Who Won the American Revolution/Crash Course US History #7

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Who Won the American Revolution/Crash Course US History #7

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/83da867c-6425-4f09-9241-c183b30f9625/who-won-the-american-revolution-crash-course-us-history-7/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the American Revolution. John will teach you about the major battles of the war and discuss the strategies on both sides. Everyone is familiar with how this war played out for the Founding Fathers; they got to become the Founding Fathers. But what did the revolution mean to the common people in the United States? For white, property-owning males, it was pretty sweet. They gained rights that were a definite step up from being British Colonial citizens. For everyone else, the short-term gains were not clear. Women's rights were unaffected, and slaves remained in slavery. As for poor white folks, they remained poor and disenfranchised. The reality is it took a long time for this whole democracy thing to get underway, and the principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness weren't immediately available to all these newly minted Americans.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
3 ) Trace the chronology of events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Explaining the role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington; John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; Patrick Henry; Samuel Adams; Paul Revere; Crispus Attucks; and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
•  Explaining the significance of revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Summarizing major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, including the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau
•  Comparing perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution, including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians
•  Describing how provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 affected relations of the United States with European nations and American Indians

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.3- Recognize the importance of major events leading up to the American Revolution including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
SS.AAS.10.3a - List the major provisions of the Treaty of Paris 1783.
SS.AAS.10.3b - Compare the First and Second Continental Congresses.


Tags: American Revolution, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, Trenton, Yorktown
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
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Author: Ginger Boyd