Why Government

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Why Government

URL:

https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/why-government?referer=node/10467&page_title=Foundations%20of%20Government

Content Source:

Other
iCivics
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson from iCivics, students take a look at two political thinkers that spent a lot of time trying to answer the question, "Why Government?" - Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. This lesson combines our Influence Library entries on these men and adds activities that ask students to compare and contrast Hobbes and Locke and to think about how these philosophers influenced those that followed in their footsteps. 

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
2 ) Explain essential characteristics of the political system of the United States, including the organization and function of political parties and the process of selecting political leaders.

•  Describing the influence of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Paine, Niccolò Machiavelli, Charles de Montesquieu, and François-Marie Arouet (Voltaire) on the political system of the United States

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.2- Define political parties; identify that political leaders are elected in the United States and that political parties work to get their candidates elected.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
3 ) Compare the government of the United States with other governmental systems, including monarchy, limited monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, theocracy, and pure democracy.


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.3- Describe the basic ideals of American democracy, including natural rights, basic freedoms, and democratic representation; identify characteristics of other government systems including, monarchy, dictatorship, and democracy.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
6 ) Explain the importance of juvenile, adult, civil, and criminal laws within the judicial system of the United States.

•  Explaining rights of citizens as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights under the Constitution of the United States
•  Explaining what is meant by the term rule of law
•  Justifying consequences of committing a civil or criminal offense
•  Contrasting juvenile and adult laws at local, state, and federal levels (Alabama)

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.6- Identify the basic rights under the Bill of Rights; recognize how government protects individual rights; recognize that citizens have a responsibility to follow laws and that there are consequences for breaking laws.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
5 ) Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations.

•  Contrasting philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings
•  Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great
•  Identifying major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.5- Define natural right; identify common characteristics of a monarchy and of a constitutional government.
SS.AAS.9.5a - Identify the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights by giving examples of civil liberties and limited government.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
6 ) Identify significant ideas and achievements of scientists and philosophers of the Scientific Revolution and the Age of Enlightenment.

Examples: Scientific Revolution—astronomical theories of Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei, Sir Isaac Newton's law of gravity

Age of Enlightenment—philosophies of Charles de Montesquieu, François-Marie Arouet (Voltaire), and Jean-Jacques Rousseau


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.6- Recognize important factors of the Scientific Revolution and the Age of Enlightenment; identify the scientific advancements that led to the Enlightenment.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
4 ) Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Interpreting the Preamble to the Constitution of the United States; separation of powers; federal system; elastic clause; the Bill of Rights; and the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Nineteenth Amendments as key elements of the Constitution of the United States
•  Describing inadequacies of the Articles of Confederation
•  Distinguishing personalities, issues, ideologies, and compromises related to the Constitutional Convention and the ratification of the Constitution of the United States, including the role of the Federalist papers
•  Identifying factors leading to the development and establishment of political parties, including Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, conflicting views of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, George Washington's Farewell Address, and the election of 1800

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.4- Understand that the U.S. Constitution is our plan of government.
SS.AAS.10.4a - Define the amendments including the Bill of Rights.
SS.AAS.10.4b - Define the major provisions of the Constitution including the separation of powers, checks and balances, the three branches of government - executive, legislative, and judicial.
SS.AAS.10.4c - Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.


Tags: Age of Enlightenment, John Locke, rule of law, Thomas Hobbs
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Author: Ginger Boyd