19th Century Reforms/Crash Course US History #15

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

19th Century Reforms/Crash Course US History #15

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/1f7c35d3-d295-4f96-9b91-c29d54815bc1/19th-century-reforms-crash-course-us-history-15/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about various reform movements in the 19th century United States. From Utopian societies to the Second Great Awakening to the Abolition movement, American society was undergoing great changes in the first half of the 19th century. Attempts at idealized societies popped up (and universally failed) at Utopia, OH, New Harmony, IN, Modern Times, NY, and many other places around the country. These utopians had a problem with mainstream society, and their answer was to withdraw into their own little worlds. Others didn't like the society they saw and decided to try to change it. Relatively new protestant denominations like the Methodists and Baptists reached out to "the unchurched" during the Second Great Awakening, and membership in evangelical sects of Christianity rose quickly. At the same time, Abolitionist societies were trying to free the slaves. Americans of the 19th century had looked at the world they were living in and decided to change it.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.12- Define abolition; understand the purpose of the abolitionist movement; identify important leaders and contributions of the abolitionist movement.


Tags: Harriet Tubman, Uncle Toms Cabin, underground railroad
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityVideo resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

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**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd