ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Net Neutrality and Freedom of the Press in a Digital Age
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/decaaed7-5e81-4638-94f0-1251c032c448/net-neutrality-and-freedom-of-the-press-in-a-digital-age-mediashift/
Description:

A recent court decision, which struck down the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order and threatened the future of Net Neutrality, has huge implications for the future of journalism and press freedom. This informational material can be used during a lesson on identifying laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Net Neutrality Rules Ensure Equal Access to the Internet
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ac6d797b-df87-4aca-93ad-f026e9c280e5/net-neutrality-rules-ensure-equal-access-to-the-internet/
Description:

Discover the FCC's verdict on free and open Internet with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 26, 2015.

Note: please watch the segment of the video from 1:24-1:56, which addresses net neutrality.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Technology: Will End of Net Neutrality Rules Impact Future Innovation?
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/144e9649-bd67-40be-a9ab-22d6492f4e27/technology-will-end-of-net-neutrality-rules-impact-future-innovation-video/
Description:

The FCC's net neutrality rules were adopted to guarantee equal access to all sites on the Internet. But an appeals court ruling releases broadband providers from those guidelines, allowing them to prioritize certain traffic.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Consumers Speak Up on Net Neutrality
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b46db993-fa3e-4e3a-acc4-44e3dcd27429/consumers-speak-up-on-net-neutrality/
Description:

Discover how the net neutrality debate could affect consumers with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from September 15, 2014. This video comes with a student viewing guide.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (9) 20 :
20 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-10.1]

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.9-10.1a]

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. [W.9-10.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.9-10.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.9-10.1e]

[ELA2015] (10) 21 :
21 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-10.1]

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.9-10.1a]

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. [W.9-10.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.9-10.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.9-10.1e]

[ELA2015] (11) 19 :
19 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.11-12.1]

a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.11-12.1a]

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. [W.11-12.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.11-12.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.11-12.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.11-12.1e]

[ELA2015] (12) 19 :
19 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.11-12.1]

a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.11-12.1a]

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. [W.11-12.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.11-12.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.11-12.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.11-12.1e]

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: English Language Arts (9 - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Net Neutrality Debate
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/38566355-b748-4de2-955a-167b418e6ad2/the-net-neutrality-debate-moyers-on-america/
Description:

In this lesson, students will write a persuasive one-page editorial that takes a position in the Net Neutrality debate.

Lesson Objectives



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: How Russia Used Social Media to Meddle in the 2016 Election and Undermine U.S. Democracy
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/cybersecurity-threat-kqed/the-lowdown-how-russia-used-social-media-to-meddle-in-the-2016-election-and-undermine-us-democracy-lesson-plan/
Description:

Companies routinely track our activities online -- what we search, what we buy, what videos we watch, and what we post to social media. And while most of the time this tracking is used for targeted ads, our information can be bought and used by people in order to influence our opinions about issues or political candidates through not-so-scrupulous methods. In this Lowdown lesson, students will analyze cybersecurity risks, how information about their online activity is monitored and used, and ways they can protect their privacy online.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (8) 22 :
16) Present content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Example: Create and share a help video for a senior's center that provides tips for online safety.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Intellectual Property and Trademarks
URL: https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/kids/icreatm_guide_hs.pdf
Description:

The lesson begins on page 26 of the document accessed via the resource link.

Students will:

- be able to define the term "trademark".

- categorize products as generic or brand name.

- identify popular trademarks.

- identify symbols associated with the protection of trademarks.

- utilize a trademark database. 

- create a custom trademark and present it to the class. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Intellectual Property and Copyright
URL: https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/kids/icreatm_guide_hs.pdf
Description:

Lesson begins on page 34 of the document accessed via the resource link.

Students will:

- understand how copyright laws apply to creative works of authorship.

- create a work to be registered.

- define the terms: copyright, public domain, plagiarism.

- identify where on websites copyright notices are displayed and what information is included with the notice.

- identify what copyright does not protect.

-learn how to register a copyright notice.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 27 :
21) Explain how technology facilitates the disruption of traditional institutions and services.

Examples: Digital currencies, ridesharing, autonomous vehicles, retail, Internet of Things.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Debating the Privacy Line
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/debating-the-privacy-line
Description:

Often, the more information we have, the better decisions we're able to make. The power of data can benefit both individuals and governments. But who can be trusted with the responsibility of having all this data? Can governments collect and use it fairly and without violating our privacy? Help students think through this question and become thoughtful influencers of data policy and practice.

Students will be able to:
  • Identify the pros and cons of schools having access to students' social media.
  • Describe the concerns related to government access to social media and cellphone data, including those related to free speech and privacy.
  • Choose a position for or against government access to social media and cellphone data, and support that position with reasons and examples.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 17 :
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

[DLIT] (8) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (8) 17 :
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

[DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 24 :
18) Explain the beneficial and harmful effects that intellectual property laws can have on innovation.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 12)
Title: Intellectual Property Theft
URL: https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/kids/icreatm_guide_hs.pdf
Description:

The lesson begins on page 43 of the document accessed via the resource link.

Students will:

- identify different types of media as intellectual property: writings, music, videos, computer games, etc.

-understand that intellectual property laws protect online and offline material.

-understand that it is stealing from real people if one copies copyright-protected material or downloads material from the internet without permission.

-understand it is against the law to download copyright-protected videos, music, etc. from the internet without permission.

- investigate famous cases of trade secret theft.

- investigate peer-to-peer networks.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Case Study: True Threats or Venting? (2015)
URL: https://newseumed.org/tools/lesson-plan/case-study-true-threats-or-venting-2015
Description:

Students will review a court case and case study to determine what is protected and what may not be. 

Elonis v. the United States provides the foundation for a debate on what forms of expression on social media are and are not protected by the First Amendment — and the blurry line in-between.

To access this free resource, you will need a free account. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

[DLIT] (9-12) 29 :
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Your Information Footprint is Larger Than You Think
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-1-youre-leaving-footprints/
Description:

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Your information is larger than you think”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student lesson is available at https://teachingprivacy.org/youre-leaving-footprints/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their online and offline activities contribute to their information “footprint”; students can use privacy settings and critical thinking skills to limit the exposure of their footprint.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Students can give examples of ways their online and offline activities generate digital footprints, within each of the following broad categories: intentional posting/online activities, metadata attached to posts, information transmitted by devices, and others collecting or posting information about them.
  2. For at least one example of an activity that generates digital footprints, students can explain (at least in non-technical terms) how that activity generates those footprints.
  3. Students can enumerate some factors that affect how many people or entities can see the data in their information footprint, including (minimally) privacy settings and third-party data sharing, and give examples of potential negative consequences of exposure.
  4. Students can explain how the amount of information available about them, and how many people have access to it, is affected by the mining of data from different sources to form a picture of each person and can give examples of inferences that can be drawn by data-mining.
  5. Students can give examples of available privacy settings for apps, online services, and devices they use frequently, and explain why they would choose particular settings based on their information-sharing preferences.
  6. Students can suggest some potential uses apps and online services might have for particular types of personal data they typically request access to and evaluate whether those uses would likely be beneficial, neutral, or harmful to the student.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Information is Valuable
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-3-information-is-valuable/
Description:

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Information about you on the Internet will be used by somebody in their interest — including against you”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/information-is-valuable/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can give examples of how their data may be used to benefit others; students can investigate and evaluate how different online services use data, in order to make informed choices.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Students can give examples of personal data that services or sites may share with other services or companies, and examples of how those “third parties” may use that data. Examples should include both information they explicitly post and supposedly hidden information.
  2. Students can give examples of how having their personal data might benefit any of the following: friends/family, acquaintances, businesses, institutions, governments, and cybercriminals.
  3. Students can explain the business model that allows companies that provide free or cheap online services to make money by selling consumer data to advertisers and/or data brokers.
  4. Students can explain the difference between “opt-in” and “opt-out” models for information sharing, and relate those models to the lack of comprehensive laws regulating data sharing by companies, institutions, or governments.
  5. Student can investigate how online services use data and who they share it with, and explain how they would use this information in choosing which services to use and which data to give those services access to.
  6. Students can identify potential consequences of choosing particular privacy settings on apps, sites, and devices, in terms of how their data could be used by the parties who can see it — and whether those uses would likely be beneficial, neutral, or detrimental to themselves.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 19 :
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

[DLIT] (9-12) 35 :
29) Summarize the role of compression and encryption in modifying the structure of digital artifacts and the varieties of information carried in the metadata of these artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 36 :
30) Evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.

Examples: Client server, peer-to-peer, cloud computing.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Someone Could Listen
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-4-someone-could-listen/
Description:

Unencrypted communication over the Internet works a lot like sending a postcard: it can be read by anybody along the delivery route. Communication is routed through intermediary computers and systems, which are connected to many more computers and systems. Encryption, or encoding information so it appears scrambled to anyone who doesn’t know the key, is a way to wrap a postcard in an envelope. While it can never be 100% secure, stronger encryption makes it harder for people to get to the contents.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Communication over a network, unless strongly encrypted, is never just between two parties”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/someone-could-listen/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate how the multi-step, multi-party pathways of networked communication affect users’ privacy; students can identify and use more secure communication options.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can describe how intermediary devices, and the services that provide them, are involved in transmitting information from point A to point B on the Internet.
  2. Students can explain how the interconnected, many-layered structure of the Internet affects the security and privacy of online communication.
  3. Students can identify the difference between a private network and a shared network and can describe some of the potential risks of using a shared network.
  4. Students can describe how encryption decreases the chances of outside parties infiltrating private communications and accessing private information.
  5. Students can explain why their security depends (in part) on their own decisions and behavior.
  6. Students can give some examples of common encryption protocols, identify what layer of an electronic communication each of those protocols protects, and describe how they would verify that those protocols were being used.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 25 :
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Search Is Improving
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-6-search-is-improving/
Description:

Every day more data is being put online. Search engines are getting better, allowing “deeper” the searching of more types of data. Techniques for extracting and connecting information from different sources are getting more powerful. Furthermore, information that is not retrievable today may be retrievable tomorrow due to changes in terms of service, public policy, law, and technical privacy settings.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Just because something can’t be found today, doesn’t mean it can’t be found tomorrow.” They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/search-is-improving/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain how changes in technology and regulations can affect who has access to their data; students can use techniques to monitor and limit the exposure of their data.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students can describe (in general terms) how a search engine works, including that results are constantly being refreshed to include new information and that the search engine itself is continually updated to deal with newer types of information.
  2. Students can provide examples of offline data that can be digitized and put online.
  3. Students can give example scenarios describing how changes to laws and regulations could affect the availability of personal information.
  4. Students can briefly summarize the purpose of privacy policies and the effects that their ever-changing nature has on users’ privacy.
  5. Students can investigate what information about them is available online, and assess which types of information — social, financial, etc. — are currently available to different entities.
  6. Students can monitor changes in privacy policies and default privacy settings and evaluate how those changes might affect who can see what information about them.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[DLIT] (9-12) 18 :
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

[DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 23 :
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

[DLIT] (9-12) 26 :
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Identity Isn’t Guaranteed
URL: https://teachingprivacy.org/module-8-identity-isnt-guaranteed/
Description:

Creating an identity on the Internet or impersonating somebody else is often just a matter of a few clicks. Currently, there is no foolproof way to match a real person with their online identity. This means that you can never be sure with whom you are communicating and that someone could steal your online identity and impersonate you!

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle: “Identity is not guaranteed on the Internet”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/identity-isnt-guaranteed/.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain why it is difficult to be sure who one is communicating with online; students can investigate and evaluate the legitimacy of services that want their personal information.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can give examples of potential consequences of disclosing information online if the entity they’re sharing it with isn’t who they say they are.
  2. Students can give examples of “weak points” that might allow someone to steal their identity, and examples of what that person could do with the stolen identity to compromise their privacy.
  3. Students can explain how “phishing” works, and describe how they should respond to messages they suspect of phishing.
  4. Students can give examples of methods they could use to verify someone’s identity online and can explain the shortcomings of those methods.
  5. Students can give examples of methods they could use to verify the authenticity of apps, sites, and services that request their personal information, and can explain the shortcomings of those methods.
  6. Students can describe some of the basic precautions they can take to keep their accounts secure from hackers and identity thieves.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 11 :
5) Cite media and/or owners of digital content at an age-appropriate level.

Example: Basic website citation.

[DLIT] (6) 16 :
10) Describe the causes and effects of illegal use of intellectual property as it relates to print and digital media, considering copyright, fair use, licensing, sharing, and attribution.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 12)
Title: Teaching Students to Legally Use Images Online
URL: https://www.cultofpedagogy.com/online-images/
Description:

As our students create more and more digital products—blog posts, videos, podcasts, e-books—they should be using images to enhance them. Images grab an audience’s attention, they can illustrate key concepts, set a certain tone, and present a more complete understanding of the ideas you’re putting out there.

And the internet is absolutely teeming with images students can grab and use in a matter of seconds. But in most cases, they SHOULD NOT GRAB. Despite the fact that these images are easy to get, using them may be illegal.

Use the information in this blog post to teach students to either create their own images or legally use images found online, including proper citation. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 20 :
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 38 :
32) Use data analysis tools and techniques to identify patterns in data representing complex systems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Forensics
URL: https://www.txcte.org/resource/lesson-plan-computer-forensics
Description:

In this lesson, students will discuss computer forensics and complete an activity in which they will process an electronic crime scene. Students will understand how computers and other electronic data storage devices leave the footprints and data trails of their users.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 8: The Internet Is for Everyone (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit1/8/
Description:

This lesson sets the stage for why we want to learn about how the Internet works. First, students share what they currently know about how the Internet works through a KWL activity. Then, students watch a short video that introduces Vint Cerf and the Internet at a high level. Students skim a memo written to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) by Vint Cerf in 2002 entitled “The Internet is for Everyone”, which calls out a series of threats to the prospect that the Internet should be an open, easily and cheaply accessible resource for everyone on the planet. Finally, we foreshadow the practice of PT at the end of the unit. Many of the questions and challenges raised by Vint Cerf still apply today, and students will be asked to research and present on one for the Practice PT.

The purpose of this lesson is to set up and motivate students to be receptive to learning about some of the technical aspects of how the Internet functions. We want the message to be clear that a huge part of being able to solve these problems, or even to function as an informed citizen, is to be educated about how the Internet actually works as a system that is built, engineered, and maintained by people.

It is both interesting and important to know that the protocols or rules by which Internet traffic is governed are not owned or controlled by any government or business (at the moment). It’s a group of well-meaning citizen-engineers dedicated to keeping the Internet free, open and robust for all.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the group of mostly volunteer citizens that proposes and develops all of the standards and protocols that exist on the Internet. Request for Comments (RFC) documents, like the one we use in the lesson, is how these standards and protocols are defined and published for all to see on the IETF website. They are some of the best-written technical documents in existence.

And with a little background in how bits work, what’s necessary for protocols to work when bits are transferred over wires, they are relatively accessible reading. Here’s the full set: https://www.ietf.org/rfc.html. RFC 000 (the first one) is related to what we ask students to do in the next several lessons.

Students will be able to:
- connect a personal experience to one challenge related to the idea that "The Internet is for Everyone".
- cite one example of how computing has a global effect -- both beneficial and harmful -- on people and society.
- explain that the Internet is a distributed global system that works on shared and open protocols.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (9-12) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (9-12) 11 :
5) Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using current events.

[DLIT] (9-12) 22 :
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

[DLIT] (9-12) 32 :
26) Use collaborative technologies to work with others including peers, experts, or community members to examine local, national, and global issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12)
Title: Computer Science Principles Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 14: Practice PT - The Internet and Society (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit1/14/
Description:

This lesson is a capstone to the Internet unit. Students will research and prepare a flash talk about an issue facing society: either Net Neutrality or Internet Censorship. Developing an informed opinion about these issues hinges on an understanding of how the Internet functions as a system. Students will prepare and deliver a flash talk that should combine forming an opinion about the issue and an exhibition of their knowledge of the internet.

This lesson is good practice for certain elements of the AP Explore Performance Task. The primary things practiced here are: doing a bit of research about impacts of computing (though here it’s specifically about the Internet), explaining some technical details related to ideas in computer science, and connecting these ideas to global and social impacts. Students will practice synthesizing information, and presenting their learning in a flash talk.

Note: This is NOT the official AP® Performance Task that will be submitted as part of the Advanced Placement exam; it is a practice activity intended to prepare students for some portions of their individual performance at a later time.

This lesson has dual purposes of honing "rapid research" skills and tying a temporary bow on the Internet Unit.

The act of doing "rapid research" is one that will come up over and over again in this course. We want to build students' confidence and skills in researching topic using a variety of sources. In the case of this lesson we want students to read articles on the issues but scan for the terms and vocabulary they know like: IP, DNS, HTTP, routing, packets, scaling, redundancy, and reliability. We want students to be able to explain with some level of technical proficiency how these things work as well as the potential beneficial and harmful effects.

Net Neutrality and Internet Censorship are related issues having to do with organizations attempting to control internet traffic for a variety of reasons. There are many other large societal issues and dilemmas related to the Internet besides these that like: big data, surveillance, security, and encryption. We address these issues in Unit 4: Big Data and Privacy. For this practice PT, we want to keep the focus on issues that relate more directly to the systems and protocols

Students will be able to:
- research a global impact of the Internet.
- create and present a flash talk on a global impact of the Internet.
- analyze the relationship of an Internet technology to the impact.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 20

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