ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: I Spy (Camouflaged Animals in Art!)
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson14.html
Description:

Students will discuss how animals camouflage and the reasons why animals use camouflage in the wild.  They will analyze A Hare in the Forest by Hans Hoffman.  They will find animals that are camouflaged in the painting. Students will draw an animal that uses camouflage.  They will create a crayon resist and use watercolors to fill their piece.    



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Create an Illuminated Alphabet Word Book
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson15.html
Description:

Students will analyze decorated letters from illuminated manuscripts.  They will create a paper collage using an outline of a letter.  They will draw an animal that begins with the same letter.  Images will be compiled to create a class alphabet book.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 10 :
10) Select and describe works of art that illustrate daily life experiences.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 14 :
14) Create works of art about events in home, school, or community life.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Are You Sleeping?
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson16.html
Description:

Students will measure space and furniture using their feet.  They will analyze Bed (Lit à la Turque) by Jean-Baptiste Tilliard.  At home, students will sketch their bed and measure it with their feet.  In class, the students will compare and contrast the size of their bed with Bed (Lit à la Polonaise).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 1 :
1) Individually brainstorm multiple approaches to an art problem.

Examples: Create lists, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches.

Subject: Arts Education (2 - 4)
Title: Kandinsky Inspired by Music
URL: https://sargentart.com/lesson-plan/kandinsky-%c2%adinspired-by-music/
Description:

Students will analyze examples of Wassily Kandinsky's artwork focusing on shapes, lines, and colors. While listening to music, they will complete a nonobjective piece of art by cutting shapes, coloring around the shapes, and using lines.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] MUS (2) 10 :
10) Demonstrate understanding of expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) and how creators use them to convey expressive intent.

Example: Identify dynamic changes in Haydn's Symphony No.

94, "Surprise," through movement.

[ARTS] MUS (2) 18 :
18) Apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music for specific purposes.

[ARTS] MUS (3) 11 :
11) Demonstrate and describe how intent is conveyed through expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo).

Example: Experiment with dynamics and articulation and discuss how they change the impact of a piece.

[ARTS] MUS (3) 18 :
18) Demonstrate and describe how expressive qualities are used in performers' interpretations to reflect expressive intent.

Example: Sing music with expressive qualities and intent.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

Subject: Arts Education (2 - 3)
Title: The Music of Oceans
URL: http://www.keepingscore.org/sites/default/files/lessonplans/KSEd_The_Music_of_Oceans.pdf
Description:

Students will identify the four oceans using a globe. They will sing the Oceans song and listen to Claude Debussy's Le Mer. Students will use watercolors to show their emotional response to the music. They will identify the dynamics of the music and use those terms to describe the oceans.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] MUS (0) 1 :
1) Explore and experience music concepts.

Example: Explore musical sources freely, using found sounds, electronic sounds, or sounds from voice or instruments found in classroom, remembering to use both sound and silence.

[ARTS] MUS (0) 16 :
16) Demonstrate awareness of expressive qualities that reflect creators'/performers' expressive intent.

Example: Use body percussion to reflect dynamics in a piece of music.

[ARTS] MUS (1) 17 :
17) Demonstrate and identify expressive qualities that reflect creators'/performers' expressive intent.

Example: Play instruments to reflect dynamics in a piece of music.

[ARTS] MUS (2) 17 :
17) Demonstrate knowledge of music concepts and how they support creators'/performers' expressive intent.

Example: Without prompting, play instruments to reflect dynamics in a piece of music.

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Exploring the Sky with Van Gogh and Mozart
URL: http://www.keepingscore.org/sites/default/files/lessonplans/KSEd_Exploring_the_Sky_with_Van_Gogh_and_Mozart_Davis.pdf
Description:

Students will identify tempo and dynamics in Mozart's “Ah vous dirai-je, maman.” They will analyze van Gogh's Starry Night and identify lines and colors.  They will discuss the night sky, stars, and constellations. Students will respond to music through scarves. They will create their own Starry Night interpretation.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] MUS (2) 10 :
10) Demonstrate understanding of expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) and how creators use them to convey expressive intent.

Example: Identify dynamic changes in Haydn's Symphony No.

94, "Surprise," through movement.

[ARTS] MUS (3) 11 :
11) Demonstrate and describe how intent is conveyed through expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo).

Example: Experiment with dynamics and articulation and discuss how they change the impact of a piece.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 12 :
12) Interpret art by identifying the mood or feeling suggested by a work of art through subject matter and visual qualities.

Examples: Talk about color qualities and composition in Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

Subject: Arts Education (2 - 3)
Title: Leaves in the Key of Autumn
URL: http://www.keepingscore.org/sites/default/files/lessonplans/KSEd_Leaves_in_the_Key_of_Autumn_Sato.pdf
Description:

Students will listen to Antonio Vivaldi's Autumn and identify the instruments, tempo, and dynamics heard.  They will identify the emotions, colors, and visual imagery.  They will sketch and paint fall leaves.  They will discuss why leaves change colors.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] MUS (2) 17 :
17) Demonstrate knowledge of music concepts and how they support creators'/performers' expressive intent.

Example: Without prompting, play instruments to reflect dynamics in a piece of music.

[ARTS] MUS (3) 18 :
18) Demonstrate and describe how expressive qualities are used in performers' interpretations to reflect expressive intent.

Example: Sing music with expressive qualities and intent.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

Subject: Arts Education (2 - 3)
Title: Four Seasons in a Deciduous Forest
URL: http://www.keepingscore.org/sites/default/files/lessonplans/KSEd_Four_Seasons_in_a_Deciduous_%20Forest_Knapp.pdf
Description:

Students will listen to and analyze each movement of Antonio Vivaldi's The Four Seasons.  They will identify musical elements that represent each season.  They will use oil pastels to create a deciduous tree in all four seasons.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 3 :
3) Generate ideas and employ a variety of strategies and techniques to create a work of art/design.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 2 :
2) Demonstrate the methods of the art-making process, including brainstorming, sketching, reflecting, and refining, to create a work of art/design.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 5)
Title: 7 Color-Mixing Activities to Try With Watercolor
URL: https://theartofeducation.edu/2021/03/17/7-color-mixing-activities-to-try-with-watercolor/
Description:

The article includes seven activities to practice mixing colors - glazing lines, transparent shape diagrams, color bias color wheels, washable markers drips, watercolor pencil layering, monochromatic layers, and color mixing chart.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 10 :
10) Perceive and describe characteristics of natural and man-made environments.

Example: Compare lines on a seashell to lines made by fence posts.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 13 :
13) Use learned art vocabulary to express preferences about artwork.

Example: Use statements as, "I know the texture of the cat is soft from the pencil marks."

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Finding Thin and Thick Lines in Patterns
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-2.pdf
Description:

Students will identify different aspects of lines in art - long, short, vertical, horizontal, diagonal, thick, thin.  They will compare and contrast lines in human-made and natural objects.  They will use different tools to create thick and thin lines.  Finally, they will create a print.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, and lesson plan included in PDF. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 1 :
1) Brainstorm collaboratively to create a work of art.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 14 :
14) Create works of art about events in home, school, or community life.

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Forms for Characters
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-5.pdf
Description:

Students will brainstorm character traits described in a story. They will make a preliminary sketch of the character.  Finally, students will create a three-dimensional face in clay.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, and lesson plan included in PDF. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 4 :
4) Demonstrate safe and proper procedures for cleaning, utilizing, and maintaining materials, tools, and equipment while making art.

Examples: properly using brushes, closing glue bottles and marker tops.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 11 :
11) Categorize images based on expressive properties.

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Cool and Warm Colors
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-6.pdf
Description:

Students will identify cool colors (blue, green, violet) and describe cool settings.  They will use oil pastels to draw a cool setting from a story. They will fill the page using strokes, layers, and blends.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 3 :
3) Extend skills by individually following sequential steps to create works of art on subjects that are real or imaginary.

Example: Use the book A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle.
Create a real or imagined home.

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Selecting a Palette
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-7.pdf
Description:

Students will compare and contrast colors in paintings.  They will create two paintings - one with a broad palette (12+ colors) and one with a narrow palette (4 or fewer colors).  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.     



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RL.K.1]

a. Make predictions to determine main idea and anticipate an ending. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (1) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RL.1.1]

a. Make predictions from text clues. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]

a. Infer the main idea and supporting details in narrative texts. (Alabama)

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 2), Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Adjective Monster
URL: https://www.kennedy-center.org/education/resources-for-educators/classroom-resources/lessons-and-activities/lessons/k-2/adjective-monster/
Description:

Students will identify adjectives in the book Go Away Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley.  They will choose an adjective and a shape to create an adjective monster using construction paper and chalk/crayon.  They will create features using paper sculpture techniques.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] MUS (0) 12 :
12) Perform music with expression.

[ARTS] MUS (1) 13 :
13) Perform music for a specific purpose with expression.

[ARTS] MUS (2) 13 :
13) Perform music for a specific purpose with expression and technical accuracy.

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Animal Habitats
URL: https://www.kennedy-center.org/education/resources-for-educators/classroom-resources/lessons-and-activities/lessons/k-2/animal-habitats/
Description:

Students will echo sing the lyrics from the book Over in the Jungle by Marianne Berkes. They will brainstorm different habitats and animals.  They will use clay to create an animal from one of the habitats.  The teacher will photograph the animals and make a presentation for the class.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 24 :
24 ) Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure. [W.1.1]

a. Write simple poems addressing a topic. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (1) 25 :
25 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure. [W.1.2]

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 5 :
5) Create an artwork using found and/or recycled objects.

Examples: Use objects such as leaves, rocks, paper tubes, egg cartons, etc.
Use book A Day with No Crayons by Elizabeth Rusch.

Subject: English Language Arts (1), Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: A Natural Balance in Photography and Poetry
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson41.html
Description:

Students will view and describe two cyanotypes. The class will write a poem describing an object in nature.  Students will create a balanced composition using found objects from nature on NaturePrint Paper. They will write a cinquain poem to describe their composition.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: I Spy Irises
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson37.html
Description:

Students will review colors, shapes, and lines.  They will analyze the painting, Irises, by Vincent van Gogh. They will draw flowers using crayons.  They will create a crayon-resist using green and blue watercolors.    



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Python, Python, What Do You See?
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson31.html
Description:

Students will analyze Python Killing a Gnu by Antoine-Louis Barye.  They will identify a sculpture as three-dimensional. They will explore creating different textures in modeling clay.  They will make a snake with the clay. They will create a three-dimensional setting for their snake.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 5 :
5) Create and tell a story with art that communicates about a familiar person, place, or thing.

Example: Use symbols and details to help tell a story.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 5 :
5) Create an artwork based on observation of familiar objects and scenes that reflect their own social or cultural identity.

Example: Draw a picture of a celebration.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 14 :
14) Create works of art about events in home, school, or community life.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: All in the Family
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson33.html
Description:

Students will analyze a painting depicting a family. They will use modeling clay to create sculptures of family members. They will use markers to add features and hair and clothe the sculpture using scrap fabric or paper. They will create a room for the family members in a diorama box.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 2)
Title: Take a Trip on the Chandelier
URL: http://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/classroom_resources/curricula/arts_lang_arts/a_la_lesson25.html
Description:

Students will analyze Chandelier by Gérard-Jean Galle.  They will make a papier-mâché hot air balloon sculpture.  They will decorate the ballon by making patterns using shapes, paint, drawings, or stickers.     



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 6 :
6) Integrate art vocabulary while planning and creating art.

a. Elements of art: line, shape, neutral colors, value, texture.

b. Picture compositions: overlapping, background, horizontal, vertical orientation.

c. Colors in the color wheel: primary, secondary, warm and cool.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 3 :
3) Generate ideas and employ a variety of strategies and techniques to create a work of art/design.

Subject: Arts Education (2 - 4)
Title: The Elements of Art: Shape
URL: https://www.nga.gov/education/teachers/lessons-activities/elements-of-art/shape.html
Description:

Students will analyze different types of shapes in Beasts of the Sea by Henri Matisse.  They will create a paper collage using geometric and natural shapes. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 1 :
1) Engage collaboratively in exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

Examples: Work with partner or small group to create an artwork.

Use the book Perfect Square by Michael Hall to help "thinking outside the box" skills.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 3 :
3) Generate ideas and employ a variety of strategies and techniques to create a work of art/design.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 1 :
1) Combine ideas to develop an innovative approach to creating art.

Subject: Arts Education (K - 5)
Title: NGAKids Art Zone
URL: https://www.nga.gov/education/kids-app.html
Description:

NGAKids Art Zone is a free iPad app.  It includes eight interactive activities, a sketchbook, and a personal exhibition space.  The activities are designed for children to use independently. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (1) 3 :
3) Develop skills by following a sequence of steps to create works of art on subjects that are real or imaginary.

Example: The teacher will model an artistic technique.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 3 :
3) Generate ideas and employ a variety of strategies and techniques to create a work of art/design.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 1 :
1) Combine ideas to develop an innovative approach to creating art.

Subject: Arts Education (1 - 5)
Title: Creative Creatures
URL: https://philamuseum.org/doc_downloads/education/lessonPlans/Creative%20Creatures.pdf
Description:

Students will analyze the painting, Person in the Presence of Nature, by Joan Miró. They will create a creature that could live in the landscape in the painting. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 6 :
6) Integrate art vocabulary while planning and creating art.

a. Elements of art: line, shape, neutral colors, value, texture.

b. Picture compositions: overlapping, background, horizontal, vertical orientation.

c. Colors in the color wheel: primary, secondary, warm and cool.

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Abstract Objects
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-4.pdf
Description:

Students will identify simplification and exaggeration in art.  They will draw a simplified and exaggerated object.  They will create a stencil print using sponge painting.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.   



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 1 :
1) Brainstorm collaboratively to create a work of art.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 7 :
7) Collaborate on ways to publicly display artwork based on a theme or concept.

Subject: Arts Education (2)
Title: Shapes in Space
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-8.pdf
Description:

Students will identify positive and negative space.  They will create a paper sculpture.  Groups of four will display their sculptures and discuss the positive and negative spaces created.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. [RL.2.4]

[ELA2015] (2) 22 :
22 ) Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.1]

a. Write free verse poetry to express ideas. (Alabama)

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

[ARTS] VISA (2) 3 :
3) Extend skills by individually following sequential steps to create works of art on subjects that are real or imaginary.

Example: Use the book A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle.
Create a real or imagined home.

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Arts Education (2)
Title: Rhythm and Repetition
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-9.pdf
Description:

Students will identify repetition in works of art.  They will write a poem using repetition.  They will create a border using a repetitive pattern.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]

a. Infer the main idea and supporting details in narrative texts. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. [RL.2.5]

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Arts Education (2)
Title: Illustrating a Story
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Second-Grade-Lesson-10.pdf
Description:

Students will brainstorm the beginning, middle, and end of artwork and a familiar story.  They will create a paper collage to illustrate the beginning, middle, or end of a story. Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 11 :
11 ) Interpret legends, stories, and songs that contributed to the development of the cultural history of the United States.

Examples: American Indian legends, African-American stories, tall tales, stories of folk heroes

[ARTS] VISA (2) 2 :
2) Explore personal interests and curiosities with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Paper-weaving, drawing, and resist painting.

Use book about weaving, The Goat in the Rug by Charles L. Blood & Martin Link.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Clay animals and pipe cleaner sculptures.

Use a book about clay, When Clay Sings by Byrd Baylor.

Subject: Social Studies (2), Arts Education (2)
Title: Explore Pueblo Pots
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/pueblo/pueblo_explore.pdf
Description:

This is a hands-on learning activity where students learn the meaning of imagery by examining images on two Pueblo pots and reading short excerpts from Native American folklore. They will design their own pots by creating symbols and explaining the meaning of the symbols.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 28
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