what cyberbullying means.  It also tries to explain why people cyberbully and it has students telling about times when they had been cyberbullyed.




ALEX Learning Activities: 2

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Why More News Sites Are Dumping Their Comment Sections
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/trolling-comments-kqed/the-lowdown-why-more-news-sites-are-dumping-their-comment-sections-lesson-plan/
Description:

Trolling is not new behavior, but why do people do it? And what effects does it have? Trolls tend to antagonize communities in order to amuse themselves and get attention at the expense of others. Trolling has caused some online publications and news organizations to remove comments from their sites due to the effects the comments had on readers’ perceptions of the content, as well as the costs associated with moderating the comments. In this Lowdown lesson, students will analyze the research presented about why people post mean or negative “trolling” comments, as well as evaluate how trolling has affected online communities and reflect on how it should be addressed. This lesson plan will need to be downloaded. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 31 :
25) List common methods of system cybersecurity.

Examples: Various password requirements, two-factor authentication, biometric, geolocation.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: NOVA Cybersecurity Lab Game
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nvcy-sci-cyberlab/nova-cybersecurity-lab/
Description:

Learn how to keep your digital life safe, spot cyber scams, understand the basics of coding, and defend against cyberattacks with the NOVA Cybersecurity Lab. Players assume the role of chief technology officer of a start-up social network company that is the target of increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks. In the game, players must complete challenges to strengthen their defenses and thwart attackers. The lab also features stories of real-world cyber attacks, a glossary of cyber terms, and short animated videos that explain the need for cybersecurity; privacy versus security; cryptography (cyber codes); and what exactly hackers are. This game can be played during a lesson on cybersecurity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 31 :
25) List common methods of system cybersecurity.

Examples: Various password requirements, two-factor authentication, biometric, geolocation.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Cyber Codes
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nvcy-sci-cybercodes/cyber-codes/
Description:

Learn how encryption keeps online information private in this video from the NOVA Cybersecurity Lab. Your messages are coded by email programs and websites to prevent others from reading them. Codes have been used in messages for centuries.  Caesar sent coded messages to his military in ancient Rome. In the 1940s, the Allied forces cracked the German Enigma Code, saving lives during World War II. Today, emails are protected through public-key cryptography, which uses numbers from both the sending and receiving email servers to create a key. However, not all online activity is encrypted and, in some cases, your browsing history, text messages, and data from apps can be intercepted. This video comes with discussion questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 31 :
25) List common methods of system cybersecurity.

Examples: Various password requirements, two-factor authentication, biometric, geolocation.

[DLIT] (8) 30 :
24) Compare and contrast common methods of cybersecurity.

Example: Discuss how password protections and encryption are similar and different.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: NOVA Cybersecurity Lab Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nvcy-doc-cyberlplan/nova-cybersecurity-lab-lesson-plan/
Description:

In this media-rich lesson plan, students explore how to keep their digital lives safe, spot cyber scams, and learn the basics of coding from NOVA Labs. The lesson begins with students watching the Cybersecurity 101 video and discussing the online safety measures that they currently take. Next, students make predictions about online safety best practices, complete the Level 1 challenges of the NOVA Cybersecurity Lab, and compare the best practices from the game with their predictions. Students reconvene for direct instruction on the best practices and key computer science terms and then finish the Cybersecurity Lab game. Finally, students complete the video quizzes with short-response discussion questions and can work on the Cybersecurity stories as homework reading assignments.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/
Description:

Social media is a mixed bag. Being online may increase chances of identity theft and cyberbullying, yet, it’s estimated over 20% of 8 to 12 year-olds have at least one social media account—sometimes without their parents’ knowledge. At times, tweens are taking back charge of their brand, started by their parents since they were born, and sometimes, they are looking to share and connect with a community they have trouble finding face-to-face. So, What’s the right age to start using social media? This resource includes a video and student handout with discussion questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Is the Internet Making You Meaner?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/internet-making-you-meaner-above-the-noise/internet-making-you-meaner-above-the-noise/
Description:

If the Internet's making you feel meaner, you're not imagining it. People really do act differently online than they do in person. Here’s why. According to a paper published in 2004 by psychologist John Suler, there are about 6 main reasons people act differently online. This could explain the rise of internet trolls or why people open up more online than they would in person. A student viewing guide with discussion questions is available to be used with this video. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Screen Time: How Much Is Too Much?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/screen-time-above-the-noise/screen-time-above-the-noise/
Description:

Even by conservative estimates, the average American spends over 6 hours per day staring at a screen. That’s a lot of time. What does the scientific research say about it? Is it good or bad for us? This video comes with a facilitator guide and student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Are Internet Trolls Born or Made?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/internet-trolls-kqed/are-internet-trolls-born-or-made-above-the-noise/
Description:

Trolls are all over the internet, just annoying people to no end. What makes someone an internet troll? Are some people just destined to be a troll, or do they develop this ability? Believe it or not, there have been numerous scientific studies surrounding this behavior. Explore the science behind trolling behavior in the latest Above the Noise video. This video comes with a student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (8 - 12)
Title: Web Junkie: Investigating Internet Addiction
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dc28abfa-c04f-418c-b433-4b60f79f6ecc/investigating-internet-addiction/
Description:

This lesson uses the documentary film Web Junkie as a springboard for a project-based research exercise, assigning students to investigate whether Internet addiction is a problem in their community.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 16 :
10) Explain social engineering, including countermeasures, and its impact on a digital society.

Examples: Phishing, hoaxes, impersonation, baiting, spoofing.

[DLIT] (8) 19 :
13) Evaluate the impact of digital globalization on public perception and ways Internet censorship can affect free and equitable access to information.

[DLIT] (8) 25 :
19) Critique the impacts of censorship as it impacts global society.

Example: Create a presentation outlining the social implications of limiting access to web content by favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 39 :
33) Evaluate the scalability and reliability of networks by describing the relationship between routers, switches, servers, topology, packets, or addressing, as well as the issues that impact network functionality.

Examples: Bandwidth, load, delay.

a. Explain the purpose of Internet Protocol addresses and how domain names are resolved to IP addresses through a Domain Name System server.

b. Understand the need for networking protocols and examples of common protocols.

Examples: HTTP, SMTP, and FTP

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: What Is Net Neutrality and What Will the Internet Look Like Without It?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/net-neutrality-kqed/the-lowdown-what-is-net-neutrality-and-what-will-the-internet-look-like-without-it/
Description:

The policy of net neutrality prevents internet service providers (ISPs), like Verizon and AT&T, from slowing down the loading speeds of certain websites or creating “fast lanes” for sites that pay a fee. This policy will almost certainly be overturned by the Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission. This Lowdown lesson explores the pros and cons of net neutrality and examines the different ways lawmakers view internet service.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Can Hackers Be Heroes?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8721d2e3-c31a-44fa-acdd-2ef1aa18b6a3/can-hackers-be-heroes-off-book/
Description:

PBS's Off Book asks if hacking is inherently good or bad, or if is it an ethical area we have yet to define. Looking beyond the media hype and scare tactics, it is clear that "hacking" is a term that should be up for debate, and that some hackers could actually be heroes and not villains.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Cyber-bullying
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/7d4b3ee9-0856-48f7-85ca-6503140cc22b/7d4b3ee9-0856-48f7-85ca-6503140cc22b/
Description:

Cyber-bullying is where one or more person targets another through technology such as the Internet, cell phones, or other devices to threaten, harass, or embarrass another person. Cyber-bullying goes beyond just bullying because it can follow you home (e.g., through text or e-mail messages, blogs, social networking web site, etc.). You can stop cyber-bullying by not responding to any of it, saving the evidence, and reporting it.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 20 :
14) Analyze the impact of social media on individuals, families, and society.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5 - 12)
Title: Fighting on MySpace
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dgn09.la.rv.visual.elements.fightinms/fighting-on-myspace/
Description:

Social networking sites make it incredibly easy to share your thoughts and aspects of your personality with others. But with this convenience comes the potential for saying something you might regret later. In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "Digital Nation," two groups of girls describe how an exchange of insults over MySpace resulted in a physical fight at their school. This video has discussion questions in the Support Materials section.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 12 :
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Social Studies (10), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Social Media and the Underground Railroad Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/e6ed1ae0-2d29-4853-9a84-1a3227d39196/social-media-and-the-underground-railroad/
Description:

This lesson, to be used with Underground Railroad: The William Still Story, introduces students to the benefits of recording history. However, they also learn the dangers of sharing information publicly. Social media is explored as an effective, but a sometimes dangerous messaging tool.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Life Online
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dgn09.la.rv.visual.elements.salifeonline/life-online/
Description:

In this self-paced lesson, students explore various aspects of online communication. Students watch videos that encourage them to think about their own participation in social networking and to consider how much time they think people should spend online. They also watch videos about the positive and negative aspects of online communication that real young people have experienced. Students then complete an interactive activity to show where they stand on a range of online behaviors. The lesson concludes with a final assignment in which students create a presentation of their ideas about online communication.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: One Boy's Online Tragedy
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dgn09.la.rv.visual.elements.tragedy/one-boys-online-tragedy/
Description:

While some people turn to social networks and texting as an opportunity to open up and be themselves, others are looking for targets. In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "Digital Nation," learn about Ryan Halligan, the victim of a vicious cyberbullying campaign. After Ryan committed suicide, his father, John, went on Ryan's computer to search for answers. As Ryan's friends opened up online to John, he learned about the taunting that his son endured both at school and online. This video comes with discussion questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Is Facial Recognition Invading Your Privacy?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/facial-recognition-software-kqed/is-facial-recognition-invading-your-privacy-above-the-noise/
Description:

Facial recognition is creeping more and more into our daily lives. Facebook and Google use it for auto-tagging photos. Snapchat uses it to create hilarious filters. And Apple’s new iPhone will allow you to use your face to unlock your phone. But this same technology can be used by governments and companies to learn as much as they can about you. Find out how facial recognition technology works in the newest Above the Noise video. This video comes with a student viewing guide.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Can You Trust Influencers on YouTube?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/advertising-youtube-kqed/can-you-trust-influencers-on-youtube-above-the-noise/
Description:

YouTube has been around for over a decade now, and it dominates as the top place for video content. Because of that, it’s way more of a business now than anyone could have imagined. The advertising world refers to many of the stars on YouTube, Instagram, and other social media platforms as influencers, because they have their own, home-grown fanbase that they have been interacting with for years. To capitalize on that fanbase, companies pay these influencers to promote their product or service. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to find out whether you can trust what's on YouTube and what are the rules about influencers advertising products in their videos. This video comes with a student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (8) 33 :
27) Analyze assistive technologies and how they improve the quality of life for users.

Example: Research multiple speech to text technologies and write a persuasive essay in favor of one over another.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: How to Come Up With Your Own Mobile App
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/62fd9efe-5be8-488e-90ef-d3a88779bc4b/toolkit-how-to-come-up-with-your-own-mobile-app/
Description:

Students will learn to see smartphone apps as tools to solve real-world problems. This lesson guides students through a design brainstorm process to invent an app idea related to public art. Students will be designing an app idea to tackle a problem related to public art in their community. All you need is the activity worksheet, some pens, markers, and creativity!

WHY APPS? Well, to start with, they’re everywhere. According to the Pew Research Center, 78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of those own smartphones. Teens don’t have to be limited to the role of the consumer in today’s digital marketplace. All you need is a little know-how and an idea—which is the focus of this curriculum. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Big Data Dilemma
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/the-big-data-dilemma
Description:

Many of us are aware that we're being tracked when going online. It's one of the ways our favorite websites and apps know how to recommend content just for us. But how much information are companies actually collecting? And what are they doing with it? Digging into the details can help us make smart decisions about our online privacy and how to protect it.

Students will be able to:
  • Define online tracking and describe how companies use it.
  • Identify the benefits and drawbacks of online tracking to both companies and users.
  • Analyze specific examples of online tracking and take a position for or against them.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Protecting Online Reputations
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/protecting-online-reputations
Description:

Tagging friends on social media is a great way to connect with others and capture memorable experiences. But what if they don't want to be tagged? Encourage your students to take responsibility for how they may affect the digital footprints of others.

Students will be able to:
  • Define "digital reputation," and identify examples of social media posts that can have a positive or negative effect.
  • Use the 1-2-3-1 Perspectives activity to consider the causes and effects of posting about others online.
  • Generate a list of questions to ask themselves before posting pictures or information about someone else.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 42 :
36) Explain the tradeoffs when selecting and implementing cybersecurity recommendations.

Examples: Two-factor authentication, password requirements, geolocation requirements.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Risk Check for New Tech
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/risk-check-for-new-tech
Description:

New tech, like location services and smart devices, helps make our lives easier and opens opportunities that didn't exist before. But these innovations also come with a cost -- especially to our privacy. Help students consider the benefits and drawbacks of these new technologies -- and decide whether they're ultimately worth it.

Students will be able to:
  • Identify important benefits and privacy risks that new technologies present.
  • Decide whether or not the benefits of new technologies outweigh their privacy risks.
  • Create a compelling video that argues for or against using a new technology.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Curated Lives
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/curated-lives
Description:

Social media gives us a chance to choose how we present ourselves to the world. We can snap and share a picture in the moment or carefully stage photos and select only the ones we think are best. When students reflect on these choices, they can better understand the self they are presenting and the self they aim to be.

Students will be able to:
  • Describe how their curated self may or may not represent their real self.
  • Analyze the benefits and drawbacks of representing different parts of their real self online.
  • Create an avatar that represents both their real and curated selves.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Who's Looking at Your Digital Footprint?
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/whos-looking-at-your-digital-footprint
Description:

Our digital footprints can have a powerful impact on our future. This can be a scary thought, given that what's in our digital footprint isn't always in our control. Teach students that digital footprints are an opportunity to showcase their best selves and craft a footprint that leads to future success.

Students will be able to:
  • Learn that they have a public presence online called a digital footprint.
  • Recognize that any information they post online can help or hurt their future opportunities (college admission, employment, etc.).
  • Create a vignette that shows how a positive digital footprint can help someone take advantage of an opportunity.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Connecting with Digital Audiences
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/connecting-with-digital-audiences
Description:

What you say, and how you say it, often depends on whom you're talking to, both in-person and online. The person or people you're chatting with -- and the apps or websites you're using -- affect how we communicate. Remind your students to consider their audience before they post or comment online, and help them build community and communicate effectively in the digital world.

Students will be able to:
  • Apply the idea of code-switching to how they use phones and other devices in and outside of school.
  • Consider different ways that code-switching online can make communication more meaningful and effective.
  • Write an example post or message that uses code-switching to communicate with an online audience.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Change You Want to See
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/the-change-you-want-to-see
Description:

Research shows that happiness in life is less about what you do and more about why you do it. When your actions have purpose they lead to positive results -- both for you and the world. Help students use the power of the internet to turn their personal passions into positive impact.

Students will be able to:
  • Explain what it means to find your purpose and why it is beneficial.
  • Consider different ways that people have used their digital footprint to make a positive impact on the world and whether you would do something similar.
  • Reflect on what your own purpose might be, including a problem you want to solve and how you might go about solving it.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (9-12) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Is It Fair?
URL: https://newseumed.org/is-it-fair
Description:

In this lesson plan from Newseum, students use a video and graphics to help tune up their “fairness meters” to detect three key factors that can determine how objective or biased a news story is; then they analyze real-life examples.

Accessing this resource requires a free account. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (8) 20 :
14) Analyze current events related to computing and their effects on education, the workplace, individuals, communities, and global society.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (8 - 12)
Title: Search Signals: Understanding Your Top Hits
URL: https://newseumed.org/tools/lesson-plan/search-signals-understanding-your-top-hits
Description:

An infographic and explainer video break down some of the often-invisible ways that search engines —and people — make recommendations; then students hunt for these “search signals” to rank and evaluate real examples.

To access this lesson plan, you will need to create a free account. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Case Study: True Threats or Venting? (2015)
URL: https://newseumed.org/tools/lesson-plan/case-study-true-threats-or-venting-2015
Description:

Students will review a court case and case study to determine what is protected and what may not be. 

Elonis v. the United States provides the foundation for a debate on what forms of expression on social media are and are not protected by the First Amendment — and the blurry line in-between.

To access this free resource, you will need a free account. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Your Information Footprint is Larger Than You Think
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-1-youre-leaving-footprints/
Description:

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Your information is larger than you think”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student lesson is available at https://teachingprivacy.org/youre-leaving-footprints/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their online and offline activities contribute to their information “footprint”; students can use privacy settings and critical thinking skills to limit the exposure of their footprint.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Students can give examples of ways their online and offline activities generate digital footprints, within each of the following broad categories: intentional posting/online activities, metadata attached to posts, information transmitted by devices, and others collecting or posting information about them.
  2. For at least one example of an activity that generates digital footprints, students can explain (at least in non-technical terms) how that activity generates those footprints.
  3. Students can enumerate some factors that affect how many people or entities can see the data in their information footprint, including (minimally) privacy settings and third-party data sharing, and give examples of potential negative consequences of exposure.
  4. Students can explain how the amount of information available about them, and how many people have access to it, is affected by the mining of data from different sources to form a picture of each person and can give examples of inferences that can be drawn by data-mining.
  5. Students can give examples of available privacy settings for apps, online services, and devices they use frequently, and explain why they would choose particular settings based on their information-sharing preferences.
  6. Students can suggest some potential uses apps and online services might have for particular types of personal data they typically request access to and evaluate whether those uses would likely be beneficial, neutral, or harmful to the student.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: There’s No Anonymity
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-2-theres-no-anonymity/
Description:

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “There is no anonymity on the Internet”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/theres-no-anonymity/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain (in general terms) how data tracked by online services can be used to identify them; students can use tools and techniques to reduce the effectiveness of tracking.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning objectives:

  1. Students can explain (in general terms) how data aggregation, data mining, and inference are carried out and can give examples of how these techniques can be used to match “anonymous” users to their real identities.
  2. Students can explain what online behavioral tracking is, can give examples of what types of information can be gathered about them, and can give examples of how personal devices can be used to track and collect that information.
  3. Students can give examples of what types of information can still be collected by websites when they are using their browser’s “private browsing” or “incognito” mode.
  4. Students can explain how the amount and type of information available about them online affects the likelihood that someone can connect their online personas with their offline identities.
  5. Students can give examples of effective tools and techniques that reduce the ability of websites, apps, and services to track their online behavior, explain (in general terms) how they work, and enumerate some of their limitations.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Information is Valuable
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-3-information-is-valuable/
Description:

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Information about you on the Internet will be used by somebody in their interest — including against you”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/information-is-valuable/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can give examples of how their data may be used to benefit others; students can investigate and evaluate how different online services use data, in order to make informed choices.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Students can give examples of personal data that services or sites may share with other services or companies, and examples of how those “third parties” may use that data. Examples should include both information they explicitly post and supposedly hidden information.
  2. Students can give examples of how having their personal data might benefit any of the following: friends/family, acquaintances, businesses, institutions, governments, and cybercriminals.
  3. Students can explain the business model that allows companies that provide free or cheap online services to make money by selling consumer data to advertisers and/or data brokers.
  4. Students can explain the difference between “opt-in” and “opt-out” models for information sharing, and relate those models to the lack of comprehensive laws regulating data sharing by companies, institutions, or governments.
  5. Student can investigate how online services use data and who they share it with, and explain how they would use this information in choosing which services to use and which data to give those services access to.
  6. Students can identify potential consequences of choosing particular privacy settings on apps, sites, and devices, in terms of how their data could be used by the parties who can see it — and whether those uses would likely be beneficial, neutral, or detrimental to themselves.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 19 :
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

[DLIT] (9-12) 35 :
29) Summarize the role of compression and encryption in modifying the structure of digital artifacts and the varieties of information carried in the metadata of these artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 36 :
30) Evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.

Examples: Client server, peer-to-peer, cloud computing.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Someone Could Listen
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-4-someone-could-listen/
Description:

Unencrypted communication over the Internet works a lot like sending a postcard: it can be read by anybody along the delivery route. Communication is routed through intermediary computers and systems, which are connected to many more computers and systems. Encryption, or encoding information so it appears scrambled to anyone who doesn’t know the key, is a way to wrap a postcard in an envelope. While it can never be 100% secure, stronger encryption makes it harder for people to get to the contents.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Communication over a network, unless strongly encrypted, is never just between two parties”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/someone-could-listen/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate how the multi-step, multi-party pathways of networked communication affect users’ privacy; students can identify and use more secure communication options.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can describe how intermediary devices, and the services that provide them, are involved in transmitting information from point A to point B on the Internet.
  2. Students can explain how the interconnected, many-layered structure of the Internet affects the security and privacy of online communication.
  3. Students can identify the difference between a private network and a shared network and can describe some of the potential risks of using a shared network.
  4. Students can describe how encryption decreases the chances of outside parties infiltrating private communications and accessing private information.
  5. Students can explain why their security depends (in part) on their own decisions and behavior.
  6. Students can give some examples of common encryption protocols, identify what layer of an electronic communication each of those protocols protects, and describe how they would verify that those protocols were being used.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Sharing Releases Control
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-5-sharing-releases-control/
Description:

Any time you interact online, that information is recorded in the network. And, as with in-person communication, once you’ve shared something, you can’t control what happens to it — or how people will interpret it. Other people can repost or forward content to any audience without your permission, websites can sell information to other businesses, and data can be legally subpoenaed. Websites and search engines automatically pick up and duplicate content, making it impossible to “unshare” — the Internet never forgets!

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Sharing information over a network means you give up control over that information — forever”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/sharing-releases-control/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their information may be recorded, re-shared, and reinterpreted once it is online; students can use privacy settings and imaginative self-inquiry to limit potentially harmful sharing.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can explain that once any type of content is shared online, it can be instantly available to anyone. As a result, students can make more informed decisions about the type of content they choose to share.
  2. Students can list examples and elaborate on ways in which shared content may be stored online forever, disseminated, and potentially used to harm them.
  3. Students can list some factors that might lead to an online communication being misinterpreted.
  4. Before sharing a piece of information online, students can imagine potential negative consequences of that information becoming public knowledge.
  5. Students are aware of privacy settings, can explain what they do, and can apply these skills to aid them in better controlling what information they release and to whom.
  6. Students are able to articulate how their behavior significantly affects the privacy of others, and can apply this knowledge by asking others about unspoken sharing preferences.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Search Is Improving
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-6-search-is-improving/
Description:

Every day more data is being put online. Search engines are getting better, allowing “deeper” the searching of more types of data. Techniques for extracting and connecting information from different sources are getting more powerful. Furthermore, information that is not retrievable today may be retrievable tomorrow due to changes in terms of service, public policy, law, and technical privacy settings.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Just because something can’t be found today, doesn’t mean it can’t be found tomorrow.” They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/search-is-improving/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain how changes in technology and regulations can affect who has access to their data; students can use techniques to monitor and limit the exposure of their data.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students can describe (in general terms) how a search engine works, including that results are constantly being refreshed to include new information and that the search engine itself is continually updated to deal with newer types of information.
  2. Students can provide examples of offline data that can be digitized and put online.
  3. Students can give example scenarios describing how changes to laws and regulations could affect the availability of personal information.
  4. Students can briefly summarize the purpose of privacy policies and the effects that their ever-changing nature has on users’ privacy.
  5. Students can investigate what information about them is available online, and assess which types of information — social, financial, etc. — are currently available to different entities.
  6. Students can monitor changes in privacy policies and default privacy settings and evaluate how those changes might affect who can see what information about them.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Online Is Real
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-7-online-is-real/
Description:

Your online activities and communications are as much a part of your life as your offline activities and communications; they are interconnected and can affect your life and relationships in the same way.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle: “The online world is inseparable from the ‘real’ world”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/online-is-real/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can give examples of how online and offline activities affect each other; students can think imaginatively about the potential consequences of their posts for themselves and others.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students can critically examine the relationship between online and offline activities. They can outline example scenarios in which information originating online could affect their offline interactions and vice versa.
  2. Students can explain how their online presence (both their intentional posts and other parts of their information footprint) might have a larger audience than that of which they are aware, and give examples of who might be in that larger audience.
  3. Students can identify privacy settings on a particular app or site they use regularly and edit their settings according to their preferences.
  4. Students can explain how interacting with privacy settings allows them to minimize who can see their personal information and posts.
  5. Students reflect on the content that they choose to post, and can discuss the impact a post might have, or the reaction it might evoke, in a greater offline audience — not just within their circle of friends or followers.
  6. Students can describe how they might approach a friend or family member to discuss privacy preferences.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Identity Isn’t Guaranteed
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-8-identity-isnt-guaranteed/
Description:

Creating an identity on the Internet or impersonating somebody else is often just a matter of a few clicks. Currently, there is no foolproof way to match a real person with their online identity. This means that you can never be sure with whom you are communicating and that someone could steal your online identity and impersonate you!

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle: “Identity is not guaranteed on the Internet”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/identity-isnt-guaranteed/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain why it is difficult to be sure who one is communicating with online; students can investigate and evaluate the legitimacy of services that want their personal information.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can give examples of potential consequences of disclosing information online if the entity they’re sharing it with isn’t who they say they are.
  2. Students can give examples of “weak points” that might allow someone to steal their identity, and examples of what that person could do with the stolen identity to compromise their privacy.
  3. Students can explain how “phishing” works, and describe how they should respond to messages they suspect of phishing.
  4. Students can give examples of methods they could use to verify someone’s identity online and can explain the shortcomings of those methods.
  5. Students can give examples of methods they could use to verify the authenticity of apps, sites, and services that request their personal information, and can explain the shortcomings of those methods.
  6. Students can describe some of the basic precautions they can take to keep their accounts secure from hackers and identity thieves.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: You Can’t Escape
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-9-you-cant-escape/
Description:

Even if you’re not actively using the Internet, someone else may be sharing information about you — intentionally or unintentionally. So, avoiding the Internet does not guarantee privacy.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle: “You can’t avoid having an information footprint by not going online”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/you-cant-escape/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their offline activities generate data that is stored and shared online; students can communicate effectively with others about everyone’s information-sharing preferences.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students can explain why abstaining from online activities is not an effective strategy for maintaining online privacy.
  2. Students can give examples of how someone’s information footprint could be impacted by the online activities of others, including how information about someone’s offline activities might end up online.
  3. Students can give examples of ways that information in someone’s digital footprint that was not created by them could still be used against them.
  4. Students can describe how they would apply privacy tools provided on social networking sites to minimize unwanted posts by others about their activities.
  5. Students can investigate what information is being shared about them online by devices and services they use and organizations they participate in, and use privacy settings or opt-out mechanisms to limit that sharing.
  6. Students can describe how they would approach discussing their privacy preferences with their friends and family to minimize unwanted information-sharing.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Privacy Requires Work
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-10-privacy-requires-work/
Description:

Most Internet technology is not designed to protect the privacy of those who use it; in fact, most technology providers make money by leveraging your private information. “Privacy policies” are generally written to protect those providers from lawsuits, not to protect users’ privacy. Laws and regulations cover only certain aspects of privacy and vary from place to place — and enforcement is even more varied. So, like it or not, your privacy is your own responsibility and requires your constant attention.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle: “Only you have an interest in maintaining your privacy”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/privacy-requires-work/. 

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate why technology design, laws, and business policies do not inherently protect their privacy; students have the capacity to acquire new privacy-management skills as technology and policies change.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students can describe the user’s personal role in protecting their own online privacy.
  2. Students can explain the purpose of a privacy policy.
  3. Students can describe some of the limitations of privacy policies.
  4. Students can describe some limitations of the laws protecting privacy.
  5. Students can explain why it is important to periodically check privacy settings.
  6. Students can give examples of effective actions they can take towards improving online privacy protections in general, including actions that can affect business practices and government regulations.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 18 :
12) Explain the different forms of web advertising and why websites, digital resources, and artifacts may include advertisements that may collect personal information.

Examples: personalized web experiences based on tailored web searches, maintaining search history, quicker access to relevant information.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5 - 12)
Title: What’s the Big Deal About Internet Privacy?
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/lesson/whats-the-big-deal-about-internet-privacy-9-12
Description:

Students explore the concept of privacy in their everyday lives, and as it relates to using the Internet. Students examine a scenario in which a research company collects information about them. They reflect on concerns they might have, and they learn about the kinds of information websites collect. They learn that sites are required to post their privacy policies and that kids should check those policies on the sites they visit.

Students will be able to:

• explore the concept of privacy in both a real-world setting and online.

• understand how and why companies collect information about visitors to their websites.

• learn and use online privacy terms.

• learn that websites are required to post privacy policies.

 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Privacy Dilemma
URL: http://mediasmarts.ca/sites/mediasmarts/files/pdfs/lesson-plan/Lesson_Privacy_Dilemma.pdf
Description:

In this lesson, students consider and discuss the trade-offs we all make on a daily basis between maintaining our privacy and gaining access to information services. The lesson begins with a series of guided questions to help students assess their own perceptions of privacy and determine their comfort levels with giving out personal information. This is followed by a series of exercises and case studies that encourage them to delve deeper into privacy issues. As a summative activity, students produce short video essays that reflect those privacy issues they consider to be important.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Privacy, the Internet and that Phone in Your Pocket
URL: https://ccla.org/cclanewsite/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/CCLET-Privacy-Lesson-Plan.pdf
Description:

This lesson is intended to introduce students to the concept of privacy rights as guaranteed in section 8 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which provides that everyone has the right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure. In light of society’s ever-increasing reliance on electronic devices to store and share personal information, this lesson will focus on privacy rights as they relate to information on cell phones, computers, and social media in a variety of contexts.

Specific Student Learning Objectives:

 Students will develop an understanding of privacy rights and why a guarantee of privacy is necessary for free and democratic societies (Students will consider the question if you have nothing to hide, why should you care about privacy?).

 Students will demonstrate an ability to identify and consider competing interests when determining the reasonableness of a search of private information.

Some wording may need to be altered, as some are written in formal English, not American English. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

[DLIT] (8) 18 :
12) Cite evidence of the positive and negative effects of data permanence on personal and professional digital identity.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Life Online
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dgn09.la.rv.visual.elements.salifeonline/life-online/
Description:

Can you imagine a world without cell phones or the Internet? Today, the average teen sends more than 1,700 texts per month. Nearly 90 percent of young Americans are connected to the Internet, and many spend hours online every day. The number of social network subscribers now exceeds the population of most countries.

It's clear that digital technology is revolutionizing the way we connect to one another, making it faster and easier than ever. This can affect not only what we say and how we say it, but also who hears the message and how they respond to it. 

While this resource requires an account to save your work, it is not necessary to view resources. It is my recommendation that the questions in the lesson be used as talking points, discussion questions, journal entries, or written on paper and turned in. 

Students and teachers can create a free account at Alabama Public Television / PBS Learning Media. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: The Daily Dilemma: David
URL: https://www.goodcharacter.com/dilemma29/
Description:

This website provides a case study for student evaluation, either through writing or discussion. This case study will focus on the safe use of digital devices and ethical sharing. The case study is as follows: David has just joined a Facebook group and he discovers that somebody has posted an offensive and malicious photo of a girl from his class. David feels very uncomfortable about it. What, if anything, should he do?



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 4 Chapter 1 Lesson 5: Identifying People With Data
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit4/5/
Description:

Students begin this lesson by investigating some of the world’s biggest data breaches to get a sense for how frequently data breaches happen within companies and organizations, and what kinds of data and information is lost or given up. Afterward, students will use the Data Privacy Lab tool to investigate just how easily they could be uniquely identified with a few seemingly innocuous pieces of information. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will research themselves online to determine just how much someone could learn about them by conducting the same searches and “connecting the dots.”

Students will be able to:
- explain privacy concerns that arise through the mass collection of data.
- use online search tools to find and connect information about a person or topic of interest.
- explain how multiple sources of data can be combined in order to uncover new knowledge or information.
- analyze the personal privacy and security concerns that arise with any use of computational systems.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 4 Chapter 1 Lesson 6: The Cost of Free
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit4/6/
Description:

This lesson focuses on the economic and consumer concerns around apps and websites that collect and track data about you in exchange for providing you a service free of cost. Often the quality of the service itself is dependent on having access to data about many people and their behavior. The main takeaway of the lesson is that students should be more informed consumers of the technology around them. They should be able to explain some of the trade-offs between maintaining personal privacy and using innovative software free of cost.

Students will be able to:
- explain how and why personal data is exchanged for the use of free software.
- explain some of the privacy and economic tradeoffs involved in the collection and use of personal data.
- describe the ways and reasons organizations collect information about individuals.
- read and critically evaluate a data privacy policy.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 19 :
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 4 Chapter 1 Lesson 10: Rapid Research - Cybercrime
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit4/10/
Description:

Students learn about various types of cybercrimes and the cybersecurity measures that can help prevent them. Then students perform a Rapid Research project investigating a particular cybercrime event with a focus on the data that was lost or stolen and the concerns that arise as a result. The Rapid Research activity features vocabulary, concepts, and skills that should help prepare them for the AP Explore PT, and also serves as a capstone for the sequence of lessons on encryption and security.

Students will be able to:
- explain the characteristics of a phishing attack.
- explain how a DDoS attack works.
- describe how one computer virus works.
- research and describe a cyber attack found in the news.
- reason about the threats posed by, and methods of recourse for, various types of cyber attacks.
- describe plausible storage, security, or privacy concerns for particular pieces of data.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 19 :
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 4 Chapter 1 Optional Lesson: Practice PT - Big Data and Cybersecurity Dilemmas
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit4/10/optional/13/
Description:

To conclude their study of big data and cryptography, students will complete a small research project related to a dilemma presented by Big Data or Cybersecurity, in the form of a Practice Performance Task. Students will pick one of two issues to research more deeply - either an issue related to big data, or one related to cybersecurity. Students will need to identify appropriate online resources to learn about the functionality, context, and impact of the technological innovation that gave rise to the dilemma they are investigating. After completing their research, students will present their findings both in a written summary and with an audio/visual artifact they found online. The written components students must complete are similar to those students will see in the AP Performance Tasks.

This project is an opportunity to practice many of the skills students will use when completing the Explore Performance Task on the AP® Exam at the end of the year. While an open-ended research project might be intimidating, students have built all the skills they need to complete this task.

Note: This is NOT the official AP® Performance Task that will be submitted as part of the Advanced Placement exam; it is a practice activity intended to prepare students for some portions of their individual performance at a later time.

Students will be able to:
- identify reliable and authoritative sources of information about computing information.
- synthesize information taken from multiple online sources to create a cohesive description of a computing innovation.
- identify an artifact that clarifies an aspect of a computing topic not easily captured in writing.
- explain both the beneficial and harmful effects related to a modern social dilemma in computing.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 48

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