ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 21 :
6.7.2) Describe practices to avoid to reduce health risks to self and others.

Examples: smoking or vaping, drinking alcohol, using illegal drugs, texting while driving

[HE] (7) 2 :
7.1.2) Predict the risk of injury or illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: riding in the bed of a pick-up truck, biking without a helmet, riding without a seat belt

a. Give examples of dangers associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 10 :
7.2.5) Discuss how risky choices influence the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors, including tobacco use increasing the risk of using other drugs and peer pressure to consume alcohol.

[HE] (8) 3 :
8.1.3) Create a plan for eliminating personal unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: inappropriate use of needles, tobacco use, physical inactivity, sexual contact, alcohol consumption, inadequate sleep

[HE] (8) 9 :
8.2.4) Explain how societal perceptions influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: acceptance of teenage smoking and teenage pregnancy by peers, certain communities, and cultures

[HE] (8) 10 :
8.2.5) Give examples of how substance abuse can increase the likelihood of other health risk behaviors.

Examples: alcohol consumption lowering inhibitions, e-cigarettes or vaping leading to smoking

[HE] (8) 17 :
8.5.2) Critique the positive and negative outcomes of a health-related decision.

Examples: positive -- keeping calendar to manage time, reading food labels, getting adequate sleep
negative -- tobacco use, eating disorders, drug use

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

[HE] HED (9-12) 10 :
HE.2.3) Analyze how the perceptions of norms influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: addressing topics such as wearing safety equipment, teen pregnancy, drug abuse, suicide, cyber-bullying, weight management, potentially dangerous social media trends

[HE] HED (9-12) 12 :
HE.2.5) Analyze how some health risk behaviors can influence the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: assessing the effects of driving under the influence, drinking alcohol which can lead to poor choices such as sexual behavior, poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] HED (9-12) 23 :
HE.5.2) Develop a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related situations.

a. Predict the potential short-term and long-term impact of various alternatives on self and others.

b. Identify warning signs of suicide in self and others and discuss effective coping skills.

c. Demonstrate refusal skills and explain when to use them in high risk situations.

Examples: Saying no to sex, alcohol, and other drugs

[HE] HED (9-12) 29 :
HE.7.1) Analyze the role of individual responsibility for enhancing health.

a. Describe healthy practices and behaviors that will maintain or improve the health of self and others.

Examples: effective communication skills and safety techniques, reading and understanding medicine labels, immunizations, wellness checkups and compliance

b. Identify negative behaviors that increase health risks to self and others.

Examples: distracted driving, drinking and driving, illegal drug use, vaping, smoking, unprotected sex, behaviors resulting in intentional or unintentional injuries, poor eating habits, physical inactivity

c. Compare and contrast the responsibilities of both parents in teen parenting.

Examples: shared responsibilities; social, financial and educational challenges

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 2 :
HA.2.1) Analyze how health risk behaviors in the local school and community are influenced by family, peers and other factors.

Examples: availability of alcohol and drugs; trends in adolescent sexual behavior; availability of fast food; access to fitness and recreational facilities.

[HE] HA (10-12) 5 :
HA.5.1) Identify decision-making skills used in situations that put adolescents and teens at risk.

Examples: recording a fight and posting it on a social media; seeing a friend smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol; hearing a friend talk about shoplifting; hearing plans about a weekend party that will include drugs and/or alcohol; pressure to have sexual relations

a. Identify consequences of making poor decisions to join in or ignore risky situations.

b. Recognize the differences between situations in which one has control vs. a lack of control.

c. Review the importance of successfully managing decision-making skills when confronted with uncomfortable, risky, or dangerous situations.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: Project ALERT Core Lesson 3: Drinking Consequences and Alternatives
URL: https://s3.amazonaws.com/project_alert/assets/0/947/pa_core_3%202021.pdf
Description:

Each day, America’s teenagers are bombarded with misleading messages about drugs. Glamorized by media and endorsed by peers, the consequences of drug use and experimentation are dangerously disguised, and often hidden altogether. The reality is that drug use can alter a teen’s life forever. That’s why every student should be given the tools to make a decision against using drugs - and the best place to give them those tools is your classroom.

This resource is lesson 3. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 21 :
6.7.2) Describe practices to avoid to reduce health risks to self and others.

Examples: smoking or vaping, drinking alcohol, using illegal drugs, texting while driving

[HE] (7) 2 :
7.1.2) Predict the risk of injury or illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: riding in the bed of a pick-up truck, biking without a helmet, riding without a seat belt

a. Give examples of dangers associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 10 :
7.2.5) Discuss how risky choices influence the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors, including tobacco use increasing the risk of using other drugs and peer pressure to consume alcohol.

[HE] (8) 3 :
8.1.3) Create a plan for eliminating personal unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: inappropriate use of needles, tobacco use, physical inactivity, sexual contact, alcohol consumption, inadequate sleep

[HE] (8) 10 :
8.2.5) Give examples of how substance abuse can increase the likelihood of other health risk behaviors.

Examples: alcohol consumption lowering inhibitions, e-cigarettes or vaping leading to smoking

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

[HE] HED (9-12) 12 :
HE.2.5) Analyze how some health risk behaviors can influence the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: assessing the effects of driving under the influence, drinking alcohol which can lead to poor choices such as sexual behavior, poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] HED (9-12) 23 :
HE.5.2) Develop a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related situations.

a. Predict the potential short-term and long-term impact of various alternatives on self and others.

b. Identify warning signs of suicide in self and others and discuss effective coping skills.

c. Demonstrate refusal skills and explain when to use them in high risk situations.

Examples: Saying no to sex, alcohol, and other drugs

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 2 :
HA.2.1) Analyze how health risk behaviors in the local school and community are influenced by family, peers and other factors.

Examples: availability of alcohol and drugs; trends in adolescent sexual behavior; availability of fast food; access to fitness and recreational facilities.

[HE] HA (10-12) 5 :
HA.5.1) Identify decision-making skills used in situations that put adolescents and teens at risk.

Examples: recording a fight and posting it on a social media; seeing a friend smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol; hearing a friend talk about shoplifting; hearing plans about a weekend party that will include drugs and/or alcohol; pressure to have sexual relations

a. Identify consequences of making poor decisions to join in or ignore risky situations.

b. Recognize the differences between situations in which one has control vs. a lack of control.

c. Review the importance of successfully managing decision-making skills when confronted with uncomfortable, risky, or dangerous situations.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: What Is Alcohol Use Disorder?
URL: https://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/alcohol
Description:

Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences. AUD ranges from mild to severe. Underage drinking is drinking alcohol before a person turns age 21, which is the minimum legal drinking age in the United States. Underage drinking is a serious problem, as you may have seen from your friends or your own experiences. Alcohol is the most commonly used substance of use among young people in America, and drinking when you’re underage puts your health and safety at risk.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (7) 2 :
7.1.2) Predict the risk of injury or illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: riding in the bed of a pick-up truck, biking without a helmet, riding without a seat belt

a. Give examples of dangers associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 10 :
7.2.5) Discuss how risky choices influence the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors, including tobacco use increasing the risk of using other drugs and peer pressure to consume alcohol.

[HE] (8) 3 :
8.1.3) Create a plan for eliminating personal unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: inappropriate use of needles, tobacco use, physical inactivity, sexual contact, alcohol consumption, inadequate sleep

[HE] (8) 10 :
8.2.5) Give examples of how substance abuse can increase the likelihood of other health risk behaviors.

Examples: alcohol consumption lowering inhibitions, e-cigarettes or vaping leading to smoking

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

[HE] HED (9-12) 12 :
HE.2.5) Analyze how some health risk behaviors can influence the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: assessing the effects of driving under the influence, drinking alcohol which can lead to poor choices such as sexual behavior, poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] HED (9-12) 23 :
HE.5.2) Develop a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related situations.

a. Predict the potential short-term and long-term impact of various alternatives on self and others.

b. Identify warning signs of suicide in self and others and discuss effective coping skills.

c. Demonstrate refusal skills and explain when to use them in high risk situations.

Examples: Saying no to sex, alcohol, and other drugs

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (7 - 12)
Title: A Perspective on Surveying Student Attitudes and Behavior
URL: https://www.projectalert.com/teacher_tools/assessment-tools
Description:

The following survey contains questions regarding whether or not students have ever used various drugs, their current use patterns, and their attitudes and beliefs about drugs. If the survey is carefully administered and if students really feel assured of anonymity and confidentiality, you will get a good picture of the extent of drug use among young people in your school or community. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 21 :
6.7.2) Describe practices to avoid to reduce health risks to self and others.

Examples: smoking or vaping, drinking alcohol, using illegal drugs, texting while driving

[HE] (7) 2 :
7.1.2) Predict the risk of injury or illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: riding in the bed of a pick-up truck, biking without a helmet, riding without a seat belt

a. Give examples of dangers associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 10 :
7.2.5) Discuss how risky choices influence the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors, including tobacco use increasing the risk of using other drugs and peer pressure to consume alcohol.

[HE] (8) 3 :
8.1.3) Create a plan for eliminating personal unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: inappropriate use of needles, tobacco use, physical inactivity, sexual contact, alcohol consumption, inadequate sleep

[HE] (8) 10 :
8.2.5) Give examples of how substance abuse can increase the likelihood of other health risk behaviors.

Examples: alcohol consumption lowering inhibitions, e-cigarettes or vaping leading to smoking

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

[HE] HED (9-12) 12 :
HE.2.5) Analyze how some health risk behaviors can influence the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: assessing the effects of driving under the influence, drinking alcohol which can lead to poor choices such as sexual behavior, poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] HED (9-12) 23 :
HE.5.2) Develop a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related situations.

a. Predict the potential short-term and long-term impact of various alternatives on self and others.

b. Identify warning signs of suicide in self and others and discuss effective coping skills.

c. Demonstrate refusal skills and explain when to use them in high risk situations.

Examples: Saying no to sex, alcohol, and other drugs

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 2 :
HA.2.1) Analyze how health risk behaviors in the local school and community are influenced by family, peers and other factors.

Examples: availability of alcohol and drugs; trends in adolescent sexual behavior; availability of fast food; access to fitness and recreational facilities.

[HE] HA (10-12) 5 :
HA.5.1) Identify decision-making skills used in situations that put adolescents and teens at risk.

Examples: recording a fight and posting it on a social media; seeing a friend smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol; hearing a friend talk about shoplifting; hearing plans about a weekend party that will include drugs and/or alcohol; pressure to have sexual relations

a. Identify consequences of making poor decisions to join in or ignore risky situations.

b. Recognize the differences between situations in which one has control vs. a lack of control.

c. Review the importance of successfully managing decision-making skills when confronted with uncomfortable, risky, or dangerous situations.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: Project ALERT Knowledge Assessment Tool
URL: https://s3.amazonaws.com/project_alert/assets/0/685/Project%20ALERT%20Knowledge%20Assessment%20Tool%202016.pdf
Description:

This resource is a test bank of assessment items in True/False, Multiple Choice, and Short Answer formats that are provided for each of the Project ALERT Core (Lessons 1-11). You can choose from these items to create lesson-based assessments, a Project ALERT unit test, and/or for part of a course exam that may include an assessment of the students' success using the Project ALERT curriculum.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (6) 21 :
6.7.2) Describe practices to avoid to reduce health risks to self and others.

Examples: smoking or vaping, drinking alcohol, using illegal drugs, texting while driving

[HE] (7) 2 :
7.1.2) Predict the risk of injury or illness if engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: riding in the bed of a pick-up truck, biking without a helmet, riding without a seat belt

a. Give examples of dangers associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs.

[HE] (7) 8 :
7.2.3) Describe how the media can send mixed messages about health.

Examples: advertisements concerning tobacco, alcohol, and nutrition

[HE] (7) 10 :
7.2.5) Discuss how risky choices influence the likelihood of unhealthy behaviors, including tobacco use increasing the risk of using other drugs and peer pressure to consume alcohol.

[HE] (8) 3 :
8.1.3) Create a plan for eliminating personal unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: inappropriate use of needles, tobacco use, physical inactivity, sexual contact, alcohol consumption, inadequate sleep

[HE] (8) 10 :
8.2.5) Give examples of how substance abuse can increase the likelihood of other health risk behaviors.

Examples: alcohol consumption lowering inhibitions, e-cigarettes or vaping leading to smoking

[HE] HED (9-12) 8 :
HE.2.1) Analyze the influence of external factors on health beliefs and behaviors.

a. Analyze how family, culture, school, and community influence the health practice and behaviors of individuals.

Examples: explaining how holiday celebrations and traditions such as over indulgence in eating and consuming alcohol affect health behaviors; explaining how extra-curricular activities and schedules result in over-consumption of fast food

b. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

c. Examine how peers influence healthy and unhealthy behaviors.

Example: influence of media on teen body image, sexual activity, drugs, alcohol, violence, cyber-bullying.

d. Cite evidence of how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

[HE] HED (9-12) 12 :
HE.2.5) Analyze how some health risk behaviors can influence the likelihood of engaging in unhealthy behaviors.

Examples: assessing the effects of driving under the influence, drinking alcohol which can lead to poor choices such as sexual behavior, poor nutrition, sedentary lifestyle

[HE] HED (9-12) 23 :
HE.5.2) Develop a thoughtful decision-making process in health-related situations.

a. Predict the potential short-term and long-term impact of various alternatives on self and others.

b. Identify warning signs of suicide in self and others and discuss effective coping skills.

c. Demonstrate refusal skills and explain when to use them in high risk situations.

Examples: Saying no to sex, alcohol, and other drugs

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 2 :
HA.2.1) Analyze how health risk behaviors in the local school and community are influenced by family, peers and other factors.

Examples: availability of alcohol and drugs; trends in adolescent sexual behavior; availability of fast food; access to fitness and recreational facilities.

[HE] HA (10-12) 5 :
HA.5.1) Identify decision-making skills used in situations that put adolescents and teens at risk.

Examples: recording a fight and posting it on a social media; seeing a friend smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol; hearing a friend talk about shoplifting; hearing plans about a weekend party that will include drugs and/or alcohol; pressure to have sexual relations

a. Identify consequences of making poor decisions to join in or ignore risky situations.

b. Recognize the differences between situations in which one has control vs. a lack of control.

c. Review the importance of successfully managing decision-making skills when confronted with uncomfortable, risky, or dangerous situations.

Subject: Health Education (6 - 12)
Title: Drug Facts Challenge!
URL: https://teens.drugabuse.gov/teens/games/drug-facts-challenge
Description:

A Jeopardy-style game of drug facts.

Drug Facts Challenge! is a Jeopardy-style game based on scientific findings developed by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The questions and answers are based on the NIDA for Teens Drug Facts pages. 

Play as a group or have students play individually. Allow time for teens to review the NIDA for Teens Drug Facts prior to playing. You can print out or have teens access the pages online. Another option is to display each of the Drug Facts on a large screen, allowing teens ample time to read and discuss. Then, use the same large screen to display and play the Drug Facts Challenge! game.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 14 :
HA.8.2) Lead or participate in community-wide health-related events.

Examples: Relay for Life, 5K run, Longest Day activities (Alzheimer's Association)

Subject: Health Education (9 - 12)
Title: How to Organize a 5K: A Guide to Planning Your First Race
URL: https://www.active.com/running/articles/how-to-organize-a-5k-a-guide-to-planning-your-first-race
Description:

This will direct you through everything one will need to know about organizing a 5K. This resource describes the process from inception to the finish line and beyond. Many times things can get overlooked during the planning process, especially for first time race directors. This website gives a good overview of all that is necessary to organize a successful run. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (8) 23 :
8.8.2) Work collaboratively to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and schools.

Examples: designing healthy recipes, supporting the school wellness policy, school newscasts, school newsletters

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (8 - 12)
Title: Peer Health Exchange: Steps to Advocate
URL: https://ikewg3fvxhz2omywi3xvrygd-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Steps-to-Advocate.pdf
Description:

This resource explains to students how to be an advocate. Teachers can print this resource out and display in the classroom or use it as visual to start a class discussion.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (9 - 12)
Title: Alcohol Abstinence Pledge
URL: https://www.alcoholproblemswi.org/alcohol-abstinence-pledge/
Description:
This is a Pledge of Safety and Wisdom: To Abstain from Alcohol
 
This pledge can be downloaded and signed by students or it can be used as a resource in creating a student-led alcohol abstinence pledge. 


   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] HA (10-12) 15 :
HA.8.3) Communicate to peer or community groups on health-related topics.

Subject: Health Education (9 - 12)
Title: Power Up With Problem-Solving!
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/power-up-with-problem-solving/girl-power/
Description:

Tyler is 17 years old and has a passion for helping people.  She lost her 4 grandparents to cancer and wanted to do something to help others.  She is strong in science and decided to use her science skills to help find a cure for cancer.  She volunteers at a hospital to provide some help and kindness to cancer patients.Tyler’s passion for serving others is huge and her problem solving science skills are helping to make an impact in her community. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (5) 8 :
5.2.1) Describe how the school and community can support personal health practices and behaviors.

a. Describe how positive and negative influences from family, peers, and culture affect adolescents' body acceptance during the changes of puberty.

[HE] (7) 12 :
7.3.2) Demonstrate the ability to locate valid school and community health resources.

Examples: health clinic, school wellness committee, school nurse, local health department

[HE] (8) 7 :
8.2.2) Examine ways the school and community encourage students to use appropriate life skills to improve health.

Examples: participating in conflict resolution practices, Red Ribbon Week, Walk to School Day

[HE] (8) 23 :
8.8.2) Work collaboratively to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and schools.

Examples: designing healthy recipes, supporting the school wellness policy, school newscasts, school newsletters

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (5 - 12)
Title: Inclusion in Higher Education: Move to Include
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mti17.goingtocollege/going-to-college/
Description:

There are college options for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. These programs connect students to the community and the larger world. Continued education increases learning and skill-building, social contact and better job opportunities for students. This video can be played during a lesson on locating school and community health resources.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (7) 7 :
7.2.2) Explain how communities can affect personal health practices and behaviors.

Examples: public policies regarding water pollution, air quality, tobacco use

[HE] (8) 23 :
8.8.2) Work collaboratively to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and schools.

Examples: designing healthy recipes, supporting the school wellness policy, school newscasts, school newsletters

[HE] HED (9-12) 1 :
HE.1.1) Predict how health literacy and behaviors can affect health status.

[HE] HED (9-12) 30 :
HE.8.1) Utilize accurate peer and societal norms to formulate a health enhancing message.

Example: using data on local health issues to develop a positive message concerning a topic

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (7 - 12)
Title: How Lead Went from Household Staple to Dangerous Toxin
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/9233db95-5f7d-4621-a319-e5bf4b442136/how-lead-went-from-household-staple-to-dangerous-toxin/
Description:

Learn why lead exposure is still a concern throughout the country with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 12, 2016.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

[HE] WH (10-12) 1 :
WH.1.1) Research the history of disease in the world.

a. Identify causes of major outbreaks and epidemics in the history of the world.

b. List major breakthroughs in the prevention and cure of disease.

c. Assess the effects of current health issues on world populations.

[HE] WH (10-12) 2 :
WH.2.1) Examine the health challenges facing the world today.

a. Collect statistical data about health issues within various countries.

b. Investigate the influence of family, peers, and culture on possible solutions to world health issues.

c. Examine the links among health, economic development, media, and technology.

d. Research how disparities in socio-economic status can adversely affect health and access to health care globally.

e. Analyze the roles and responsibilities of government and non-governmental organizations in achieving global health.

[HE] WH (10-12) 7 :
WH.5.2) Examine barriers that hinder decision-making skills related to world health issues.

Examples: politics, religious beliefs, culture

Subject: Health Education (9 - 12)
Title: Coal's Deadly Dust - A Resurgence in Black Lung Disease
URL: https://thinktv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fln37cdd-soc-blacklung/a-resurgence-in-black-lung-disease-coals-deadly-dust/
Description:

Learn how the recent resurgence of progressive massive fibrosis, the most severe form of “black lung” disease, in miners across Appalachia has been linked to the failure of coal-mine regulations to limit silica dust levels in these excerpts from Coal’s Deadly Dust | FRONTLINE, in partnership with NPR.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [HE] (8) 23 :
8.8.2) Work collaboratively to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and schools.

Examples: designing healthy recipes, supporting the school wellness policy, school newscasts, school newsletters

[HE] HED (9-12) 32 :
HE.8.3) Work cooperatively as an advocate for improving personal and community health.

Examples: student-led events, community fundraisers, national events, signing a pledge to abstain from alcohol

Subject: Health Education (8 - 12)
Title: Discover Inclusive Wellness
URL: https://www.nchpad.org/fppics/NCHPAD_Discover%20Inclusive%20School%20Wellness(1).pdf
Description:

Discover Inclusive Wellness is an addendum to CDC's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. This guide will help teachers and students learn how to effectively include children with disabilities in their advocacy and school wellness efforts. As students are learning in middle school to work collaboratively to advocate for healthy individuals, families, and schools, this guide would assist teachers with educating their students on how to effectively include students with disabilities in their school wellness plans and how they can advocate for full inclusion. 

This alignment results from the ALEX Health/PE COS Resource Alignment Summit.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 13

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