ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 7 :
1) Construct a basic system of numbers, letters, or symbols to represent information as a cipher.

Examples: Combine data from multiple sources, sorting multi-level.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: The Caesar Shift Cipher and Pattern Detection
URL: https://www.cipherchallenge.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Lesson-plan-1.pptx
Description:

Students will create a Caesar cipher wheel, explore word patterns, and decrypt a message using a Caesar cipher tool. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 7 :
1) Construct a basic system of numbers, letters, or symbols to represent information as a cipher.

Examples: Combine data from multiple sources, sorting multi-level.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: A Beginner's Guide to Codebreaking
URL: https://www.cipherchallenge.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/A-beginners-guide-to-codebreaking-1.1b.pdf
Description:

These notes form a brief introduction to using and cracking substitution ciphers and transposition ciphers, to accompany the teaching materials provided with the University of Southampton National Cipher Challenge. The website for the competition can be found at www.cipherchallenge.org.

Written by Prof. Graham A. Niblo



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 7 :
1) Use numbers or letters to represent information in another form.

Examples: Secret codes/encryption, Roman numerals, or abbreviations.

[DLIT] (4) 7 :
1) Construct a basic system of numbers, letters, or symbols to represent information as a cipher.

Examples: Combine data from multiple sources, sorting multi-level.

[DLIT] (7) 15 :
9) Identify common methods of securing data.

Examples: Permissions, encryption, vault, locked closet.

[DLIT] (8) 28 :
22) Encrypt and decrypt various data.

Example: Create and decipher a message sent in a secret code.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 8)
Title: What Is Cryptography?
URL: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/intro-to-cryptography
Description:

What is Cryptography? A story which takes us from Caesar to Claude Shannon. Created by Brit Cruise.

On the left side of the linked webpage, there are additional resources related to cryptology, including Caesar cipher, polyalphabetic cipher, and the Enigma machine.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 7 :
1) Construct a basic system of numbers, letters, or symbols to represent information as a cipher.

Examples: Combine data from multiple sources, sorting multi-level.

[DLIT] (4) 8 :
2) Formulate a list of sub-problems to consider while addressing a larger problem.

Examples: Problem - a multi-step math problem; sub-problem - steps to solve.
Problem - light bulb does not light; sub-problem - steps to resolve why.

[DLIT] (4) 9 :
3) Show that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.

[DLIT] (4) 10 :
4) Detect and debug logical errors in various basic algorithms.

Example: Trace the path of a set of directions to determine success or failure.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 1: My Robotic Friends (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/1/
Description:

Using a special set of offline commands, students will design algorithms to instruct a "robot" to stack cups in different patterns. Students will take turns participating as the robot, responding only to the algorithm defined by their peers. This segment teaches students the connection between symbols and actions, the difference between an algorithm and a program, and the valuable skill of debugging.

This unplugged lesson brings the class together as a team with a simple task to complete: get a "robot" to stack cups in a specific design. Students will work to recognize real-world actions as potential instructions in code. The art of following precise instructions will also be practiced, as students work to translate algorithms into code, using the symbols provided. If problems arise in the code, students should work together to recognize bugs and build solutions. This activity lays the groundwork for the programming that students will do throughout the course as they learn the importance of defining a clearly communicated algorithm.

Students will be able to:
- reframe a sequence of steps as an encoded program.
- identify and address bugs or errors in sequenced instructions.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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