ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (3) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. [W.3.7]

[ELA2015] (3) 29 :
29 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. [W.3.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.3.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.3.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.3.1b]

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.3.1c]

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.3.1d]

[ELA2015] (3) 34 :
34 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.3.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. [W.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5), Social Studies (4 - 5)
Title: Storytelling in the Social Studies Classroom
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/storytelling-social-studies-classroom-928.html
Description:

In this unit, students tell their own stories and explore the stories of other Americans. Hearing and telling these stories helps students realize that social studies is not simply the study of history, but an exploration of real people and their lives. Students begin by telling stories about their personal experiences. They then explore the character traits that promote democratic ideals and tell stories about family members who exemplify these traits. Finally, they conduct research and share stories about famous Americans. Practiced skills include reading, researching, visually representing, writing, and presenting.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.3.10]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.4.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. [RL.5.2]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 33 :
33 ) Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. [SL.5.2]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5)
Title: Daily Book Boosts
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/daily-book-boosts-64.html
Description:

Each day at the end of their independent reading time, students give Book Boosts, one-minute raves about books they've read. Students select a book that they really enjoyed and then give a one-minute talk that generates interest in the book but does not give away the book's ending. Students can boost their books in a variety of ways, including creating alternate book covers, designing posters or flyers, or making promotional bookmarks. Have students take turns giving book boosts with two students giving a Book Boost each class day. These Book Boosts are easy ways to suggest a multitude of titles to students, and they act as a way for students to have something to think about as they read.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. [RL.3.3]

[ELA2015] (3) 7 :
7 ) Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). [RL.3.7]

[ELA2015] (3) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.3.3]

a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.3.3a]

b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. [W.3.3b]

c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. [W.3.3c]

d. Provide a sense of closure. [W.3.3d]

[ELA2015] (3) 40 :
40 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.3.4]

a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.3.4a]

b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is added to a known word (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable, comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat). [L.3.4b]

c. Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., company, companion). [L.3.4c]

d. Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. [L.3.4d]

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[ELA2015] (4) 3 :
3 ) Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). [RL.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 7 :
7 ) Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. [RL.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.4.10]

[ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[ELA2015] (4) 41 :
41 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.4.4]

a. Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.4.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph). [L.4.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. [L.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 1 :
1 ) Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.5.1]

[ELA2015] (5) 7 :
7 ) Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). [RL.5.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.5.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.5.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.5.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.5.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.5.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.5.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.5.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. [W.5.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.5.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.5.3e]

[ELA2015] (5) 41 :
41 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.5.4]

a. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.5.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis). [L.5.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. [L.5.4c]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5)
Title: Gabbing About Garfield: Conversing About Texts With Comic Creator
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/gabbing-about-garfield-conversing-1056.html
Description:

With many of your students probably familiar with comics and Manga, this lesson offers the perfect chance to get students to think critically about the comics they see in the paper every day. Students begin the lesson by playing an online game that requires them to sequence Garfield comics and answer questions about the strips. Each round has three questions targeted to specific skills: comprehension, vocabulary building, and drawing inferences. Then, students are introduced to the features and conventions of comics and examine how the Garfield strips use these comic conventions. Students work in pairs to conduct a written conversation about Garfield comics and record their conversations using the interactive Comic Creator, incorporating features of the comic strip genre into their original texts.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.3.10]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.4.10]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.5.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.5.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.5.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.5.4c]

[DLIT] (3) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 5)
Title: Reading Idol! Bringing Readers Theatre Center Stage in Your Classroom
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/reading-idol-bringing-readers-30621.html
Description:

Students have an opportunity to create an outstanding Readers Theatre performance within groups to compete for the title of Reading Idol. Students are given scripts to practice their roles within Readers Theatre. Throughout the week, groups practice repeatedly until the performance day. On the performance day, students take turns performing and evaluating their own work and the performances of other groups before voting on a winning performance. All groups are required to create a podcast of their performance. The Reading Idol winners are also recorded by video and uploaded to the teacher's website for others to view.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.3.10]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (3) 32 :
32 ) Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. [SL.3.2]

[ELA2015] (3) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them). [L.3.6]

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.5.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.5.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.5.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.5.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 43 :
43 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition). [L.5.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5)
Title: What If We Changed the Book? Problem-Posing With Sixteen Cows
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/what-changed-book-problem-815.html
Description:

A piece of math-related children's literature, Sixteen Cows, is used to demonstrate the strategy of problem-posing. After hearing the story read aloud, students are invited to brainstorm some literary and mathematical observations to the story. With the teacher's guidance, students then turn those observations into "what-if" mathematical extensions. These extensions become mathematical problems that students solve, both individually and as a whole class. Since this strategy highlights changing attributes of a story, it underscores for children the range of choices that authors have.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 5

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