ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (4) 22 :
4.8.1) Describe health advocacy strategies.

Examples: writing and recording public service announcements for school or community broadcasts, writing letter or email to editors of local media

[HE] (7) 16 :
7.5.1) Distinguish when a self-decision should be made or if help should be sought from a responsible adult.

Examples: friends begin drinking, unsafe situation arises at school, suicidal friend, suspected abuse, seat belt use, suicidal thoughts

a. Determine when it is necessary to ask for assistance when making a health choice.

Examples: friend begins to self-harm, negative peer pressure

[HE] HED (9-12) 21 :
HE.4.4) Demonstrate how to ask for and offer assistance to enhance the health of self and others.

Examples: accessing crisis hotlines for suicide, sexual and physical abuse, and human trafficking; community resource materials

Subject: Health Education (4 - 12)
Title: Organizational and Self-Advocacy Strategies
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/49103ad9-aed4-4675-b9bd-691d8de80c91/49103ad9-aed4-4675-b9bd-691d8de80c91/
Description:

Listen to math and special needs teachers discuss the strategies geared toward teaching students organizational skills. Learn how to promote self-advocacy among special needs students (such as asking for help when needed).  This video can be played when teaching a lesson on how to ask for assistance for yourself and others.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 1 :
6.1.1) Describe the interrelationship between social and emotional health in adolescence.

a. . Identify how positive relationships can enhance each dimension of health.

b. Explain how stress can affect personal health.

[HE] (6) 16 :
6.5.1) Describe situations that can help or hinder making a healthy decision.

Examples: socio-economic status, access to medical services, availability of healthful foods, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] (7) 3 :
7.1.3) Determine barriers to practicing healthy behaviors.

Examples: lack of finances, access to health services, social support

a. Examine how nutritional choices and psychological issues may lead to eating disorders.

[HE] (7) 16 :
7.5.1) Distinguish when a self-decision should be made or if help should be sought from a responsible adult.

Examples: friends begin drinking, unsafe situation arises at school, suicidal friend, suspected abuse, seat belt use, suicidal thoughts

a. Determine when it is necessary to ask for assistance when making a health choice.

Examples: friend begins to self-harm, negative peer pressure

[HE] (8) 1 :
8.1.1) Explain how emotional, intellectual, physical, spiritual, mental, and social health affect each other.

a. Determine how social influences can affect physical health.

b. Describe how risky health behaviors affect the emotional, physical, and social health of adolescents.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 8)
Title: What is Trauma? - You Are Not Alone
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ket-pd-yana5/what-is-trauma/
Description:

A researcher and psychotherapist explains how trauma affects children and teens and describes what can be done to help. Ginny Sprang, Ph.D., executive director of the Center on Trauma and Children at the University of Kentucky, explains how psychiatrists define trauma. Trauma can include direct exposure to physical or sexual harm, witnessing such harm, learning about a life-altering event such as a parent’s death, or repeated exposure to details of a traumatic event.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 11 :
6.3.1) Analyze the validity of a variety of Internet sources for health information.

Examples: valid sites -.edu (education), .org (non-profit), or .gov (government); unreliable health information sites - .com (commercial)

a. Identify local resources for reliable health information.

Examples: public health agencies, school nurse, health education teacher

[HE] (7) 16 :
7.5.1) Distinguish when a self-decision should be made or if help should be sought from a responsible adult.

Examples: friends begin drinking, unsafe situation arises at school, suicidal friend, suspected abuse, seat belt use, suicidal thoughts

a. Determine when it is necessary to ask for assistance when making a health choice.

Examples: friend begins to self-harm, negative peer pressure

Subject: Health Education (6 - 7)
Title: Adults You Know and Trust can Help You
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/4c3ba94d-6015-46e7-8abf-8575bd613c14/4c3ba94d-6015-46e7-8abf-8575bd613c14/
Description:

Sometimes we see something on the Internet that makes us feel uncomfortable. When this happens, you need to tell an adult you trust. An adult you trust might be your mom and dad, guardian, older brother or sister, teacher, school counselor, principal, police officer, grandparent, uncle or aunt. This video can be played during a lesson on seeking reliable health information.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 16 :
6.5.1) Describe situations that can help or hinder making a healthy decision.

Examples: socio-economic status, access to medical services, availability of healthful foods, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] (6) 17 :
6.5.2) Distinguish between healthy and unhealthy alternatives to health-related issues or problems.

Example: role-playing healthy ways to express anger and frustration

[HE] (7) 16 :
7.5.1) Distinguish when a self-decision should be made or if help should be sought from a responsible adult.

Examples: friends begin drinking, unsafe situation arises at school, suicidal friend, suspected abuse, seat belt use, suicidal thoughts

a. Determine when it is necessary to ask for assistance when making a health choice.

Examples: friend begins to self-harm, negative peer pressure

[HE] (7) 17 :
7.5.2) Analyze healthy alternatives over unhealthy alternatives when making decisions.

Examples: eating regular meals vs. skipping meals, choosing healthy snacks vs. junk food, getting proper exercise vs. too much screen time

[HE] (8) 16 :
8.5.1) Predict the impact on self and others when making a health-related decision.

Examples: following a time-management plan, walking to school, limiting caffeine intake, riding with an impaired driver

a. Analyze options as well as outcomes, when pressured by peers to perform illegal acts.

Examples: underage drinking leading to being arrested, injury or death when not wearing a seat belt, riding a motorcycle without a helmet resulting in head injury

[HE] (8) 17 :
8.5.2) Critique the positive and negative outcomes of a health-related decision.

Examples: positive -- keeping calendar to manage time, reading food labels, getting adequate sleep
negative -- tobacco use, eating disorders, drug use

Subject: Health Education (6 - 8)
Title: Healthy Decision Making
URL: https://www.rightdecisionsrightnow.com/activity/grades-8-9/activity-8-decisions-decisions/
Description:

This learning activity provides a role-play scenario for students to apply the decision-making steps outlined in various situations and scenarios. Small groups of students determine lists of options, consequences, and decisions for each hypothetical situation. A digital activity link is included for use.

This alignment results from the ALEX Health/PE COS Resource Alignment Summit.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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