ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (12)
Title: Legal System Basics/Crash Course Government & Politics
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/judicial-government-courts-crashcourse-1018/legal-system-basics-crash-course-government-and-politics/
Description:

Learn about the judicial branch of government. It's pretty easy to forget that the courts, and the laws that come out of them, affect our lives on a daily basis. How are court decisions made, and where does each law's jurisdiction start and end? What are the three types of law? Find out in this episode.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 4 :
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800
[SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (10 - 12)
Title: Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances/Crash Course Government and Politics
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/separation-of-powers-government-crashcourse-1003/separation-of-powers-and-checks-and-balances-crash-course-government-and-politics/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, Craig Benzine teaches students about the U.S. government's separation of powers and the system of checks and balances. In theory, the legislative branch, the executive branch, and the judicial branch are designed to keep each other in check and to keep any branch from becoming too powerful. In reality, the system was designed to keep the president from becoming some kind of autocrat. For the most part, it has worked.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (12)
Title: McCulloch v. Maryland - Case Facts
URL: https://youtu.be/i5qQM7Mc2ho
Description:

This video from Khan Academy provides an overview of the landmark Supreme Court case that established strongly implied powers for the federal government, McCulloch v. Maryland. This video can be played to introduce a lesson on landmark Supreme Court cases.  The video is 7 minutes 48 seconds in length.

 


   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (12)
Title: Argument Wars
URL: https://www.icivics.org/node/210/resource?referer=curriculum/play/all&page_title=Curriculum%20All%20Games
Description:

In this interactive game from iCivics, students try out their persuasive abilities by arguing a real Supreme Court case. The other lawyer plays their competition. Whoever uses the strongest arguments wins! Landmark cases in the game include:

• Bond v. United States
• Brown v. Board of Education
• Gideon v. Wainwright
• Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier
• In Re Gault
• Miranda v. Arizona
• New Jersey v. T.L.O.

• Snyder v. Phelps
• Texas v. Johnson

This game can be played during a lesson on landmark Supreme Court cases for reinforcement or after as an assessment.

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   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] CIV (7) 5 :
5 ) Compare duties and functions of members of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government. (Alabama)

•  Locating political and geographic districts of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government (Alabama)
•  Describing the organization and jurisdiction of courts at the local, state, and national levels within the judicial system of the United States (Alabama)
•  Explaining concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances among the three branches of state and national governments (Alabama)
[SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (7 - 12)
Title: Court Quest
URL: https://www.icivics.org/node/853/resource?referer=curriculum/play/all&page_title=Curriculum%20All%20Games
Description:

In this interactive game from iCivics, students will help people from around the country to navigate the U.S. court system. Students will distinguish between the federal and state court systems, identify the types and levels of courts within each system, and evaluate case scenarios to send citizens to the correct court. This game can be played during a lesson on court systems for reinforcement or after as an assessment.

You will need to create a free account in order to access some of the content on this site.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] CIV (7) 6 :
6 ) Explain the importance of juvenile, adult, civil, and criminal laws within the judicial system of the United States.

•  Explaining rights of citizens as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights under the Constitution of the United States
•  Explaining what is meant by the term rule of law
•  Justifying consequences of committing a civil or criminal offense
•  Contrasting juvenile and adult laws at local, state, and federal levels (Alabama)
[SS2010] USG (12) 13 :
13 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the judicial branch of government of the United States, including checks by the judicial branch on other branches of government, limits on judicial power, and the process by which cases are argued before the United States Supreme Court.

•  Explaining the structure and jurisdiction of court systems of the United States, including lower courts and appellate courts
•  Identifying the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases on constitutional interpretation
Examples: Marbury versus Madison, Miranda versus Arizona, Tinker versus Des Moines, Gideon versus Wainwright, Reno versus American Civil Liberties Union, United States versus Nixon, McCulloch versus Maryland, Wallace versus Jaffree, Wyatt versus Stickney, Powell versus Alabama (Alabama)

•  Describing the shifting political balance of the court system, including the appointment process, the ideology of justices, influences on court decisions regarding executive and legislative opinion, public opinion, and the desire for impartiality
•  Contrasting strict and loose constructionist views of the Constitution of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (7 - 12)
Title: Supreme Decision
URL: https://www.icivics.org/node/209/resource?referer=curriculum/play/all&page_title=Curriculum%20All%20Games
Description:

In this interactive game from iCivics, students work with a case about Ben Brewer, who wore his favorite band t-shirt to school against dress policy. Students will help the Justice make up her mind and influence the outcome of the case. Students will analyze the First Amendment right to freedom of speech and expression, identify protected and unprotected speech, and simulate the deliberation process of Supreme Court Justices. This game can be played during a lesson on the judicial branch and Supreme Court cases for reinforcement or after as an assessment.

You will need to create a free account in order to access some of the content on this site.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 6

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