ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Device-Free Moments
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/device-free-moments
Description:

Technology use isn't always a distraction, but there are definitely times when it's best to keep devices away. Help students learn when it's appropriate to use technology and when it's not -- and practice making family rules for device-free time at home.

Students will be able to:
  • Recognize the ways in which digital devices can be distracting.
  • Identify how they feel when others are distracted by their devices.
  • Identify ideal device-free moments for themselves and others.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: That's Private!
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/thats-private
Description:

Staying safe online is a lot like staying safe in the real world. By helping a Digital Citizen sign up for a new app, students learn about the kinds of information they should keep to themselves when they use the internet -- just as they would with a stranger in person.

Students will be able to:
  • Recognize the kind of information that is private.
  • Understand that they should never give out private information online.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Digital Trails
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/digital-trails
Description:

Does what you do online always stay online? Students learn that the information they share online leaves a digital footprint or "trail." Depending on how they manage it, this trail can be big or small, and harmful or helpful. Students compare different trails and think critically about what kinds of information they want to leave behind.

Students will be able to:
  • Learn that the information they share online leaves a digital footprint or "trail"
  • Explore what information is OK to be shared online

User will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

[DLIT] (2) 14 :
8) Interpret ways in which computing devices have influenced people's lives.

Example: Discuss tasks completed daily in which some type of device is used to make the tasks easier (calculator, microwave to quickly heat food, mobile phone for instant communication).

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Who Is In Your Online Community?
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/who-is-in-your-online-community
Description:

We are all connected via the internet! By learning the Rings of Responsibility, students explore how the internet connects us to people in our community and throughout the world. Help your students think critically about the different ways they connect with others, both in-person and online.

Students will be able to:
  • Compare and contrast how they are connected to different people and places, in person and on the internet
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how people can connect on the internet

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Putting a STOP to Online Meanness
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/putting-a-stop-to-online-meanness
Description:

The internet is filled with all kinds of interesting people, but sometimes, some of them can be mean to each other. With this role play, help your students understand why it's often easier to be mean online than in person, and how to deal with online meanness when they see it.

Students will be able to:
  • Understand what online meanness can look like and how it can make people feel
  • Identify ways to respond to mean words online, using S-T-O-P

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT1 (1) 6 :
6 ) Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and state lived in the past to how they live today. (Alabama)

•  Identifying past and present forms of communication
Examples: past—letter, radio, rotary-dial telephone

present—e-mail, television, cellular telephone

•  Identifying past and present types of apparel
•  Identifying past and present types of technology
Examples: past—record player, typewriter, wood-burning stove

present—compact diskette (CD) and digital video diskette (DVD) players, video cassette recorder (VCR), computer, microwave oven

•  Identifying past and present types of recreation
Examples: past—marbles, hopscotch, jump rope

present—video games, computer games

•  Identifying past and present primary sources
Examples: past—letters, newspapers

present—e-mail, Internet articles

[DLIT] (1) 14 :
8) Identify ways in which computing devices have impacted people's lives.

Example: Location services, instantaneous access to information.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Social Studies (1), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1 - 2)
Title: The Role of Technology
URL: https://www.midlandisd.net/cms/lib01/TX01000898/Centricity/Domain/3308/Grade_01_Social_Studies_Unit_10_Exemplar_Lesson_04__The_Role_of_Technology.pdf
Description:

Technology has changed the world faster than many of us could imagine and continues to change the world at a daunting pace. Technological advances have had a tremendous impact on goods, services, jobs, and markets over the last 50 years. The Internet and electronic communication have changed the way we do business. While people still use stores for many goods and services, people are able to place orders for rare or unusual goods that can be filled quickly, from the comfort of their home. Children born in the last decade often do not have an understanding of how things have changed. This lesson focuses on those changes and will introduce the students to some of those changes. Because of scarcity, we are not always able to satisfy our wants. We have to choose some things and give up others. Anytime we make a choice, there is something that is not chosen. The value of the next best alternative is called the opportunity cost. Every decision has an opportunity cost.

Students will examine and analyze photographs that show life in the past, list the objects and people in the photos, compare life and technology today to the past, and identify ways technology has changed or lives. Students will interview an adult to gain information about how goods, services, and technology have changed over time. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 13: Screen Out the Mean (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/13/
Description:

This lesson helps children to recognize that it is essential to tell a trusted adult if something online makes them feel angry, sad, or scared.

Students learn that other people can sometimes act like bullies when they are online. They will explore what cyber-bullying means and what they can do when they encounter it. After reading a scenario about mean online behavior, students discuss what cyber-bullying is, how it can make people feel, and how to respond. Finally, they use their knowledge to create a simple tip sheet on cyber-bullying in their journal.

Students may not ever have the misfortune of experiencing cyber-bullying, but we want to make sure that the students are prepared for and knowledgeable about it, in case they ever witness it during an online situation. Students will learn how to identify cyber-bullying and what steps they should take to make it stop. This may become helpful in later puzzles when students have the opportunity to share their work. If someone negatively responds to a student's work, this lesson will provide them with the tools that they need to handle the situation.

Students will be able to:
- analyze online behaviors that could be considered cyber-bullying.
- explain how to deal with a cyber-bullying situation.
- recognize the importance of engaging a trusted adult if the student experienced cyber-bullying.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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