ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 4)
Title: Tynker Hour of Code: Star Runner
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d157641c-ded7-45ca-9c3b-e6c65d08f1ff/tynker-hour-of-code-star-runner/
Description:

Students apply computer programming concepts as they experiment and discover how to draw squares, triangles, and other geometric shapes using pen-drawing commands. This interactive game can be used during a lesson on constructing elements of a simple computer program using basic commands. Enhances STEM learning outcomes as they trace complex patterns to collect all of the orbs. Estimated time: 20 min. More free coding activities at Tynker Hour of Code



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 4)
Title: Tynker Hour of Code: Trail Blazer
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/7a1042b7-e2fa-4f80-ae4b-a2f679b571f5/tynker-hour-of-code-trail-blazer/
Description:

Students apply geometry concepts to create patterns and shapes while they learn computer programming. Enhances STEM learning outcomes as they program their spaceship to race through the galaxy. This interactive game can be used during a lesson on constructing elements of a simple computer program using basic commands. Estimated time: 40 min. More free coding activities at Tynker Hour of Code



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: Ready Jet Go!: What is Programming?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ready-jet-go-what-is-programming/what-is-programming-ready-jet-go/
Description:

How do people talk to computers? In this clip from Ready Jet Go!, Jet and his friends learn about computer programming from Dr. Rafferty. They demonstrate how it works by using colored playing blocks to signify different computer commands. This video can be played during a lesson on constructing elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 4)
Title: Tynker Hour of Code Puzzle: Candy Quest
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/77f553b2-1639-405b-817d-308da3e60cd2/tynker-hour-of-code-puzzle-candy-quest/
Description:

Students are introduced to computer programming concepts as they solve basic coding puzzles, and enhance STEM learning outcomes as they play a fun coding adventure game. Learn skills such as patterning, sequencing, loops, conditionals, critical thinking and problem solving, while leading a personalized troll through the adventure! This interactive game can be used during a lesson on constructing elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others. Est. time: 30 min. More free coding activities @ Tynker.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 5)
Title: How to Make a Video Game
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/2143a241-f8d9-4a54-a4a5-b9634797bd28/make-a-video-game/
Description:

Video games are fun to play, but have you ever wondered how to make one? Carmelo, a grad student in the MIT Media Lab, shows how anyone can start learning how to create video games by talking to machines through programming languages using block-based programming. This video can be played to introduce a lesson on computer programming.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Story Cubes
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/storycubes-1047/storycubes-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

Print this PBS KIDS ScratchJr Story Cubes and let the cubes decide which backgrounds and PBS KIDS characters to use! This will help students get ready for block programming. 

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on IPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablet.

This resource can be used during a lesson on constructing elements of a simple computer program.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Simon Says
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/simon-says-1040/simon-says-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

Print and shuffle the following block slides to play the PBS KIDS ScratchJr Block version of Simon Says.

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Human Robot
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/human-robot/human-robot-pbs-scratchjr/
Description:

Print this Human-Robot Activity Handout and guide the students in a game of Human-Robot where they use the cuttable blocks to program each other to act out different sequences.

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: How-To Cards
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/how-to-cards-1029/how-to-cards-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

These How-To Cards introduce multiple pathways and features to help children get started using the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app for block programming. Print, cut, glue, and make them available for children to reference as they work with the app.

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Interactive Characters Activity
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/pbs-kids-scratch-jr-interactive-activity/pbs-kids-scratch-jr-interactive-activity/
Description:

In this lesson, students (K-3) will be introduced to the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app by creating interactive characters that respond to tap. Through this process, they will learn about movement blocks, looks blocks, the ‘start on tap’ trigger, and character selection.

PBS KIDS Scratch Jr. app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Animated Scenes Activity
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/pbs-kids-scratch-jr-animation-activity/pbs-kids-scratch-jr-animation-activity/
Description:

In this activity, students (K-3) will be introduced to the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app by animating characters from their favorite PBS KIDS shows. Through this process, they will learn about movement blocks, the ‘start on flag’ trigger, and character selection.

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Tree Problem - PEG + CAT Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/tree-problem-lesson-plan/tree-problem-lesson-plan-scratchjr/
Description:

Peg and Cat have a really big problem! Cat is stuck in a tree. Again! In this activity, children will be challenged to create projects with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app where they help Peg rescue her friend Cat.

Children will learn how to create projects, add characters, and how to use the programming blocks to make their characters animate on screen. They will explore coding and computational thinking practices as they utilize technology as a tool for creativity, expression, and learning with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.

[DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Science (2), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: How Plants Grow Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/how-plants-grow-lesson-plan-scratchjr/how-plants-grow-lesson-plan-scratchjr/
Description:

Tally Ho! Inspired by NATURE CAT, in this activity children will explore cause and effect relationships and what plants need to grow and thrive. Children will be challenged to create projects in PBS KIDS ScratchJr where they make their own plants and trees grow.

Children will learn how to use the PBS KIDS ScratchJr programming blocks to make animated stories and interactive projects. They will explore coding and computational thinking practices as they utilize technology as a tool for creativity, expression and learning with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 11 :
11 ) Construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism's ability to survive when compared to the resources in a certain habitat (e.g., freshwater organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in saltwater; desert organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in woodlands).

a. Construct explanations that forming groups helps some organisms survive.

b. Create models that illustrate how organisms and their habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

c. Categorize resources in various habitats as basic materials (e.g., sunlight, air, freshwater, soil), produced materials (e.g., food, fuel, shelter), or as nonmaterial (e.g., safety, instinct, nature-learned behaviors).

[DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Science (3), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Creature Powers Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d84dd6a1-14bd-44a7-883f-bd266c397d2a/creature-powers-lesson-plan-scratchjr/
Description:

Activate Creature Powers! Inspired by the WILD KRATTS, in this activity children will be challenged to create PBS KIDS ScratchJr projects that explore different animals and their unique behaviors and traits.

Children will learn how to create projects, add characters, and how to use the programming blocks to make their characters animate and move on the screen. They will explore coding and computational thinking practices as they utilize technology as a tool for creativity, expression, and learning with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Space Exploration Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/94cd24b5-fc6b-49b1-85c5-52ba04ae4d98/space-exploration-lesson-plan-scratchjr/
Description:

Excelsior! Inspired by READY JET GO!, in this activity, children will be challenged to use PBS KIDS ScratchJr to create projects where they blast off and explore our solar system.

Children will learn how to use the PBS KIDS ScratchJr programming blocks to make animated stories and interactive projects. They will explore coding and computational thinking practices as they utilize technology as a tool for creativity, expression, and learning with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: What is Coding
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/whatiscoding/what-is-coding-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

This video explores our definition of coding and what it looks like to code with PBS KIDS ScratchJr. This video will explain coding to help get students ready for block-based coding. 

PBS KIDS Scratch Jr. app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Becky's Choice Lesson Plan
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/beckys-choice-lesson-plan-scratch-jr/beckys-choice-lesson-plan-scratchjr/
Description:

Word up! In this activity, children will explore decision-making as they use PBS KIDS ScratchJr to help WordGirl make a tough choice between saving the day and going to her friend’s birthday party.

Children will learn how to use the PBS KIDS ScratchJr programming blocks to make animated stories and interactive projects. They will explore coding and computational thinking practices as they utilize technology as a tool for creativity, expression, and learning with the PBS KIDS ScratchJr app.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Cootie Catcher
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/cootie-catcher-1046/cootie-catcher-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

Print this PBS KIDS ScratchJr Cootie Catcher and have fun practicing sequence blocks with your favorite PBS KIDS characters! This will give additional practice for block coding. 

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 3)
Title: PBS KIDS Scratch Jr.: Programming Blocks Cheat Sheet
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/programming-blocks-cheat-sheet/programming-blocks-cheat-sheet-pbs-kids-scratchjr/
Description:

Use the PBS KIDS ScratchJr Cheat Sheet as a quick guide for various programming blocks. 

PBS KIDS ScratchJr app is now available for free from the App Store on iPad and from the Google Play store on Android tablets.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 4 :
R4) Identify and employ appropriate troubleshooting techniques used to solve computing or connectivity issues.

[DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 24 :
18) Investigate the design process and use digital tools to illustrate potential solutions to a problem, given guidance and support

Examples: Create a presentation, drawing or graphic, audio tool, or video.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 2: Programming with Angry Birds (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/2/
Description:

Using characters from the game Angry Birds, students will develop sequential algorithms to move a bird from one side of a maze to the pig at the other side. To do this, they will stack code blocks together in a linear sequence, making them move straight, turn left, or turn right.

In this lesson, students will develop programming and debugging skills on a computer platform. The block-based format of these puzzles helps students learn about sequence and concepts, without having to worry about perfecting syntax.

Students will be able to:
- translate movements into a series of commands.
- identify and locate bugs in a program.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 7: Getting Loopy (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/7/
Description:

As we start to write longer and more interesting programs, our code often contains a lot of repetition. In this lesson, students will learn about how loops can be used to more easily communicate instructions that have a lot of repetition by looking at the repeated patterns of movement in a dance.

At this point in the course, students should have developed comfort with programming a set of linear instructions. Frequently the linear set of instructions includes patterns that are repeated multiple times and as students want to write more complex and interesting programs, manually duplicating that code becomes cumbersome and inefficient. To enable students to write more powerful programs, we'll need to rely on structures that break out of that single linear list. Loops allow for students to structure their code in a way that repeats. In this lesson, we will focus on identifying patterns in physical movement before moving back onto the computer to look for patterns in our code.

Students will be able to:
- repeat actions initiated by the instructor.
- translate a picture program into a real-world dance.
- convert a series of multiple actions into a single loop.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 8: Loops with Rey and BB-8 (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/8/
Description:

In this lesson, students will be learning more about loops and how to implement them in Blockly code. Using loops is an important skill in programming because manually repeating commands is tedious and inefficient. With the Code.org puzzles, students will learn to add instructions to existing loops, gather repeated code into loops, and recognize patterns that need to be looped. It should be noted that students will face puzzles with many different solutions. This will open up discussions on the various ways to solve puzzles with advantages and disadvantages to each approach.

Students will be able to:
- identify the benefits of using a loop structure instead of manual repetition.
- break down a long sequence of instructions into the largest repeatable sequence.
- employ a combination of sequential and looped commands to reach the end of a maze.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

[DLIT] (2) 24 :
18) Investigate the design process and use digital tools to illustrate potential solutions to a problem, given guidance and support

Examples: Create a presentation, drawing or graphic, audio tool, or video.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 9: Sticker Art with Loops (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/9/
Description:

Watch student faces light up as they make their own gorgeous designs using a small number of blocks and digital stickers! This lesson builds on the understanding of loops from previous lessons and gives students a chance to be truly creative. This activity is fantastic for producing artifacts for portfolios or parent/teacher conferences.

This series highlights the power of loops with creative and personal designs.

Offered as a project-backed sequence, this progression will allow students to build on top of their own work and create amazing artifacts.

Students will be able to:
- identify the benefits of using a loop structure instead of manual repetition.
- differentiate between commands that need to be repeated in loops and commands that should be used on their own.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

[DLIT] (2) 24 :
18) Investigate the design process and use digital tools to illustrate potential solutions to a problem, given guidance and support

Examples: Create a presentation, drawing or graphic, audio tool, or video.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 10: Harvesting Crops with Loops (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/10/
Description:

In the preceding stage, students used loops to create fantastic drawings. Now they're going to loop new actions in order to help the harvester collect multiple veggies growing in large bunches.

It may seem unnecessarily repetitive to have two plugged stages introducing loops, but the practice of using loops for different reasons develops a student's understanding of what loops can do. In "Loops in Maze" students only used loops to repeat movements. In this lesson, students will use loops to repeat other actions like harvesting pumpkins. New patterns will emerge and students will use creativity and logical thinking to determine what code needs to be repeated and how many times.

Students will be able to:
- write a program for a given task which loops a single command.
- identify when a loop can be used to simplify a repetitive action.
- employ a combination of sequential and looped commands to move and perform actions.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 11: The Big Event (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/11/
Description:

Students will soon learn that events are a great way to add flexibility to a pre-written algorithm. Sometimes you want your program to be able to respond to the user exactly when the user wants it to. Events can make your program more interesting and interactive.

Today, students will learn to distinguish events and actions. The students will see activities interrupted by having a "button" pressed on a paper remote. When seeing this event, the class will react with a unique action. Events are widely used in programming and should be easily recognizable after this lesson.

Students will be able to:
- repeat commands given by an instructor.
- recognize the movements of the teacher as signals to initiate commands.
- practice differentiating pre-defined actions and event-driven ones.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 12: Build a Flappy Game (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/12/
Description:

In this special stage, students get to build their own Flappy Bird game by using event handlers to detect mouse clicks and object collisions. At the end of the level, students will be able to customize their game by changing the visuals or rules.

Events are very common in computer programs. In this lesson, students will further develop their understanding of events by making a Flappy Bird game. Students will learn to make their character move across the screen, make noises, and react to obstacles based on user-initiated events.

Students will be able to:
- match blocks with the appropriate event handler.
- create a game using event handlers.
- share a creative artifact with other students.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (2) 7 :
1) Create and sort information into useful order using digital tools.

Examples: Sort data spreadsheets A-Z, simple filters, and tables.

[DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

[DLIT] (2) 24 :
18) Investigate the design process and use digital tools to illustrate potential solutions to a problem, given guidance and support

Examples: Create a presentation, drawing or graphic, audio tool, or video.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 14: Chase Game with Events (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/14/
Description:

In this online activity, students will have the opportunity to learn how to use events in Play Lab and to apply all the coding skills they've learned to create an animated game. It's time to get creative and make a game in Play Lab!

Here, students will further develop their understanding of events using Play Lab. Students will use events to make characters move around the screen, make noises, and change backgrounds based on user input. At the end of the puzzle sequence, students will be presented with the opportunity to share their projects.

Students will be able to:
- create an animated, interactive game using sequence and event-handlers.
- identify actions that correlate to input events.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 7 :
1) Create and sort information into useful order using digital tools.

Examples: Sort data spreadsheets A-Z, simple filters, and tables.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 24 :
18) Investigate the design process and use digital tools to illustrate potential solutions to a problem, given guidance and support

Examples: Create a presentation, drawing or graphic, audio tool, or video.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 15: Looking Ahead With Minecraft (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/15/
Description:

This lesson was originally created for the Hour of Code, alongside the Minecraft team. Students will get the chance to practice ideas that they have learned up to this point, as well as getting a sneak peek at conditionals!

If puzzles will work to solidify and build on the knowledge of loops and introduce conditionals. By pairing these two concepts together, students will be able to explore the potential for creating fun and innovative programs in a new and exciting environment.

Students will be able to:
- define circumstances when certain parts of a program should run and when they shouldn't.
- determine whether a conditional is met based on criteria.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 3 :
3 ) Demonstrate and explain how structures made from small pieces (e.g., linking cubes, blocks, building bricks, creative construction toys) can be disassembled and then rearranged to make new and different structures.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 14 :
8) Interpret ways in which computing devices have influenced people's lives.

Example: Discuss tasks completed daily in which some type of device is used to make the tasks easier (calculator, microwave to quickly heat food, mobile phone for instant communication).

Subject: Science (2), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Milo, the Science Rover: A LEGO WeDo 2.0 Activity
URL: https://education.lego.com/en-us/lessons/wedo-2-science/getting-started-project-a
Description:

In this activity, students will discover ways that scientists and engineers can use rovers to explore places where humans cannot go. Students will construct a science rover using the LEGO WeDo 2.0 kit and program the rover using WeDo 2.0 Software or a compatible programming app. Students will also document completion of the programming task and evidence of learning how the rover can help scientists make discoveries. 

This activity was demonstrated during the Exploring Today's Classroom (ETC) Summit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 7 :
1) Create and sort information into useful order using digital tools.

Examples: Sort data spreadsheets A-Z, simple filters, and tables.

[DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 5: Collecting Treasure with Laurel (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/5/
Description:

In this series of puzzles, students will continue to develop their understanding of algorithms and debugging. With a new character, Laurel the Adventurer, students will create sequential algorithms to get Laurel to pick up treasure as she walks along a path.

In this lesson, students will be practicing their programming skills using a new character, Laurel the Adventurer. When someone starts programming they piece together instructions in a specific order using something that a machine can read. Through the use of programming, students will develop an understanding of how a computer navigates instructions and order. Using a new character with a different puzzle objective will help students widen their scope of experience with sequencing and algorithms in programming.

Students will be able to:
- order movement commands as sequential steps in a program.
- represent an algorithm as a computer program.
- develop problem-solving and critical thinking skills by reviewing debugging practices.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm for other learners to follow.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, illustrate sequence of a process such as baking a cake.

[DLIT] (2) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program using basic commands.

Examples: Digital block-based programming, basic robotics.

[DLIT] (2) 10 :
4) Identify bugs in basic programming.

Examples: Problem-solving, trial and error.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 6: Creating Art with Code (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/6/
Description:

In this lesson, students will take control of the Artist to complete drawings on the screen. This Artist stage will allow students to create images of increasing complexity using new blocks like move forward by 100 pixels and turn right by 90 degrees.

Building off of the students' previous experience with sequencing, this lesson will work to inspire more creativity with coding. The purpose of this lesson is to solidify knowledge of sequencing by introducing new blocks and goals. In this case, students learn more about pixels and angles using the new blocks, while still practicing their sequencing skills. Also, students will be able to visualize new goals such as coding the Artist to draw a square.

Students will be able to:
- create a program to complete an image using sequential steps.
- break complex shapes into simple parts.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 31

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