ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Why More News Sites Are Dumping Their Comment Sections
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/trolling-comments-kqed/the-lowdown-why-more-news-sites-are-dumping-their-comment-sections-lesson-plan/
Description:

Trolling is not new behavior, but why do people do it? And what effects does it have? Trolls tend to antagonize communities in order to amuse themselves and get attention at the expense of others. Trolling has caused some online publications and news organizations to remove comments from their sites due to the effects the comments had on readers’ perceptions of the content, as well as the costs associated with moderating the comments. In this Lowdown lesson, students will analyze the research presented about why people post mean or negative “trolling” comments, as well as evaluate how trolling has affected online communities and reflect on how it should be addressed. This lesson plan will need to be downloaded. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/
Description:

Social media is a mixed bag. Being online may increase chances of identity theft and cyberbullying, yet, it’s estimated over 20% of 8 to 12 year-olds have at least one social media account—sometimes without their parents’ knowledge. At times, tweens are taking back charge of their brand, started by their parents since they were born, and sometimes, they are looking to share and connect with a community they have trouble finding face-to-face. So, What’s the right age to start using social media? This resource includes a video and student handout with discussion questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Is the Internet Making You Meaner?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/internet-making-you-meaner-above-the-noise/internet-making-you-meaner-above-the-noise/
Description:

If the Internet's making you feel meaner, you're not imagining it. People really do act differently online than they do in person. Here’s why. According to a paper published in 2004 by psychologist John Suler, there are about 6 main reasons people act differently online. This could explain the rise of internet trolls or why people open up more online than they would in person. A student viewing guide with discussion questions is available to be used with this video. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Are Internet Trolls Born or Made?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/internet-trolls-kqed/are-internet-trolls-born-or-made-above-the-noise/
Description:

Trolls are all over the internet, just annoying people to no end. What makes someone an internet troll? Are some people just destined to be a troll, or do they develop this ability? Believe it or not, there have been numerous scientific studies surrounding this behavior. Explore the science behind trolling behavior in the latest Above the Noise video. This video comes with a student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Who's Snooping on You Online?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/online-privacy-tips-kqed/whos-snooping-on-you-online-above-the-noise/
Description:

With recent reports of high profile data breaches, ransomware attacks, and the prevalence of online trackers, it’s hard to know how best to protect your privacy online. In this Above the Noise video, we met up with the cybersecurity experts at Electronic Frontier Foundation to learn more about who’s snooping on us online and what we can do to protect ourselves. This video comes with a student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Can You Trust Influencers on YouTube?
URL: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/advertising-youtube-kqed/can-you-trust-influencers-on-youtube-above-the-noise/
Description:

YouTube has been around for over a decade now, and it dominates as the top place for video content. Because of that, it’s way more of a business now than anyone could have imagined. The advertising world refers to many of the stars on YouTube, Instagram, and other social media platforms as influencers, because they have their own, home-grown fanbase that they have been interacting with for years. To capitalize on that fanbase, companies pay these influencers to promote their product or service. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to find out whether you can trust what's on YouTube and what are the rules about influencers advertising products in their videos. This video comes with a student handout that helps guide the discussion of this activity.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (8) 33 :
27) Analyze assistive technologies and how they improve the quality of life for users.

Example: Research multiple speech to text technologies and write a persuasive essay in favor of one over another.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: How to Come Up With Your Own Mobile App
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/62fd9efe-5be8-488e-90ef-d3a88779bc4b/toolkit-how-to-come-up-with-your-own-mobile-app/
Description:

Students will learn to see smartphone apps as tools to solve real-world problems. This lesson guides students through a design brainstorm process to invent an app idea related to public art. Students will be designing an app idea to tackle a problem related to public art in their community. All you need is the activity worksheet, some pens, markers, and creativity!

WHY APPS? Well, to start with, they’re everywhere. According to the Pew Research Center, 78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of those own smartphones. Teens don’t have to be limited to the role of the consumer in today’s digital marketplace. All you need is a little know-how and an idea—which is the focus of this curriculum. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Can Hackers Be Heroes?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8721d2e3-c31a-44fa-acdd-2ef1aa18b6a3/can-hackers-be-heroes-off-book/
Description:

PBS's Off Book asks if hacking is inherently good or bad, or if is it an ethical area we have yet to define. Looking beyond the media hype and scare tactics, it is clear that "hacking" is a term that should be up for debate, and that some hackers could actually be heroes and not villains.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12)
Title: Is Facial Recognition Invading Your Privacy?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/facial-recognition-software-kqed/is-facial-recognition-invading-your-privacy-above-the-noise/
Description:

Facial recognition is creeping more and more into our daily lives. Facebook and Google use it for auto-tagging photos. Snapchat uses it to create hilarious filters. And Apple’s new iPhone will allow you to use your face to unlock your phone. But this same technology can be used by governments and companies to learn as much as they can about you. Find out how facial recognition technology works in the newest Above the Noise video. This video comes with a student viewing guide.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (8) 22 :
16) Present content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Example: Create and share a help video for a senior's center that provides tips for online safety.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Intellectual Property and Trademarks
URL: https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/kids/icreatm_guide_hs.pdf
Description:

The lesson begins on page 26 of the document accessed via the resource link.

Students will:

- be able to define the term "trademark".

- categorize products as generic or brand name.

- identify popular trademarks.

- identify symbols associated with the protection of trademarks.

- utilize a trademark database. 

- create a custom trademark and present it to the class. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 24 :
18) Explain the beneficial and harmful effects that intellectual property laws can have on innovation.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Intellectual Property Theft
URL: https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/kids/icreatm_guide_hs.pdf
Description:

The lesson begins on page 43 of the document accessed via the resource link.

Students will:

- identify different types of media as intellectual property: writings, music, videos, computer games, etc.

-understand that intellectual property laws protect online and offline material.

-understand that it is stealing from real people if one copies copyright-protected material or downloads material from the internet without permission.

-understand it is against the law to download copyright-protected videos, music, etc. from the internet without permission.

- investigate famous cases of trade secret theft.

- investigate peer-to-peer networks.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (9-12) 3 :
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Is It Fair?
URL: https://newseumed.org/is-it-fair
Description:

In this lesson plan from Newseum, students use a video and graphics to help tune up their “fairness meters” to detect three key factors that can determine how objective or biased a news story is; then they analyze real-life examples.

Accessing this resource requires a free account. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7)
Title: My Media Use: A Personal Challenge
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/my-media-use-a-personal-challenge
Description:

Most of us use a lot of digital media in our daily lives -- even when we don't realize it! Having a balance between online and offline time is important, but a healthy media balance might look different for everyone. Help students create a personalized plan for healthy media use.

Students will be able to:
  • make an inventory of their media choices and how those choices make them feel.
  • brainstorm personal strategies for balancing media use.
  • create personal guidelines for promoting healthy media balance.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7)
Title: Big, Big Data
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/big-big-data
Description:

Every time we go online, we're giving away information about ourselves. But just how much data are companies collecting from us? Hint: It's probably a lot more than we realize. Show your students these three tips on how to limit the data that companies collect.

Students will be able to:
  • explain why information about them and their behaviors is valuable to companies.
  • analyze how certain types of data are used by companies.
  • learn three strategies to limit individual data collection by companies.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7)
Title: The Four Factors of Fair Use
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/the-four-factors-of-fair-use
Description:

Kids can be voracious consumers -- and creators -- of media, and it's easier than ever for them to find and share digital content online. But do middle-schoolers know about concepts like fair use, copyright, and public domain? Give students a framework they can use to better understand how fair use works in the real world.

Students will be able to:
  • define the terms "copyright," "public domain," and "fair use".
  • identify the purpose of the Four Factors of Fair Use.
  • apply fair use to real-world examples, making a case for or against.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 16 :
10) Describe the causes and effects of illegal use of intellectual property as it relates to print and digital media, considering copyright, fair use, licensing, sharing, and attribution.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Be Legal and Fair
URL: https://www.remc.org/21Things4Students/21/be-legal--fair/
Description:

Technology has brought about a potential crisis. It seems that a lot of artwork, literature, and music by our most creative authors, musicians, and artists have fallen into the hands of pirates. Our artists can no longer support themselves nor feel safe in creating new work. Their work is being shared all over the Internet as we speak. We need to put a stop to this. What would happen if your favorite musicians stopped writing and publishing their music? Do you want to listen to the music of your grandparents? That's where this assignment comes in.

For this activity, you will find out what we can do to make sure creative work remains under proper control. You will investigate the laws of copyright and report your findings back to your teacher. You will also need to find out if there is a way to legitimately use the work done by others so that you are not accused of operating illegally. Your assignment includes spreading the word so that others know the rules. When you have made a creative work of your own you will check it for originality and you will also learn of a way to protect that work so that you will be assured you are given proper credit for a job well done.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

When you have completed this activity you will:

1. know about copyright and fair use [Digital Citizen]
2. understand the social responsibility of using copyrighted materials [Digital Citizen]
3. know how to recognize and avoid plagiarism [Digital Citizen]
4. know how to use creative commons licenses [Digital Citizen]



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 19 :
13) Define personal privacy, digital footprint, and open communication.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

[DLIT] (8) 18 :
12) Cite evidence of the positive and negative effects of data permanence on personal and professional digital identity.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Social Networking
URL: https://www.remc.org/21Things4Students/21/14-social-networking/
Description:

A social network is an online community of people who use a website or app to communicate with each other by sharing comments, images, videos, resources, etc. Common examples include Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat. Using social networks can be a lot of fun and help us feel connected with the people we care most about. Adults also use social networks to share resources and look for jobs, while seniors and shut-ins benefit from being able to stay in touch with relatives and friends. 


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

When you have completed these activities you will:​

  1. know what a social network is [Empowered Learner]

  2. understand why it is important to manage your digital identity when using a social network [Digital Citizen]

  3. understand why it is important to navigate social networks safely and post thoughtfully [Digital Citizen]

  4. be able to create a set of personal guidelines for navigating social networks [Digital Citizen]



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: The Daily Dilemma: David
URL: https://www.goodcharacter.com/dilemma29/
Description:

This website provides a case study for student evaluation, either through writing or discussion. This case study will focus on the safe use of digital devices and ethical sharing. The case study is as follows: David has just joined a Facebook group and he discovers that somebody has posted an offensive and malicious photo of a girl from his class. David feels very uncomfortable about it. What, if anything, should he do?



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (8) 18 :
12) Cite evidence of the positive and negative effects of data permanence on personal and professional digital identity.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 8)
Title: Being Aware of What You Share
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/being-aware-of-what-you-share
Description:

Kids share a lot of information whenever they go online -- sometimes on purpose, sometimes not. But do they understand that online privacy isn't just what they say and post? Help your students learn about their digital footprints and the steps they can take to shape what others find and see about them.

Students will be able to:
- Reflect on the concept of privacy, including what they feel comfortable sharing and with which people.
- Analyze different ways that advertisers collect information about users to send them targeted ads.
- Identify strategies for protecting their privacy, including opting out of specific features and analyzing app or website privacy policies.

Available in both English and Spanish.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 18 :
12) Discuss the impact of data permanence on digital identity including best practices to protect personal digital footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7)
Title: The Power of Digital Footprints
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/the-power-of-digital-footprints
Description:

What others find about us online shapes who they think we are and how they feel about us. But do kids know what kinds of tracks they've already left? Help your students learn about their digital footprints and the steps they can take in the future to shape what others find and see about them online.

Students will be able to:

Resources available in both English and Spanish.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: The Ten Commandments of Computer Ethics
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nt36F-1fd6U&feature=youtu.be
Description:

This video explains ten commandments of computer ethics. Students will learn the thou shalt NOTS of computer practices. The wording is more appropriate for high school students, but can easily be used with middle school students, especially with class discussion. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 1 Lesson 7: Intellectual Property and Images
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/7/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson covers how to use media such as images, video, or music created by others on a website. In addition, students will respect the rights of the creator of that media by reviewing content permissions. After first studying Creative Commons licensing, the class learns how to add images to web pages, and how to give proper attribution when doing so.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 2 Lesson 13: RGB Colors and Classes
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/13/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson covers classes and custom colors. The class first learns how to specify custom colors using RGB (red, green, blue) values, then applies these colors to a new Four Seasons web page, which uses CSS classes. Using classes, the class adds more styles to the Four Seasons web page, then uses them to style their personal websites.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 2 Lesson 14: Project - Personal Portfolio Website
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/14/puzzle/1
Description:

In the last few days of the unit, the class finalizes their personal websites, working with peers to get feedback. Then, the students will review the rubric and put the finishing touches on the site. To cap off the unit, everyone shares their projects and how they were developed.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 16 :
10) Describe the causes and effects of illegal use of intellectual property as it relates to print and digital media, considering copyright, fair use, licensing, sharing, and attribution.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 1 Lesson 9: Project - Multi-Page Website
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/9/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson covers hyperlinks, which allow web developers to connect pages together into one website. The class will link together all the previous pages into one project and create navigation bars for each page before publishing the entire site to the Web.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 2 Chapter 2 Lesson 11: Styling Elements with CSS
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd2-2018/stage/11/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson continues the introduction to CSS style properties, this time focusing more on non-text elements. The class begins by investigating and modifying the new CSS styles on a "Desserts of the World" page. Afterward, everyone applies this new knowledge to their personal websites.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 26

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