ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GEOG (7) 3 :
3 ) Compare geographic patterns in the environment that result from processes within the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere of Earth's physical systems.

•  Comparing Earth-Sun relationships regarding seasons, fall hurricanes, monsoon rainfalls, and tornadoes
•  Explaining processes that shape the physical environment, including long-range effects of extreme weather phenomena
Examples: processes—plate tectonics, glaciers, ocean and atmospheric circulation, El Niño

long-range effects—erosion on agriculture, typhoons on coastal ecosystems

•  Describing characteristics and physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface
•  Comparing how ecosystems vary from place to place and over time
Examples: place to place—differences in soil, climate, and topography

over time—alteration or destruction of natural habitats due to effects of floods and forest fires, reduction of species diversity due to loss of natural habitats, reduction of wetlands due to replacement by farms, reduction of forest and farmland due to replacement by housing developments, reduction of previously cleared land due to reforestation efforts

•  Comparing geographic issues in different regions that result from human and natural processes
Examples: human—increase or decrease in population, land-use change in tropical forests

natural—hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, floods

Subject: Social Studies (7)
Title: What Does the Atmosphere Do? Crash Course Geography #6
URL: https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/11ZI9aqurfA?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=11ZI9aqurfA
Description:

Much like a cell membrane, our atmosphere forms a protective boundary between outer space and the biosphere that allows for all life to exist on Earth’s surface. Today, we’re going to talk about its composition and layers (the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere), follow the path of a sunbeam of light as it travels through space and (potentially) reaches Earth’s surface, and discuss how the greenhouse effect can be both a good and bad thing.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GEOG (7) 3 :
3 ) Compare geographic patterns in the environment that result from processes within the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere of Earth's physical systems.

•  Comparing Earth-Sun relationships regarding seasons, fall hurricanes, monsoon rainfalls, and tornadoes
•  Explaining processes that shape the physical environment, including long-range effects of extreme weather phenomena
Examples: processes—plate tectonics, glaciers, ocean and atmospheric circulation, El Niño

long-range effects—erosion on agriculture, typhoons on coastal ecosystems

•  Describing characteristics and physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface
•  Comparing how ecosystems vary from place to place and over time
Examples: place to place—differences in soil, climate, and topography

over time—alteration or destruction of natural habitats due to effects of floods and forest fires, reduction of species diversity due to loss of natural habitats, reduction of wetlands due to replacement by farms, reduction of forest and farmland due to replacement by housing developments, reduction of previously cleared land due to reforestation efforts

•  Comparing geographic issues in different regions that result from human and natural processes
Examples: human—increase or decrease in population, land-use change in tropical forests

natural—hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, floods

Subject: Social Studies (7)
Title: How Does the Earth Move? Crash Course Geography #5
URL: https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/ljjLV-5Sa98?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=ljjLV-5Sa98
Description:

In this video, we're going to talk about how the Earth moves, but to do that, we're going to have to go way back to the early days of the galaxy. Processes that happened before the Earth even formed have led us to the geographic patterns and processes that create Earth's environments and support all living things. We'll talk about how the Earth rotates, the effects of it being slightly tilted, how events like sea ice melting impact how the Earth wobbles, and talk about how our elliptical orbit gives us seasons. So many of our life decisions are influenced by the motion of Earth. It guides where we decide to live, what food we eat, or even what weather we experience, which we'll talk about more next time.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GEOG (7) 3 :
3 ) Compare geographic patterns in the environment that result from processes within the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere of Earth's physical systems.

•  Comparing Earth-Sun relationships regarding seasons, fall hurricanes, monsoon rainfalls, and tornadoes
•  Explaining processes that shape the physical environment, including long-range effects of extreme weather phenomena
Examples: processes—plate tectonics, glaciers, ocean and atmospheric circulation, El Niño

long-range effects—erosion on agriculture, typhoons on coastal ecosystems

•  Describing characteristics and physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface
•  Comparing how ecosystems vary from place to place and over time
Examples: place to place—differences in soil, climate, and topography

over time—alteration or destruction of natural habitats due to effects of floods and forest fires, reduction of species diversity due to loss of natural habitats, reduction of wetlands due to replacement by farms, reduction of forest and farmland due to replacement by housing developments, reduction of previously cleared land due to reforestation efforts

•  Comparing geographic issues in different regions that result from human and natural processes
Examples: human—increase or decrease in population, land-use change in tropical forests

natural—hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, floods

Subject: Social Studies (7)
Title: How Do Oceans Circulate? Crash Course Geography #9
URL: https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/xa6SdvFA3w0?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=xa6SdvFA3w0
Description:

In this video, students take a closer look at how the oceans circulate by following the life of a discarded water bottle as it gets snagged in the North Pacific Garbage Patch. We'll talk about what causes the movement of water, called current, both near the surface and much deeper in the oceans, and we'll show how they follow similar (but not identical) paths to the winds. Ocean circulation plays a huge role in cycling vital nutrients within the seas and helps us transport goods on ships across the globe and it's up to us to protect it.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GEOG (7) 3 :
3 ) Compare geographic patterns in the environment that result from processes within the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere of Earth's physical systems.

•  Comparing Earth-Sun relationships regarding seasons, fall hurricanes, monsoon rainfalls, and tornadoes
•  Explaining processes that shape the physical environment, including long-range effects of extreme weather phenomena
Examples: processes—plate tectonics, glaciers, ocean and atmospheric circulation, El Niño

long-range effects—erosion on agriculture, typhoons on coastal ecosystems

•  Describing characteristics and physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface
•  Comparing how ecosystems vary from place to place and over time
Examples: place to place—differences in soil, climate, and topography

over time—alteration or destruction of natural habitats due to effects of floods and forest fires, reduction of species diversity due to loss of natural habitats, reduction of wetlands due to replacement by farms, reduction of forest and farmland due to replacement by housing developments, reduction of previously cleared land due to reforestation efforts

•  Comparing geographic issues in different regions that result from human and natural processes
Examples: human—increase or decrease in population, land-use change in tropical forests

natural—hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, floods

Subject: Social Studies (7)
Title: How Does Air Temperature Shape A Place? Crash Course Geography #7
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrhQmxK7s5A
Description:

In this video, we’re going to visit Siberia and take a closer look at how temperatures there (and around the globe) impact the way cultures, communities, and landscapes form. Air temperature plays a much bigger role than just helping us decide what we’re going to wear every day, it dictates the kind of foods we can grow, how we build our cities and roads, and the kinds of industries that can even exist in a location. In a region like Siberia, where it can get cold, like REALLY COLD, the air temperature has had an incredible impact on life. Before we end this episode we’ll warm up with a visit to Phoenix, Arizona to talk about how they too have to make a lot of decisions due to the extreme heat of a city in the middle of the desert.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

Go To Top of page