ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 5 :
5 ) Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations.

•  Contrasting philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings
•  Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great
•  Identifying major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
[SS2010] USG (12) 1 :
1 ) Explain historical and philosophical origins that shaped the government of the United States, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the influence of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, and the Great Awakening.

•  Comparing characteristics of limited and unlimited governments throughout the world, including constitutional, authoritarian, and totalitarian governments
Examples: constitutional—United States

authoritarian—Iran

totalitarian—North Korea

Subject: Social Studies (9 - 12)
Title: The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8fe2c7e9-8d1e-4f70-9fbd-946eb8082910/the-rise-of-the-west-and-historical-methodology-crash-course-world-history-212/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about the methods of writing history by looking at some of the ways that the rise of the West has been recorded. In the episode, we'll cover what the West is, the Rise of the West, and the different ways that historians and other academics have explained how the West became dominant in the world. Also discussed are explanations from Acemoglu and Robinson's Why Nations Fail, Francis Fukuyama's The Origins of Political Order, and Ian Morris's Why the West Rules, for Now.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: Who Started World War I/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/4471f4bf-9e53-46d1-9ddf-7b3cdcc6942c/who-started-world-war-i-crash-course-world-history-210/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about the reasons World War I started and why the situation is so complicated. We'll try to get to the bottom of the confusion. However, it's very hard to assign blame to any one of the nations involved. Did the fault lie with Austria-Hungary? Germany? Russia? Julius Caesar? Join us for an interesting discussion in this episode of Crash Course.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: How World War I Started/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d8148c7c-655f-400e-b880-bd115fdecc7f/how-world-war-i-started-crash-course-world-history-209/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about World War I and the confusion surrounding its beginning. You'll learn about Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Pincep, the Black Hand, and why the Serbian nationalists wanted to kill the Archduke. While there's no good answer as to who exactly started the war, this episode of Crash Course will sort through the dates and confusion with lively discussion as always.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Beginning of World War II
URL: https://youtu.be/-kKCjwNvNkQ
Description:

This video from Khan Academy gives an overview of the events leading up to World War II. The video is 7 minutes 54 seconds in length.  It can be played during an introduction to World War II.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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