ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Civil War Battles: Richmond
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/civil-war-battles-richmond-ken-burns-civil-war/civil-war-battles-richmond-ken-burns-civil-war/
Description:

Explore images of the fallen city of Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. General Ulysses S. Grant tried unsuccessfully to capture Richmond for nearly a year before he took the city on April 2, 1865. The battle would be a crippling defeat for the South and led to Robert E. Lee's surrender to Grant one week later on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Lincoln’s Assassination | Lincoln:
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ket-lincoln-history-19/lincolns-assassination/
Description:

Many Kentuckians turn against the war when Lincoln enlists black soldiers. There is also anger toward Lincoln because of the political and economic conditions. On April 14, 1865, Lincoln is assassinated. 

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Civil War Infantry, Troops, Regiments, and Reserves
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/civil-war-infantry-troops-ken-burns-civil-war/civil-war-infantry-troops-ken-burns-civil-war/
Description:

View a gallery of images of Confederate and Union Army regiments, troops, and infantry from Pennsylvania to Georgia, Virginia to Massachusetts. From 1861-1865, more than three million men fought in the American Civil War, and over 600,000 lost their lives in battle.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 13 :
13 ) Describe social and economic influences on United States' expansion prior to World War I.

•  Explaining how the development of transcontinental railroads helped the United States achieve its Manifest Destiny
•  Locating on a map states, capitals, and important geographic features west of the Mississippi River
•  Explaining how the United States acquired Alaska and Hawaii
•  Identifying major groups and individuals involved with the Westward Expansion, including farmers, ranchers, Jewish merchants, Mormons, and Hispanics
•  Analyzing the impact of closing the frontier on American Indians' way of life
•  Explaining how the Spanish-American War led to the emergence of the United States as a world power
[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Far and Away (7/9) Movie Clip - The Oklahoma Land Rush (1992) HD
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFrVoG-edFc
Description:

The colonists participate in the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889 with the hope of claiming a piece of land for themselves. This clip illustrates the transportation methods of the settlers at the time as well as the current situation: that land is up for grabs.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Abraham Lincoln by Schmoop
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtpLTOGqY5M&list=PLPS8GkIUM8Udy3Aaem2YRM9H1tcWbO7Oi&index=1
Description:

In this video, students learn about Abraham Lincoln, Honest Abe. Such a great nickname. We certainly wish that was our nickname. Abraham Lincoln was the president who led the country through the Civil War and abolished slavery. He rocked that black top hat. Let's all give him a pat on the back.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Battles of the Civil War/Crash Course US History #19
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/87183b79-ed27-49a4-bc60-f900d7bb8430/battles-of-the-civil-war-crash-course-us-history-19/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green lists a whole lot of the battles of the US Civil War in seven and a half minutes. We get a lot of requests for military history, so we offer a list of battle names, with some commentary about outcomes and lots of really interesting pictures.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: The Civil War Part I/Crash Course US History #20
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d67abdb2-68bf-4bc4-a45d-96ef11d3e5c8/the-civil-war-part-1-crash-course-us-history-20/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches about the Civil War. In part one of our two-part look at the US Civil War, John looks into the causes of the war and the motivations of the individuals who went to war. John also looks into why the North won and whether that outcome was inevitable. The North's industrial and population advantages are examined, as are the problems of the Confederacy, including its need to build a nation at the same time it was fighting a war. As usual, John doesn't get much into the actual battle by the battle breakdown. He does talk a little about the overarching strategy that won the war and Grant's plan to just overwhelm the South with numbers. Grant took a lot of losses in the latter days of the war, but, in the end, it did lead to the surrender of the South.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 4 :
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
[SS2010] US10 (10) 15 :
15 ) Compare congressional and presidential reconstruction plans, including African-American political participation. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Tracing economic changes in the post-Civil War period for whites and African Americans in the North and South, including the effectiveness of the Freedmen's Bureau
•  Describing social restructuring of the South, including Southern military districts, the role of carpetbaggers and scalawags, the creation of the black codes, and the Ku Klux Klan
•  Describing the Compromise of 1877
•  Summarizing post-Civil War constitutional amendments, including the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments
•  Explaining causes for the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson
•  Explaining the impact of the Jim Crow laws and Plessey versus Ferguson on the social and political structure of the New South after Reconstruction
•  Analyzing political and social motives that shaped the Constitution of Alabama of 1901 to determine their long-term effect on politics and economics in Alabama (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Reconstruction and 1876/Crash Course US History #22
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/6feaee14-3f86-4ecc-adb6-e3b08f125cbe/reconstruction-and-1876-crash-course-us-history-22/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about Reconstruction. After the divisive, destructive Civil War, Abraham Lincoln had a plan to reconcile the country and make it whole again. Then he got shot; Andrew Johnson took over, and the disagreements between Johnson and Congress ensured that Reconstruction would fail. The election of 1876 made the whole thing even more of a mess, and the country called it off, leaving the nation still very divided. John will talk about the gains made by African-Americans in the years after the Civil War and how they lost those gains almost immediately when Reconstruction stopped. You'll learn about the Freedman's Bureau, the 14th and 15th Amendments, and the disastrous election of 1876.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Exploring the Gettysburg Address
URL: http://americanhistory.si.edu/documentsgallery/exhibitions/education/Gettysburg_Tips_Interactive.pdf
Description:

This is informational material that can be used to teach about the Gettysburg Address. There are links to various resources including a recording of the Gettysburg Address and stories behind the words of the address. Students can also examine the document itself and compare it to other famous speeches such as the "I Have a Dream Speech".



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (10)
Title: Women's Role in the War Effort
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/resources/Lesson7.pdf
Description:

This lesson includes a video of Eugenia Phillips, a spy for the South, and object cards with different women's roles along with women's outfits from the Civil War era. Students research various women's roles from the Civil War era, research their clothing, and gather evidence regarding its importance to their role.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 8 :
8 ) Explain Alabama's economic and military role during the Civil War.

Examples: economic—production of iron products, munitions, textiles, and ships

military—provision of military supplies through the Port of Mobile, provision of an armament center at Selma

•  Recognizing military leaders from Alabama during the Civil War
•  Comparing roles of women on the home front and the battlefront during and after the Civil War
•  Explaining economic conditions as a result of the Civil War, including the collapse of the economic structure, destruction of the transportation infrastructure, and high casualty rates
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 11 :
11 ) Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct culture. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Second Great Awakening on the emergence of a national identity
•  Explaining the emergence of uniquely American writers
Examples: James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allen Poe

•  Explaining the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony on the development of social reform movements prior to the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 10)
Title: Who Am I? A History Mystery
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/resources/whoami/whoami.html
Description:

In this interactive activity, students will compare various roles of men and women at home and on the battlefront during the Civil War by playing an interactive game. Students choose a mystery character from the Civil War and select objects as clues to their identity. 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 11

Go To Top of page