ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Investigating Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Variations | Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buac19-35-sci-ess-investigatetempprecip-lp/investigating-seasonal-temperature-and-precipitation-variations-lesson-plan/#.Xlao8C2ZMl4
Description:
Students interpret and organize temperature and precipitation data into tables, plot graphs, and compare the data across different locations and times of the year. They look for patterns and support claims about temperatures and precipitation across different seasons and locations.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 12 :
12 ) Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information (e.g., weather maps; diagrams; other visualizations, including radar and computer simulations) to support the claim that motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions.

a. Use various instruments (e.g., thermometers, barometers, anemometers, wet bulbs) to monitor local weather and examine weather patterns to predict various weather events, especially the impact of severe weather (e.g., fronts, hurricanes, tornados, blizzards, ice storms, droughts).

Subject: Science (3 - 6)
Title: Investigating Daily and Seasonal Weather | Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buac19-35-sci-ess-dailyseasonalweather-lp/investigating-daily-and-seasonal-weather-lesson-plan/
Description:

Students will investigate weather as a short-term and long-term phenomenon by reading about how daily weather data is collected, organized, and analyzed to look for patterns in order to predict seasonal weather. They will use data maps showing daily weather conditions, average monthly temperature, and total monthly precipitation. This lesson can be used to provide foundational knowledge before using the lesson Investigating Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Variations, in which students gather, plot, and analyze data.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 9 :
9 ) Observe, record, and share findings of local weather patterns over a period of time (e.g., increase in daily temperature from morning to afternoon, typical rain and storm patterns from season to season).

[SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (K - 3)
Title: Evidence of Weather
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buac17-k2-sci-ess-weatherphenomena/evidence-of-weather/
Description:

Observe and annotate various images of weather phenomena in this interactive drawing tool produced by WGBH. Weather is the combination of various factors—snow or rain, wind, sunlight and clouds, and temperature—that happens in a specific location at a specific time. As the combination of factors constantly shifts, the condition changes and leaves behind evidence that shows how the weather has changed. Students can use the images in this interactive tool to observe weather conditions and document evidence of weather that happened earlier in the day.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 9 :
9 ) Observe, record, and share findings of local weather patterns over a period of time (e.g., increase in daily temperature from morning to afternoon, typical rain and storm patterns from season to season).

[SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (K - 3)
Title: Making Weather Observations
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct15-sci-weather/making-weather-observations/
Description:

Students can make and annotate weather observations with this interactive drawing tool produced by WGBH. The resulting images can be downloaded, printed, saved, and shared. Students can use the documentation of their firsthand observations to communicate data about their local weather patterns, and—overtime—to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Wind!: An Interactive Lesson
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/reach-with-stem-wind/wind/
Description:

Catch the wind with a breezy little dragonfly as you learn all about wind. Watch competitive kite-flying, learn why the wind blows, then make your own windsock and chart real-life wind data.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Daily and Seasonal Weather | Interactive Lesson
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buac19-35-sci-ess-dailyseasonalweather-il/daily-and-seasonal-weather-interactive-lesson/
Description:

Students investigate the relationship between daily weather and seasonal weather. Students will read about how weather data is collected, then interpret examples of weekly and monthly weather data to find seasonal patterns. Visual supports (images), maps, and data alongside informational text provide students with the context they need to recognize differences between daily and seasonal weather.

The associated lesson plan, Investigating Daily and Seasonal Weather, provides additional support for teachers and students, including handouts and materials for diverse learners.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Variations | Interactive Lesson
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buac19-35-sci-ess-tempprecip-il/seasonal-temperature-and-precipitation-variations-interactive-lesson/
Description:

Students compare the seasonal weather at their location with another U.S. location. They interpret temperature and precipitation data maps, collecting and recording the data for the two locations in order to find patterns and make comparisons. Visual supports (video, images), data maps, and informational text provide students with the context they need to identify seasonal weather at two locations.

The associated lesson plan Investigating Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Variations provides more support for teachers and students, including handouts and materials for diverse learners.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Create a Weather Map
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/activity/create-weather-map/
Description:

In this lesson, students draw pictures that symbolize different types of weather and then use information about today's weather to make their own state weather map.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 12 :
12 ) Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information (e.g., weather maps; diagrams; other visualizations, including radar and computer simulations) to support the claim that motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions.

a. Use various instruments (e.g., thermometers, barometers, anemometers, wet bulbs) to monitor local weather and examine weather patterns to predict various weather events, especially the impact of severe weather (e.g., fronts, hurricanes, tornados, blizzards, ice storms, droughts).

Subject: Science (3 - 6)
Title: Extreme Weather on Earth and Other Planets
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/extreme-weather-earth-other-planets/
Description:

Students investigate extreme weather on Earth and other planets, learn about instruments used to measure weather, and design a space probe that will gather weather information on another planet.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RI.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 12 :
12 ) Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause and effect. [RI.3.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.4.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.4.2b]

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). [W.4.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.4.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.4.2e]

[ELA2015] (4) 25 :
25 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 22-24 above.) [W.4.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three Language standards in Grades K-4.) [W.4.5]

[ELA2015] (4) 27 :
27 ) With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting. [W.4.6]

[ELA2015] (4) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. [W.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 30 :
30 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.4.9]

a. Apply Grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions]"). [W.4.9a]

b. Apply Grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text"). [W.4.9b]

[ELA2015] (4) 31 :
31 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.4.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[SC2015] (3) 13 :
13 ) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5), Science (3)
Title: Weather Detectives: Questioning the Fact and Folklore of Weather Sayings
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/weather-detectives-questioning-fact-775.html
Description:

Before there were weather tools, people looked to the sky, plants, and animals for hints about what the weather would do. To remember these indicators, people coined weather sayings. But are these sayings true and reliable? This lesson explores the truth and reliability of weather-related sayings, such as, “Mare's tails and mackerel scales make tall ships take in their sails.” Students brainstorm weather sayings then investigate the accuracy and origins of the sayings in predicting the weather, using print and online resources in their research. Next, students write about and illustrate their weather sayings then share their results with their classmates. Finally, students discuss skepticism and when it may be a good response to information that is presented to them as fact.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 10

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