Create Your Own Google Logo

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Create Your Own Google Logo

URL:

https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/create-your-own-google-logo/overview.html

Content Source:

Other
Google CS First
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In each of the “Create your own Google logo” activities, students code and design their own versions of the Google logo. These activities introduce students to computer science and the programming language Scratch. These activities are most appropriate for students ages 9-14 and take 15-60 minutes to run.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more. 

Users will need a Google account to use this resource. 

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Tags: animation, debug, effects, problem solving, programming, scratch, sprite
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies/terms/
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

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Author: Aimee Bates