ALEX Resources

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Classroom Resources (10)


ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (4) 13 :
4.4.2) Describe the various types of bullying and effects on the victim.

Examples: types -through social media; effects--depression, suicide, eating disorders

[HE] (4) 16 :
4.4.5) Describe how to avoid dangerous situations involving strangers and Internet safety.

Example: refusing to go alone to meet online acquaintances

[HE] (5) 16 :
5.4.5) Apply the practice of keeping personal information private while online.

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (6) 11 :
6.3.1) Analyze the validity of a variety of Internet sources for health information.

Examples: valid sites -.edu (education), .org (non-profit), or .gov (government); unreliable health information sites - .com (commercial)

a. Identify local resources for reliable health information.

Examples: public health agencies, school nurse, health education teacher

Subject: Health Education (4 - 6)
Title: Be Internet Awesome: Digital Safety and Citizenship Curriculum
URL: https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-interland.appspot.com/en-us/hub/pdfs/2021/BIA_Curriculum_June-2021_EN_PDF-Version.pdf
Description:

Teachers and parents understand how digital mistakes can hurt feelings, reputations, and privacy. But it can be harder to convince kids that a seemingly harmless post today could be misunderstood tomorrow—let alone in the future and by people, they never thought would see it. These activities use concrete examples and thought‑provoking discussions to teach young learners how to maintain a positive online presence and protect their privacy.

This resource is a 139-page unit plan with materials, scenarios, and conversation starters focused on digital safety. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [PE] AK1 (9-12) 15 :
AK-5.3) Identify how social interaction influences their own nutrition and physical activity choices, and how they respond based on the social situation.

Examples: peer pressure, social media, advertisements

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (7) 22 :
7.8.1) Create ways to influence and support others in making positive health choices.

Examples: using social media campaigns, YouTube live campaign, posters; addressing local school board with the need for quality physical education and healthier food choices

[HE] HED (9-12) 10 :
HE.2.3) Analyze how the perceptions of norms influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: addressing topics such as wearing safety equipment, teen pregnancy, drug abuse, suicide, cyber-bullying, weight management, potentially dangerous social media trends

[HE] HA (10-12) 5 :
HA.5.1) Identify decision-making skills used in situations that put adolescents and teens at risk.

Examples: recording a fight and posting it on a social media; seeing a friend smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol; hearing a friend talk about shoplifting; hearing plans about a weekend party that will include drugs and/or alcohol; pressure to have sexual relations

a. Identify consequences of making poor decisions to join in or ignore risky situations.

b. Recognize the differences between situations in which one has control vs. a lack of control.

c. Review the importance of successfully managing decision-making skills when confronted with uncomfortable, risky, or dangerous situations.

Subject: Physical Education (9 - 12), Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: Social Media for Students
URL: https://nfhslearn.com/courses/social-media-for-students
Description:

Social Media for Students has been designed to give students the information that they need to develop responsible social media habits.  This course illustrates the long-term consequences that irresponsible social media usage can have on a student’s educational, athletic, and professional careers.  It shows students ways in which they can use social media to promote their team, school, community, and their own personal brand.  Social media has turned every user into a mass communicator.  Learning how to skillfully and safely utilize it now, will greatly help you as you continue to use social media in the future.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (4) 11 :
4.3.2) Compare health-related advertisements regarding "truth in advertising."

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (6) 23 :
6.8.2) Identify ways by which health messages can be altered to appeal to different audiences.

Example: modifying a snack advertisement to target children, teenagers, or adults

Subject: Health Education (4 - 6)
Title: Marketing Mania
URL: https://healthpoweredkids.org/lessons/marketing-mania/
Description:

This lesson helps young people discover “tricks of the trade” in food and beverage marketing. They practice comparing the messages conveyed through advertisements with the nutrition information available about different products.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (5) 9 :
5.2.2) Describe ways that technology can influence personal health.

Example: step tracker device, heart rate monitor, blood sugar monitor

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (8) 8 :
8.2.3) Analyze the influences of technology on personal and family health.

Examples: screen time, video game addictions, activity trackers, diabetes monitor, heart monitor, fitness assessment tools

Subject: Health Education (5 - 8)
Title: Analyzing Influences on Health
URL: https://www.warrencountyschools.org/userfiles/2798/Classes/16329/lesson04.pdf
Description:

The influence of media can be strong. It's important to have the skills to analyze these messages. This is a lesson to help students navigate media and technology. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (8) 2 :
8.1.2) Analyze how the environment, family history, personal behaviors, and health care can affect individual healthful living.

a. Describe ways to reduce or prevent injuries and illness in adolescents as it pertains to family history, personal behaviors, and health care.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 8)
Title: Environmental Justice: Opposing a Toxic Waste Incinerator
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/envh10.sci.life.eco.enhdiscrim/environmental-justice-opposing-a-toxic-waste-incinerator/
Description:

Learn how farm workers and owners formed a rare alliance in an effort to block the use of an incinerator in their Latino community by suing for environmental discrimination in this video segment adapted from Earthkeeping: "Toxic Racism." Learn about the rural town of Kettleman City, California, where one of the country's largest hazardous waste landfills is located. Hear how farmworkers and farm owners joined together to sue the waste management corporation for environmental discrimination against poor and minority communities. In addition, learn about environmental law principles that led to a ruling in favor of the citizens.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (1) 2 :
1.1.2) List food safety precautions.

[HE] (5) 8 :
5.2.1) Describe how the school and community can support personal health practices and behaviors.

a. Describe how positive and negative influences from family, peers, and culture affect adolescents' body acceptance during the changes of puberty.

[HE] (5) 11 :
5.3.2) Research factors to consider when selecting health products.

Examples: cost, safety, effectiveness, side effects

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (6) 20 :
6.7.1) Critique examples of responsible behaviors that reduce health risks.

Examples: choosing healthy foods, participating in healthy activities, having regular medical and dental check-ups

Subject: Health Education (1 - 6)
Title: The Trouble With Chicken: Food Safety Standards
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fln33-soc-twcstandards/frontline-the-trouble-with-chicken-food-safety-standards/
Description:

Explore the reasons behind the 2011 recall of ground turkey by the meat-packing company Cargill Foods in Springdale, AK, and the implications on our food safety, in this video excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Chicken. Noticing high levels of salmonella in its ground turkey, Cargill Foods eventually recalled its product, but the delay still sickened 132 people and killed one person.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 16 :
16 ) Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text. [RI.6.6]

[HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

Subject: English Language Arts (6), Health Education (6)
Title: Critical Viewing: Cigarette Ads
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b9212b88-b3bb-4e76-87e5-43b3d33395ea/b9212b88-b3bb-4e76-87e5-43b3d33395ea/
Description:

Students will analyze four different cigarette ads to understand the meaning of critical viewing and active viewing. They have an opportunity to study the elements— in this case, an advertisement for tobacco, and consider a series of questions, each designed to elicit important clues and information. This interactive learning activity can be used during a lesson on how social media influences health behaviors or when studying author's purpose.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (6) 11 :
6.3.1) Analyze the validity of a variety of Internet sources for health information.

Examples: valid sites -.edu (education), .org (non-profit), or .gov (government); unreliable health information sites - .com (commercial)

a. Identify local resources for reliable health information.

Examples: public health agencies, school nurse, health education teacher

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 22 :
7.8.1) Create ways to influence and support others in making positive health choices.

Examples: using social media campaigns, YouTube live campaign, posters; addressing local school board with the need for quality physical education and healthier food choices

[HE] (8) 8 :
8.2.3) Analyze the influences of technology on personal and family health.

Examples: screen time, video game addictions, activity trackers, diabetes monitor, heart monitor, fitness assessment tools

Subject: Health Education (6 - 8)
Title: Digital Wellness and Safety
URL: https://everfi.com/offerings/listing/ignition-digital-literacy-relaunched/
Description:

Ignition: Digital Wellness and Safety is a digital literacy curriculum designed to provide students with the information literacy skills they need to safely and confidently navigate the digital world.  

These six digital responsibility lessons encourage students to take practical steps to protect their own privacy and safety online, while also teaching them how to evaluate content for accuracy, perspective, and motive. Ignition helps students acknowledge the benefits of digital communities and resources while guiding them to successfully navigate potential pitfalls in their digital lives.

This alignment results from the ALEX Health/PE COS Resource Alignment Summit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: Body Image and Media
URL: https://www.cdc.gov/bam/teachers/body-image-ads.html
Description:

Students take a quick oral quiz on television, advertising, and body image. Then they use an “Ad Decoder” (critical questions) to examine advertisements that are aimed at them. They also discuss how messages about body image can affect health.

This alignment results from the ALEX Health/PE COS Resource Alignment Summit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 8 :
6.2.3) Investigate how messages from media influence health behaviors.

Examples: social media, fast food advertisements, editing photos to enhance physical appearance

[HE] (6) 18 :
6.6.1) Assess personal health practices.

Examples: food choices, physical activity, hygiene

[HE] (7) 20 :
7.7.1) State the importance of assuming responsibility for personal health behaviors and avoiding risky behaviors.

Examples: fast food vs. My Plate recommendations, screen time vs. active living

[HE] (7) 22 :
7.8.1) Create ways to influence and support others in making positive health choices.

Examples: using social media campaigns, YouTube live campaign, posters; addressing local school board with the need for quality physical education and healthier food choices

Subject: Health Education (6 - 7)
Title: Food Labels
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/midlit11.math.splprop/ratio-and-proportional-reasoning-food-labels/
Description:

In this blended lesson supporting literacy skills, students watch videos and complete interactive activities to learn how to use fractions to interpret food labels and make healthy eating choices. Students develop their literacy skills as they explore a mathematics focus on proportional reasoning. During this process, they read informational text, learn and practice vocabulary words, and explore content through videos and interactive activities

This alignment results from the ALEX Health/PE COS Resource Alignment Summit.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 10

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