ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 11 :
5) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly.

Examples: Face-to-face collaborative groups or interactions, online interactions, role play.

[DLIT] (1) 12 :
6) Identify appropriate and inappropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Examples: Cyberbullying, online etiquette.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K - 1)
Title: Be Kind Online
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/47a35461-b8db-4337-9fca-123676b38d85/47a35461-b8db-4337-9fca-123676b38d85/
Description:

How do we act when we are on the Internet? Here are some good manners when we are on the Internet. Use good words, not rude or bad words. Be patient with others. Sometimes others are beginners and are just learning how to use the Internet. This video can be played to demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly during a lesson on communicating in a digital environment.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (0) 11 :
5) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly.

Examples: Face-to-face collaborative groups or interactions, online interactions, role play.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Media Balance Is Important
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/media-balance-is-important
Description:

Students consider the feelings of themselves and others when making decisions about when, where, and how much to use technology. Through video and song, students will learn to balance the time they use technology and when to take breaks. 

Students will be able to:
  • Know when and why to take breaks from device time.
  • Consider the feelings of the people around them, even when engaged in fun online activities.
Users will need to create a free account to access resources. 


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (0) 11 :
5) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly.

Examples: Face-to-face collaborative groups or interactions, online interactions, role play.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Pause for People
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/pause-for-people
Description:
Whether it's watching TV or playing on a tablet, using tech can be super fun! Often, kids find it hard to transition from an online activity to an offline one. Teach your students a simple routine for how to manage those inevitable digital interruptions that are part of everyone's lives in the digital age. By examining feelings associated with being asked to stop doing something we enjoy, students will learn that it is respectful and kind to be mindful of the requests of others. 
 
Students will be able to:
  • Learn why it's important to be aware and respectful of people while using devices.
  • Learn the Pause, Breathe, Finish Up routine as a self-regulation strategy for transitioning from technology to face-to-face interactions.

 Users will need to create a free account to access resources. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 11 :
5) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly.

Examples: Face-to-face collaborative groups or interactions, online interactions, role play.

[DLIT] (0) 19 :
13) Use a design process in a guided setting to create an artifact or solve a problem.

Example: Problem - understanding locations on the school campus. Solution - draw paper or digital maps of the school.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 2: Stevie and the Big Project (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/2/
Description:

When students run into a barrier while answering a question or working on a project, it’s so easy for them to get frustrated and give up. This lesson will introduce students to the idea that frustration can be an important part of learning. Here, frustration is presented as a step in the creative process, rather than a sign of failure.

This lesson can be done over one or two class sessions. If you have more time, feel free to draw out the building and revising phase of the Marble Run activity. The goal of this lesson is to help students realize that failure and frustration are common when working on projects, but that doesn't mean that they should give up. In this lesson, students will develop an understanding of what it means to be frustrated while working on a large project. It's possible that not every student will experience frustration with this activity, but there are many opportunities to open a discussion about moments in the past where students have felt frustrated but nevertheless persisted.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 11 :
5) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for working with others responsibly and kindly.

Examples: Face-to-face collaborative groups or interactions, online interactions, role play.

[DLIT] (0) 19 :
13) Use a design process in a guided setting to create an artifact or solve a problem.

Example: Problem - understanding locations on the school campus. Solution - draw paper or digital maps of the school.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 5: Happy Maps (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/5/
Description:

This unplugged lesson brings together teams with a simple task: get the "flurb" to the fruit. Students will practice writing precise instructions as they work to translate written instructions into the symbols provided. If problems arise in the code, students should also work together to recognize bugs and build solutions. The bridge from algorithms to programming can be a short one if students understand the difference between planning out a sequence and encoding that sequence into the appropriate language. This activity will help students gain experience reading and writing in shorthand code.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource. 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 5

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