Lesson One: Introduction to Jewish Life During the Holocaust

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Lesson One: Introduction to Jewish Life During the Holocaust

URL:

https://education.mjhnyc.org/lessons/lesson-plan-one-introduction-to-jewish-life-during-the-holocaust/

Content Source:

Other
Museum of Jewish Heritage
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

This lesson provides an introduction to the study of the Holocaust and can be used as the first lesson of a larger unit, or a stand-alone lesson to discuss essential content and themes. The Holocaust refers to the systematic murder of six million Jews, and millions of others, by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during World War II. The Nazi Party came to power in 1933. Its leader, Adolf Hitler, was appointed chancellor of Germany and began to target Jews. Roma/Sinti, those with physical or mental disabilities, LGBTQ people, political dissidents, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and others were considered enemies by the Nazis and not worthy of human rights.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 6
United States Studies: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.6.6- Identify the broad causes and participants of World War II; locate major World War II countries on a map and label Axis and Allied countries; identify at least one major individual involved in World War II including FDR, Adolf Hitler, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin; identify at least one major event of World War II, including the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Holocaust, and the bombing Hiroshima.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9
World History: 1500 to the Present
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.9.14- Define global conflict and describe how World War II was a global conflict; recognize social, economic, and/or political changes, key events, and people from World War II including the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and the Nuremberg Trials.
SS.AAS.9.14a- Identify turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters.
SS.AAS.9.14b- Identify the map changes in national borders as a result of World War II.
SS.AAS.9.14c- Identify the Axis and Allied Powers.
SS.AAS.9.14d- Iden


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.9 - Define blitzkrieg, genocide, island - hopping, and concentration camps; locate key locations involved in World War II that led to global conflict; identify key events, people, and/or strategies involved in World War II.


Tags: Holocaust, World War II
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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Author: Ginger Boyd