When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media?

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

When Is Your Brain Ready for Social Media?

URL:

https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/brain-ready-for-social-media-above-the-noise/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Social media is a mixed bag. Being online may increase chances of identity theft and cyberbullying, yet, it’s estimated over 20% of 8 to 12 year-olds have at least one social media account—sometimes without their parents’ knowledge. At times, tweens are taking back charge of their brand, started by their parents since they were born, and sometimes, they are looking to share and connect with a community they have trouble finding face-to-face. So, What’s the right age to start using social media? This resource includes a video and student handout with discussion questions.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
11) Demonstrate positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content and identify the consequences of failing to act responsibly.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
11) Advocate for positive, safe, legal, and ethical habits when creating and sharing digital content.

Example: Students create a brochure that highlights the consequences of illegally downloading media.

Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Tags: cyerbullying, privacy, safety, social media
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.pbslearningmedia.org/help/terms-of-use/#.XlvjwY7YrnE
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver