ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (4) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill.


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 30 :
30 ) With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.1.8]

[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[SC2015] (1) 2 :
2 ) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

Subject: English Language Arts (1), or Mathematics (1), or Science (1)
Title: Light and Sight – Why We Need Light to See
Description:

In this lesson, students will investigate objects’ appearance in varying levels of light to help them construct an explanation that objects can only be seen when light is available to illuminate them. Students will discuss why objects look different in a dark room and graph their preferences for sleeping with a light on or off. Then, they will investigate how an object’s appearance changes in different lighting conditions in small group centers. Finally, they will model the moon’s path around the sun to see how light from the sun causes the moon’s appearance to change as it orbits Earth. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will use their experiences as evidence to explain that light is essential for sight.

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.

 




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.

[MA2019] (3) 19 :
19. Estimate and measure liquid volumes and masses of objects using liters (l), grams (g), and kilograms (kg).

a. Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes given in the same metric units.
[MA2019] (0) 17 :
17. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common to see which object has "more of" or "less of" the attribute and describe the difference.

Example: Directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as "taller" or "shorter."
[MA2019] (0) 15 :
15. Classify objects into given categories of 10 or fewer; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

a. Categorize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.
[MA2019] (1) 18 :
18. Determine the length of an object using non-standard units with no gaps or overlaps, expressing the length of the object with a whole number.
[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[MA2019] (2) 17 :
17. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using standard units of measurement shown on rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes.
[MA2019] (2) 20 :
20. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference of the two objects using standard units of length.
[MA2019] (2) 15 :
15. Measure lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit.

a. Create a line plot where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units to show the lengths of several measured objects.
[MA2019] (2) 16 :
16. Create a picture graph and bar graph to represent data with up to four categories.

a. Using information presented in a bar graph, solve simple "put-together," "take-apart," and "compare" problems.

b. Using Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts, analyze data to predict an outcome.
Subject: Mathematics (K - 3), or Science (2)
Title: What do Plants Need?
Description:

In this lesson, students will understand that in order to grow healthy plants, soil, water, light, and air must be provided. Students will use math skills such as measurement and science process skills such as observation, comparing, and recording data.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (1) 19 :
19. Tell and write time to the hours and half hours using analog and digital clocks.
[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: Mathematics (1), or Science (1)
Title: The Changing Sun
Description:

Students will observe the changes of the sun over the course of a day and then over a 4 month period. Students will document these changes and then graph them. Finally, students will see the relationship between the patterns of the sun and the effect the pattern has on our daily lives. 

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Obtain information from literature and other media to illustrate that there are many different kinds of living things and that they exist in different places on land and in water (e.g., woodland, tundra, desert, rainforest, ocean, river).

[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
Subject: Mathematics (1), or Science (2)
Title: Spiders: Are They Scary or Nice?
Description:

Children often do not understand spiders because spiders look scary. In this lesson, students will graph spider preferences and record observations of spiders in a natural habitat. Students will research spider information using the Internet. Students will illustrate a vivarium for a spider habitat, including  five environmental characteristics. 

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 21 :
15) Interpret data displayed in a chart.

Example: Using charts which depict data students interpret the data either verbally or in written form (which has more, less, are equal).

[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1), Mathematics (1), Science (1)
Title: Not Enough Hours in the Day? Daylight Data Collection
Description:

Students and teacher collaboratively collect and organize data on the length of days throughout the year and analyze patterns that they see. Students and teacher will create a digital spreadsheet and a connected chart in order to reflect and make observations while analyzing the data represented in chart format.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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