ALEX Classroom Resources

ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 32 :
32 ) Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function. [F-IF8]

a. Use the process of factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to show zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of the graph, and interpret these in terms of a context. [F-IF8a]

b. Use the properties of exponents to interpret expressions for exponential functions. [F-IF8b]

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, and y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth and decay.

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Rewriting Quadratic Expressions in Factored Form (Part 1): Algebra 1, Episode 15: Unit 7, Lesson 6 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep15-76/rewriting-quadratic-expressions-in-factored-form-part-1/
Description:

In this video lesson, students begin to rewrite quadratic expressions from standard to factored form.

Students relate the numbers in the factored form to the coefficients of the terms in standard form, looking for a structure that can be used to go in reverse—from standard form to factored form (MP7).

(This lesson only looks at expressions of the form (x + m)(x + n) and (x – m)(x – n) where m and n are positive.)



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 32 :
32 ) Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function. [F-IF8]

a. Use the process of factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to show zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of the graph, and interpret these in terms of a context. [F-IF8a]

b. Use the properties of exponents to interpret expressions for exponential functions. [F-IF8b]

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, and y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth and decay.

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Rewriting Quadratic Expressions in Factored Form (Part 2): Algebra 1, Episode 16: Unit 7, Lesson 7 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep16-77/rewriting-quadratic-expressions-in-factored-form-part-2/
Description:

Earlier in this video series, students transformed quadratic expressions from standard form into factored form. There, the factored expressions are products of two sums, (x + m)(x + n), or two differences, (x – m)(x – n). Students continue that work in this video lesson, extending it to include expressions that can be rewritten as products of a sum and a difference, (x + m)(x – n).

Through repeated reasoning, students notice that when we apply the distributive property to multiply out a sum and a difference, the product has a negative constant term, but the linear term can be negative or positive (MP8). Students make use of the structure as they take this insight to transform quadratic expressions into factored form (MP7).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 32 :
32 ) Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function. [F-IF8]

a. Use the process of factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to show zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of the graph, and interpret these in terms of a context. [F-IF8a]

b. Use the properties of exponents to interpret expressions for exponential functions. [F-IF8b]

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, and y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth and decay.

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Rewriting Quadratic Expressions in Factored Form (Part 3): Algebra 1, Episode 17: Unit 7, Lesson 8 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep17-78/rewriting-quadratic-expressions-in-factored-form-part-3/
Description:

In this video lesson, students encounter quadratic expressions without a linear term and consider how to write them in factored form.

Through repeated reasoning, students are able to generalize the equivalence of these two forms: (x + m)(x – m) and x2 – m2 (MP8). Then, they make use of the structure relating the two expressions to rewrite expressions (MP7) from one form to the other.

Students also consider why a difference of two squares (such as x2 – 25) can be written in factored form, but a sum of two squares (such as x2 + 25) cannot be, even though both are quadratic expressions with no linear term.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: What Are Perfect Squares?: Algebra 1, Episode 19: Unit 7, Lesson 11 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep19-711/what-are-perfect-squares/
Description:

This video lesson has two key aims. The first aim is to familiarize students with the structure of perfect-square expressions. Students analyze various examples of perfect squares. They apply the distributive property repeatedly to expand perfect-square expressions given in the factored form (MP8). The repeated reasoning allows them to generalize expressions of the form (x + n)2 as equivalent to x2 + 2nx + n2.

The second aim is to help students see that perfect squares can be handy for solving equations because we can find their square roots. Recognizing the structure of a perfect square equips students to look for features that are necessary to complete a square (MP7), which they will do in a future video lesson.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Standard Form and Factored Form: Algebra 1, Episode 8: Unit 6, Lesson 9 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep8-69/standard-form-and-factored-form/
Description:

Previously in this video series, students used area diagrams to expand expressions of the form (x + p)(x + q) and generalized that the expanded expressions take the form of x2 + (p + q)x + pq. In this video lesson, they see that the same generalization can be applied when the factored expression contains a sum and a difference (when p or q is negative) or two differences (when both p and q are negative).

Students transition from thinking about rectangular diagrams concretely, in terms of area, to thinking about them more abstractly, as a way to organize the terms in each factor. They also learn to use the terms standard form and factored form. When classifying quadratic expressions by their form, students refine their language and thinking about quadratic expressions (MP6).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 16 :
16 ) Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method. [A-REI1]

[MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 17 :
17 ) Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters. [A-REI3]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 20 :
20 ) Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions. [A-CED1]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 24 :
24 ) Solve simple rational and radical equations in one variable, and give examples showing how extraneous solutions may arise. [A-REI2]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 29 :
29 ) Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes.* [F-IF5]

Example: If the function h(n) gives the number of person-hours it takes to assemble n engines in a factory, then the positive integers would be an appropriate domain for the function.

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 20 :
20 ) Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions. [A-CED1]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 24 :
24 ) Solve simple rational and radical equations in one variable, and give examples showing how extraneous solutions may arise. [A-REI2]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 29 :
29 ) Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes.* [F-IF5]

Example: If the function h(n) gives the number of person-hours it takes to assemble n engines in a factory, then the positive integers would be an appropriate domain for the function.

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 11 :
11. Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems in context, either exactly or approximately. Extend from contexts arising from linear functions to those involving quadratic, exponential, and absolute value functions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 15 :
15. Define a function as a mapping from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) that assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range.

a. Use function notation, evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context. Note: If f is a function and x is an element of its domain, then f(x) denotes the output of f corresponding to the input x.

b. Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes. Limit to linear, quadratic, exponential, and absolute value functions.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Applying the Quadratic Formula (Part 1): Algebra 1, Episode 24: Unit 7, Lesson 17 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep24-717/applying-the-quadratic-formula-part-1/
Description:

In this video lesson, students return to some quadratic functions they have seen. They write quadratic equations to represent relationships and use the quadratic formula to solve problems that they did not previously have the tools to solve (other than by graphing). In some cases, the quadratic formula is the only practical way to find the solutions. In others, students can decide to use other methods that might be more straightforward (MP5).

The work in this lesson—writing equations, solving them, and interpreting the solutions in context—encourages students to reason quantitatively and abstractly (MP2).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 32 :
32 ) Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function. [F-IF8]

a. Use the process of factoring and completing the square in a quadratic function to show zeros, extreme values, and symmetry of the graph, and interpret these in terms of a context. [F-IF8a]

b. Use the properties of exponents to interpret expressions for exponential functions. [F-IF8b]

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, and y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth and decay.

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2019] REG-8 (8) 3 :
3. Develop and apply properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical and algebraic expressions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 24 :
24. Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and those that can be modeled with exponential functions.

a. Show that linear functions grow by equal differences over equal intervals, while exponential functions grow by equal factors over equal intervals.

b. Define linear functions to represent situations in which one quantity changes at a constant rate per unit interval relative to another.

c. Define exponential functions to represent situations in which a quantity grows or decays by a constant percent rate per unit interval relative to another.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 25 :
25. Construct linear and exponential functions, including arithmetic and geometric sequences, given a graph, a description of a relationship, or two input-output pairs (include reading these from a table).
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (8 - 12)
Title: Equivalent Expressions Using Exponents
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mgbh-math-ee-8exp/equivalent-expressions-using-exponents/
Description:

Students will apply their critical thinking skills to learn about multiplication and division of exponents. This interactive exercise focuses on positive and negative exponents and combining exponents in an effort to help students recognize patterns and determine a rule.

This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School collection.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 16 :
16 ) Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method. [A-REI1]

[MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 17 :
17 ) Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters. [A-REI3]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 21 :
21 ) Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales. [A-CED2]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 27 :
27 ) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 21 :
21 ) Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales. [A-CED2]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 27 :
27 ) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 10 :
10. Select an appropriate method to solve a system of two linear equations in two variables.

a. Solve a system of two equations in two variables by using linear combinations; contrast situations in which use of linear combinations is more efficient with those in which substitution is more efficient.

b. Contrast solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables produced by algebraic methods with graphical and tabular methods.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 12 :
12. Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities in context; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales and use them to make predictions. Limit to contexts arising from linear, quadratic, exponential, absolute value, and linear piecewise functions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 14 :
14. Given a relation defined by an equation in two variables, identify the graph of the relation as the set of all its solutions plotted in the coordinate plane.
Note: The graph of a relation often forms a curve (which could be a line).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 15 :
15. Define a function as a mapping from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) that assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range.

a. Use function notation, evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context. Note: If f is a function and x is an element of its domain, then f(x) denotes the output of f corresponding to the input x.

b. Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes. Limit to linear, quadratic, exponential, and absolute value functions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 19 :
19. Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x).

a. Find the approximate solutions of an equation graphically, using tables of values, or finding successive approximations, using technology where appropriate.
Note: Include cases where f(x) is a linear, quadratic, exponential, or absolute value function and g(x) is constant or linear.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 20 :
20. Graph the solutions to a linear inequality in two variables as a half-plane (excluding the boundary in the case of a strict inequality), and graph the solution set to a system of linear inequalities in two variables as the intersection of the corresponding half-planes, using technology where appropriate.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: How Many Solutions?: Algebra 1, Episode 14: Unit 7, Lesson 5 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep14-75/how-many-solutions/
Description:

This video lesson builds on the idea that both graphing and rewriting quadratic equations in the form of expression = 0 are useful strategies for solving equations. It also reinforces the ties between the zeros of a function and the horizontal intercepts of its graph, which students began exploring in an earlier unit.

Here, students learn that they can solve equations by rearranging them into the form expression = 0, graphing the equation y = expression, and finding the horizontal intercepts. They also notice that dividing each side of a quadratic equation by a variable is not reliable because it eliminates one of the solutions. As students explain why certain maneuvers for solving quadratic equations are acceptable and others are not, students practice constructing logical arguments (MP3).

 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 4 :
4. Interpret linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions in terms of a context by viewing one or more of their parts as a single entity.

Example: Interpret the accrued amount of investment P(1 + r)t , where P is the principal and r is the interest rate, as the product of P and a factor depending on time t.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Completing the Square (Part 1): Algebra 1, Episode 20: Unit 7, Lesson 12 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep20-712/completing-the-square-part-1/
Description:

Previously in this video series, students saw that a squared expression of the form (x + n)2 is equivalent to x2 + 2nx + n2. This means that, when written in standard form ax2 + bx + c (where a is 1), b is equal to 2n and c is equal to n2. Here, students begin to reason the other way around. They recognize that if ax2 + bx + c is a perfect square, then the value being squared to get c is half of b, or (b/2)2. Students use this insight to build perfect squares, which they then use to solve quadratic equations.

Students learn that if we rearrange and rewrite the expression on one side of a quadratic equation to be a perfect square, that is if we complete the square, we can find the solutions of the equation.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 4 :
4. Interpret linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions in terms of a context by viewing one or more of their parts as a single entity.

Example: Interpret the accrued amount of investment P(1 + r)t , where P is the principal and r is the interest rate, as the product of P and a factor depending on time t.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 6 :
6. Choose and produce an equivalent form of an expression to reveal and explain properties of the quantity represented by the expression.

a. Factor quadratic expressions with leading coefficients of one, and use the factored form to reveal the zeros of the function it defines.

b. Use the vertex form of a quadratic expression to reveal the maximum or minimum value and the axis of symmetry of the function it defines; complete the square to find the vertex form of quadratics with a leading coefficient of one.

c. Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions.

Example: Identify percent rate of change in functions such as y = (1.02)t, y = (0.97)t, y = (1.01)12t, y = (1.2)t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Algebra I Module 4, Topic A: Quadratic Expressions, Equations, Functions, and Their Connection to Rectangles
URL: https://www.engageny.org/resource/algebra-i-module-4-topic-overview
Description:

Module 4, Topic A introduces polynomial expressions. In Module 1, students learned the definition of a polynomial and how to add, subtract, and multiply polynomials. Here, their work with multiplication is extended and connected to factoring polynomial expressions and solving basic polynomial equations (A-APR.A.1, A-REI.D.11). They analyze, interpret, and use the structure of polynomial expressions to multiply and factor polynomial expressions (A-SSE.A.2). They understand factoring as the reverse process of multiplication. In this topic, students develop the factoring skills needed to solve quadratic equations and simple polynomial equations by using the zero-product property (A-SSE.B.3a). Students transform quadratic expressions from standard form, ax2 + bx + c, to factored form, f(x) = a(x - n)(x - m), and then solve equations involving those expressions. They identify the solutions of the equation as the zeros of the related function. Students apply symmetry to create and interpret graphs of quadratic functions (F-IF.B.4, F-IF.C.7a). They use the average rate of change on an interval to determine where the function is increasing or decreasing (F-IF.B.6). Using area models, students explore strategies for factoring more complicated quadratic expressions, including the product-sum method and rectangular arrays. They create one- and two-variable equations from tables, graphs, and contexts and use them to solve contextual problems represented by the quadratic function (A-CED.A.1, A-CED.A.2). Students then relate the domain and range for the function to its graph and the context (F-IF.B.5).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational. [N-RN3]

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 4 :
4. Interpret linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions in terms of a context by viewing one or more of their parts as a single entity.

Example: Interpret the accrued amount of investment P(1 + r)t , where P is the principal and r is the interest rate, as the product of P and a factor depending on time t.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Algebra I Module 4, Topic B: Using Different Forms for Quadratic Functions
URL: https://www.engageny.org/resource/algebra-i-module-4-topic-b-overview
Description:

Students apply their experiences from Module 4, Topic A as they transform quadratic functions from standard form to vertex form, (x) = a(x - h)2 + k in Topic B. The strategy known as completing the square is used to solve quadratic equations when the quadratic expression cannot be factored (A-SSE.B.3b). Students recognize that this form reveals specific features of quadratic functions and their graphs, namely the minimum or maximum of the function (i.e., the vertex of the graph) and the line of symmetry of the graph (A-APR.B.3, F-IF.B.4, F-IF.C.7a).  Students derive the quadratic formula by completing the square for a general quadratic equation in standard form, y = ax2 + bx + c, and use it to determine the nature and number of solutions for equations when y equals zero (A-SSE.A.2, A-REI.B.4). For quadratics with irrational roots, students use the quadratic formula and explore the properties of irrational numbers (N-RN.B.3). With the added technique of completing the square in their toolboxes, students come to see the structure of the equations in their various forms as useful for gaining insight into the features of the graphs of equations (A-SSE.B.3). Students study business applications of quadratic functions as they create quadratic equations and graphs from tables and contexts, and then use them to solve problems involving profit, loss, revenue, cost, etc. (A-CED.A.1, A-CED.A.2, F-IF.B.6, F-IF.C.8a). In addition to applications in business, students solve physics-based problems involving objects in motion.  In doing so, students also interpret expressions and parts of expressions in context and recognize when a single entity of an expression is dependent or independent of a given quantity (A-SSE.A.1).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 4 :
4. Interpret linear, quadratic, and exponential expressions in terms of a context by viewing one or more of their parts as a single entity.

Example: Interpret the accrued amount of investment P(1 + r)t , where P is the principal and r is the interest rate, as the product of P and a factor depending on time t.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Algebra I Module 1, Topic B: The Structure of Expressions
URL: https://www.engageny.org/resource/algebra-i-module-1-topic-b-overview
Description:

In middle school, students applied the properties of operations to add, subtract, factor, and expand expressions (6.EE.3, 6.EE.4, 7.EE.1, 8.EE.1). Now, in Module 1, Topic B, students use the structure of expressions to define what it means for two algebraic expressions to be equivalent. In doing so, they discern that the commutative, associative, and distributive properties help link each of the expressions in the collection together, even if the expressions look very different themselves (A-SSE.2). They learn the definition of a polynomial expression and build fluency in identifying and generating polynomial expressions as well as adding, subtracting, and multiplying polynomial expressions (A-APR.1). The Mid-Module Assessment follows Topic B.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 12

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