ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 13 :
7) Describe how automation works to increase efficiency.

Example: Compare the amount of time/work to hand wash a car vs. using an automated car wash.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 8 :
2) Explain how abstraction is used in a given function.

Example: Examine a set of block-based code and explain how abstraction was used.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 12 :
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computational Thinking
URL: https://www.remc.org/21Things4Students/21/21-computational-thinking/
Description:

Have you ever had a complex problem that you needed to solve? This could be a math problem, science experiment, an essay you need to write, and coding and game design. It could even be as simple as planning the best route to school or baking your favorite cookies!

Computational thinking can be used to take a complex problem, understand what the problem is and develop possible solutions to solve or explain it.

Students will complete Quests to learn about the four stages of computational thinking:


LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

When you have completed this activity you will:

  1. understand computational thinking [Computational Thinker]
     
  2. be able to solve complex problems using computational thinking. [Computational Thinker]

  3. be able to break down a problem into smaller more manageable parts. [Computational Thinker]

  4. know how to look for patterns and sequences. [Computational Thinker]

  5. be able to focus on important information only. [Computational Thinker]

  6. be able to develop a step-by-step solution to the problem. [Computational Thinker]

  7. know how to use coding to automate a task [Computational Thinker]

  8. understand computational design by applying technology to a problem [Innovative Designer]

  9. understand programming as you complete hands-on activities, solving problems encountered [Computational Thinker]

  10. understand the coding your program creates [Empowered Learner]



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm that is defined by simple pseudocode.

[DLIT] (5) 10 :
4) Create a simple pseudocode.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 13 :
7) Describe how automation works to increase efficiency.

Example: Compare the amount of time/work to hand wash a car vs. using an automated car wash.

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 12 :
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5 - 8)
Title: Finite State Automata
URL: https://classic.csunplugged.org/finite-state-automata/
Description:

Computer programs often need to process a sequence of symbols such as letters or words in a document, or even the text of another computer program. Computer scientists often use a finite-state automaton to do this. A finite-state automaton (FSA) follows a set of instructions to see if the computer will recognize the word or string of symbols. We will be working with something equivalent to a FSA—treasure maps!

The goal of the students is to find Treasure Island. Friendly pirate ships sail along a fixed set of routes between the islands in this part of the world, offering rides to travelers. Each island has two departing ships, A and B, which you can choose to travel on. You need to find the best route to Treasure Island. At each island you arrive at you may ask for either ship A or B (not both). The person at the island will tell you where your ship will take you to next, but the pirates don’t have a map of all the islands available. Use your map to keep track of where you are going and which ship you have traveled on.

 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (6) 29 :
23) Discuss how digital devices may be used to collect, analyze, and present information.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 8 :
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (7) 33 :
27) Identify data needed to create a model or simulation of a given event.

Examples: When creating a random name generator, the program needs access to a list of possible names.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 10 :
4) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: 38 = 3*3*3*3*3*3*3*3; =(Average) used in a spreadsheet to average a given list of grades.

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 6 Chapter 1 Lesson 9: Make a Game (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd6-2018/stage/9/puzzle/1
Description:

Students take what they've learned through Unit 6 Chapter 1 and develop an app of their own design that uses the circuit board to output information.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 9 :
3) Create pseudocode that uses conditionals.

Examples: Using if/then/else (If it is raining then bring an umbrella else get wet).

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 8 :
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

[DLIT] (7) 10 :
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 10 :
4) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: 38 = 3*3*3*3*3*3*3*3; =(Average) used in a spreadsheet to average a given list of grades.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 12 :
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 2 Lesson 15: Velocity (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/15/puzzle/1
Description:

After a brief review of how the counter pattern is used to move sprites, the class is introduced to the properties that set velocity and rotation speed directly. As they use these new properties in different ways, they build up the skills they need to create a basic side scroller game.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 9 :
3) Create pseudocode that uses conditionals.

Examples: Using if/then/else (If it is raining then bring an umbrella else get wet).

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 10 :
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 10 :
4) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: 38 = 3*3*3*3*3*3*3*3; =(Average) used in a spreadsheet to average a given list of grades.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 6: Sprites (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/6/puzzle/1
Description:

In order to create more interesting and detailed images, the class is introduced to the sprite object. Every sprite can be assigned an image to show, and sprites also keep track of multiple values about themselves, which will prove useful when making animations. At the end of the lesson, everyone creates a scene using sprites.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 10 :
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 7: The Draw Loop (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/7/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson introduces the draw loop, one of the core programming paradigms in the Game Lab. The class combines the draw loop with random numbers to manipulate some simple animations with dots and then with sprites. Afterward, everyone uses what they learned to update the sprite scene from the previous lesson.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 1 Chapter 1 Lesson 3: Exploring Problem Solving
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd1-2018/stage/3/puzzle/1
Description:

In this lesson, the class applies the problem-solving process to three different problems: a word search, a seating arrangement for a birthday party, and planning a trip. The problems grow increasingly complex and poorly defined to highlight how the problem-solving process is particularly helpful when tackling these types of problems.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 2 Lesson 14: Project - Personal Portfolio Website
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/14/puzzle/1
Description:

In the last few days of the unit, the class finalizes their personal websites, working with peers to get feedback. Then, the students will review the rubric and put the finishing touches on the site. To cap off the unit, everyone shares their projects and how they were developed.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 2: Plotting Shapes (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/2/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson explores the challenges of communicating how to draw with shapes and uses a tool that introduces how this problem is approached in the Game Lab. The class uses a Game Lab tool to interactively place shapes on Game Lab's 400 by 400 grid. Partners then take turns instructing each other how to draw a hidden image using this tool, accounting for many of the challenges of programming in Game Lab.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 3: Drawing in Game Lab (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/3/puzzle/1
Description:

The class is introduced to the Game Lab, the programming environment for this unit, and begins to use it to position shapes on the screen. The lesson covers the basics of sequencing and debugging, as well as a few simple commands. At the end of the lesson, the class creates an online version of the image they designed in the previous lesson.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 8 :
2) Explain how abstraction is used in a given function.

Example: Examine a set of block-based code and explain how abstraction was used.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 4: Shapes and Randomization (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/4/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson extends the drawing skills to include width and height and introduces the concept of random number generation. The class learns to draw with versions of the ellipse() and rect() that include width and height parameters and to use the background() block to fill the screen with color. At the end of the progression, the class is introduced to the randomNumber() block and uses the new blocks to draw a randomized rainbow snake.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 33 :
27) Identify data needed to create a model or simulation of a given event.

Examples: When creating a random name generator, the program needs access to a list of possible names.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 1 Lesson 2: Websites for Expression (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/2/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson introduces websites as a means of personal expression. The class first discusses different ways that people express and share their interests and ideas, then looks at a few exemplary websites made by students from a previous course. Finally, everyone brainstorms and shares a list of topics and interests to include, creating a resource for developing a personal website in the rest of the unit.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 1 Lesson 4: Headings
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/4/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson continues the introduction to HTML tags, this time with headers. The class practices using header tags to create page and section titles and learns how the different header elements are displayed by default. Next, the class plans how to organize their content on the personal web pages that will be built across the unit and begins the first page of the project.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 1 Lesson 5: Digital Footprint
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/5/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson takes a step back from creating the personal website to talk about personal information people choose to share digitally. The class begins by discussing what types of information are good to share with other people, then looks at several sample social media pages to see what types of personal information could be shared intentionally or unintentionally. Finally, the class comes up with a set of guidelines to follow when putting information online.

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   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 1 Chapter 1 Lesson 1: Intro to Problem Solving
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd1-2018/stage/1/puzzle/1
Description:

The class works in groups to design aluminum foil boats that will support as many pennies as possible. At the end of the lesson, groups reflect on their experiences with the activity and make connections to the types of problem-solving they will be doing for the rest of the course.

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   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 1 Chapter 1 Lesson 2: The Problem Solving Process
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd1-2018/stage/2/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson introduces the formal problem-solving process that the class will use over the course of the year: Define - Prepare - Try - Reflect. The class relates these steps to the aluminum boat problem from the previous lesson, then a problem they are good at solving, then a problem they want to improve at solving. At the end of the lesson, the class collects a list of generally useful strategies for each step of the process to put on posters that will be used throughout the unit and year.

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ALEX Classroom Resources: 16

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