ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: How the Brutal Trail of Tears Got Its Name
URL: https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/SosZ2ZRJymU?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=SosZ2ZRJymU
Description:

 This clip from the Smithsonian Channel discusses the Trail of Tears and how it got its name.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 13 :
13 ) Describe social and economic influences on United States' expansion prior to World War I.

•  Explaining how the development of transcontinental railroads helped the United States achieve its Manifest Destiny
•  Locating on a map states, capitals, and important geographic features west of the Mississippi River
•  Explaining how the United States acquired Alaska and Hawaii
•  Identifying major groups and individuals involved with the Westward Expansion, including farmers, ranchers, Jewish merchants, Mormons, and Hispanics
•  Analyzing the impact of closing the frontier on American Indians' way of life
•  Explaining how the Spanish-American War led to the emergence of the United States as a world power
[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Far and Away (7/9) Movie Clip - The Oklahoma Land Rush (1992) HD
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFrVoG-edFc
Description:

The colonists participate in the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889 with the hope of claiming a piece of land for themselves. This clip illustrates the transportation methods of the settlers at the time as well as the current situation: that land is up for grabs.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Thomas Jefferson and His Democracy/Crash Course US History #10
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/c6a0a70d-4705-4f2b-a517-28d6421b382d/thomas-jefferson-and-his-democracy-crash-course-us-history-10/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the founding father and third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson is a somewhat controversial figure in American history, largely because he, like pretty much all humans, was a big bundle of contradictions. Jefferson was a slave-owner who couldn't decide if he liked slavery. He advocated for small government but expanded federal power more than either of his presidential predecessors. John explores Jefferson's election, his policies, and some of the new nation's (literally and figuratively) formative events that took place during Jefferson's presidency. In addition to all this, Napoleon drops in to sell Louisiana, John Marshall sets the course of the Supreme Court, and John Adams gets called a tiny tyrant.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: The War of 1812/Crash Course US History #11
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/9cb066b8-fe79-4ed0-a0ce-ddab46b603f7/the-war-of-1812-crash-course-us-history-11/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the War of 1812. The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and its former colonial overlord England. John will take you through the causes of the war, tell you a little bit about the fighting itself, and get into just why the US Army couldn't manage to make any progress invading Canada. The upshot: no territory changed hands, and most of the other bones of contention were solved prior to the actual war. Although nothing much changed for the US and England, the Native Americans were the big losers. Tecumseh was killed, and the Indian tribes lost a lot of territories. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

[SS2010] US10 (10) 9 :
9 ) Explain dynamics of economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings, including transportation systems, Henry Clay's American System, slavery and the emergence of the plantation system, and the beginning of industrialism in the Northeast. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Examples: Waltham-Lowell system, "old" immigration, changing technologies

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: The Market Revolution/Crash Course US History #12
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/9a33ae0c-2c2c-404f-9a28-5027528c8903/the-market-revolution-crash-course-us-history-12/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Market Revolution. In the first half of the 19th century, the way people lived and worked in the United States changed drastically. At play was the classic American struggle between the Jeffersonian ideal of individuals sustaining themselves on small farms vs. the Hamiltonian vision of an economy based on manufacturing and trade. In the early 19th century, new technologies in transportation and communication helped remake the economic system of the country. Railroads and telegraphs changed the way people moved goods and information around. The Market Revolution meant that people now went somewhere to work rather than working at home. Often, that somewhere was a factory where they worked for an hourly wage rather than getting paid for the volume of goods they manufactured. This shift in the way people work has repercussions in our daily lives right down to today. Watch as John teaches you how the Market Revolution sowed the seeds of change in the way Americans thought about the roles of women, slavery, and labor rights.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 4 :
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800
[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

[SS2010] US10 (10) 11 :
11 ) Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct culture. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Second Great Awakening on the emergence of a national identity
•  Explaining the emergence of uniquely American writers
Examples: James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allen Poe

•  Explaining the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony on the development of social reform movements prior to the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Women in the 19th Century/Crash Course US History #16
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/64ce26b6-3607-4374-8bff-860376f7fdf3/women-in-the-19th-century-crash-course-us-history-16/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green finally gets around to talking about some women's history. In the 19th Century, the United States was changing rapidly, as we noted in the recent Market Revolution and Reform Movements episodes. Things were also in a state of flux for women. The reform movements, which were in large part driven by women, gave these self-same women the idea that they could work on their own behalf, and radically improve the state of their own lives. So, while these women were working on prison reform, education reform, and abolition, they also started talking about equal rights, universal suffrage, temperance, and fair pay. Women like Susan B. Anthony, Carry Nation, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Grimkes, and Lucretia Mott strove tirelessly to improve a lot of American women, and it worked, eventually. John will teach you about the Christian Temperance Union, the Seneca Falls Convention, the Declaration of Sentiments, and a whole bunch of other stuff that made life better for women.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: War and Expansion/Crash Course US History #17
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/5d445de2-a076-4352-8283-9e3e8c0ce817/war-and-expansion-crash-course-us-history-17/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Mexican-American War in the late 1840s and the expansion of the United States into the western end of North America. Famous Americans abound in this episode, including James K Polk (Young Hickory, Napoleon of the Stump), Martin Van Buren, Zachary Taylor, and Winfield Scott. You'll also learn about the California Gold Rush of 1848 and California's admission as a state, which necessitated the Compromise of 1850.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Manifest Destiny
URL: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-history/the-early-republic/age-of-jackson/a/manifest-destiny
Description:

This article from Khan Academy provides an overview of Manifest Destiny. In the mid-nineteenth century, newspaper editor John O'Sullivan coined the term "manifest destiny" to describe the belief that God intended for the United States to occupy North America from Atlantic to Pacific. Students can read the article as an introduction to a lesson on expansionism prior to the Civil War and answer the questions at the end of the article as an assessment.  The article can be read in a whole group setting or individually. It can be assigned through Google Classroom.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 10 :
10 ) Describe political, social, and economic events between 1803 and 1860 that led to the expansion of the territory of the United States, including the War of 1812, the Indian Removal Act, the Texas-Mexican War, the Mexican-American War, and the Gold Rush of 1849.

•  Analyzing the role of the Louisiana Purchase and explorations of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark for their impact on Westward Expansion
•  Explaining the purpose of the Monroe Doctrine
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the expansion movement in the United States, including the Battle of Horseshoe Bend and the Trail of Tears (Alabama)
•  Identifying the impact of technological developments on United States' expansion
Examples: steamboat, steam locomotive, telegraph, barbed wire

[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Conflicting Voices of the Mexican War
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/resources/Lesson4.pdf
Description:

In this lesson, students research conflicting perspectives of the Mexican War. Additional resources included are a map of the United States from 1839, a recruitment poster, and several videos of first-hand accounts from the Mexican War.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Movement and Migration: The Gold Nugget That Launched the Gold Rush
URL: http://objectofhistory.org/teachers/intro/goldnugget
Description:

In this lesson, students examine the gold nugget which began the California Gold Rush to understand the westward expansion and the idea of Manifest Destiny. This resource includes additional resources for the California Gold Rush.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 13 :
13 ) Describe social and economic influences on United States' expansion prior to World War I.

•  Explaining how the development of transcontinental railroads helped the United States achieve its Manifest Destiny
•  Locating on a map states, capitals, and important geographic features west of the Mississippi River
•  Explaining how the United States acquired Alaska and Hawaii
•  Identifying major groups and individuals involved with the Westward Expansion, including farmers, ranchers, Jewish merchants, Mormons, and Hispanics
•  Analyzing the impact of closing the frontier on American Indians' way of life
•  Explaining how the Spanish-American War led to the emergence of the United States as a world power
[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Native Americans and Manifest Destiny
URL: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/native-americans-and-manifest-destiny/ygA3XzpLtuVpFTCH#r
Description:

This collection of photographs illustrates the westward expansion and Manifest Destiny. The images tell the story of the impact of closing the frontier on American Indians' way of life. Be sure to click "Read More" at the top of the collection to view the lesson that can be used with this collection.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 11

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