ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 6 :
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

Subject: Social Studies (K - 2)
Title: Suki’s Bone | MOLLY OF DENALI™
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mod19-soc-sukisbone/sukis-bone-molly-of-denali/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students discover what happens when Molly's dog, Suki, finds a bone with beautiful markings on it in the 11-minute animated story “Suki's Bone” from the PBS KIDS series MOLLY OF DENALI™. (Move the cursor over the video progress bar to locate the story at 01:00.) After Grandpa Nat's archeologist friend confirms that the bone is an important Alaska Native artifact, Molly and her friends Tooey and Oscar think everything they find might belong in a museum! Integrating Alaska Native culture and history with informational text, the video shows how labels in museums help explain the exhibits, while Molly and her friends also learn about traditional Alaska Native games and tools.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 10 :
10 ) Identify ways people throughout the country are affected by their human and physical environments.

Examples: land use, housing, occupation

•  Comparing physical features of regions throughout the United States
Example: differences in a desert environment, a tropical rain forest, and a polar region

•  Identifying positive and negative ways people affect the environment
Examples: positive—restocking fish in lakes, reforesting cleared land

negative—polluting water, littering roadways, eroding soil

•  Recognizing benefits of recreation and tourism at state and national parks (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (2)
Title: Native American Winter Count/Activity Starter
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/south-dakota-native-american-winter-count-video/activity-starter/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students learn about Native American winter counts in South Dakota and complete an interesting activity. This video is part of Activity Starters, which is an animated video series. In each episode an animated character introduces a concept and an activity



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 3 :
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Clip 6: The Conclusion
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/3a88c76e-4d07-4001-bcd2-f62c9e8d673c/the-conclusion/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, the kids discuss how much they learned on their adventure and their new-found excitement for Alabama history.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 1 :
1 ) Compare historical and current economic, political, and geographic information about Alabama on thematic maps, including weather and climate, physical-relief, waterway, transportation, political, economic development, land-use, and population maps.

•  Describing types of migrations as they affect the environment, agriculture, economic development, and population changes in Alabama
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Clip 2: Moundville
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/dfd5a6cf-1e70-42e8-a240-a9e8fa257058/moundville/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students will be led on a historical adventure. After jumping through the portal into this world, the kids go on an adventure to learn more about Moundville, one of the largest Native American towns ever built.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Clip 3: Old Mobile
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b02f2cea-6ac0-4afb-a57a-636b6f16bf86/old-mobile/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, the kids continue their adventure in Old Mobile, a settlement for French colonists in the early 1700s. They view artifacts from these early settlers at the University of South Alabama Archaeology Museum.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 3 :
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Clip 4: Tribal Archives of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/237afe70-992e-438d-b320-4f7ebe937d84/tribal-archives-of-the-poarch-band-of-creek-indians/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, the kids head to the Tribal Archives of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians to view artifacts and records that show them more about the Creek Indians and their importance in Alabama.

 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 1 :
1 ) Compare historical and current economic, political, and geographic information about Alabama on thematic maps, including weather and climate, physical-relief, waterway, transportation, political, economic development, land-use, and population maps.

•  Describing types of migrations as they affect the environment, agriculture, economic development, and population changes in Alabama
[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[SS2010] ALA (4) 3 :
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
[SS2010] ALA (4) 5 :
5 ) Describe Alabama's entry into statehood and establishment of its three branches of government and the constitutions.

•  Explaining political and geographic reasons for changes in location of Alabama's state capital
•  Recognizing roles of prominent political leaders during early statehood in Alabama, including William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, Israel Pickens, William Rufus King, and John W. Walker
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Archaeology Adventures: Early Alabama History (Full Episode)
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/2ea3cc35-603f-46a1-9e1c-b493bba82503/archaeology-adventures-early-alabama-history/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, three young kids venture outside their 2-D animated world to learn about early Alabama history for their upcoming school report. Aided by their hyper-intelligent robotic friend Roto and a magical portal, they visit some of Alabama’s historic sites to learn about Native American societies, early settlers, and the beginning of Alabama’s statehood. With the help of local archaeologists and historians, they just might make it back home in time to get to school and turn in their report!



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 3)
Title: Conducting a Genealogical Study
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/women/women_genealogy.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students learn about the methods and tools necessary to conduct a genealogical interview to research women's history in their family.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Darkroom Detective
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/sodhouse/sodhouse_detective.pdf
Description:

In this activity, students learn about life in a sod house by looking at photographs (primary sources) and answering questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Document Detective
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/slavelife/slave_detective.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students analyze newspaper advertisements (primary source) regarding runaway slaves from the Charleston Mercury, a South Carolina newspaper, to learn about the Underground Railroad.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 6 :
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[ARTS] VISA (0) 5 :
5) Create and tell a story with art that communicates about a familiar person, place, or thing.

Example: Use symbols and details to help tell a story.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 14 :
14) Create works of art about events in home, school, or community life.

Subject: Social Studies (K - 2), Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Make Your Own Quilt Square
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/women/women_quiltsquare.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students will learn about women's history and making quilts. Students will make a quilt square in honor of a person who is important to them.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 7 :
7 ) Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. [RL.1.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 6 :
6 ) Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and state lived in the past to how they live today. (Alabama)

•  Identifying past and present forms of communication
Examples: past—letter, radio, rotary-dial telephone

present—e-mail, television, cellular telephone

•  Identifying past and present types of apparel
•  Identifying past and present types of technology
Examples: past—record player, typewriter, wood-burning stove

present—compact diskette (CD) and digital video diskette (DVD) players, video cassette recorder (VCR), computer, microwave oven

•  Identifying past and present types of recreation
Examples: past—marbles, hopscotch, jump rope

present—video games, computer games

•  Identifying past and present primary sources
Examples: past—letters, newspapers

present—e-mail, Internet articles

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: English Language Arts (1 - 4), Social Studies (1 - 4)
Title: Read "Dakota Dugout"
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/sodhouse/sodhouse_readdakota.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students read Dakota Dugout by Ann Turner. They look at an object that would have been important to a woman living in a sod house and try to determine what the object is.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]

a. Infer the main idea and supporting details in narrative texts. (Alabama)

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Social Studies (2)
Title: Read "When Clay Sings"
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/pueblo/pueblo_readclaysings.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students read When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor and learn how to answer questions by examining an object.  



ALEX Classroom Resources: 13

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