The Crash of 1929 - Photo Gallery: The Roaring 20s

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Crash of 1929 - Photo Gallery: The Roaring 20s

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct14.soc.amexcraroa/the-crash-of-1929-photo-gallery-the-roaring-20s/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Many Americans spent the 1920s in a great mood. Investors flocked to a rising stock market. Companies launched brand-new, cutting-edge products, like radios and washing machines. Exuberant Americans kicked up their heels to jazz music, tried crazy stunts, and supported a black market in liquor after Prohibition. A popular expression of the time asked, "What will they think of next?" See the blue-skies optimism of the Roaring Twenties with this gallery from American Experience: "The Crash of 1929."

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
2 ) Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
•  Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement

•  Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
•  Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
•  Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
•  Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.2- Identify the goals of the Progressive movement; identify people and/or describe major events and developments in the United States during the Progressive movement.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
5 ) Evaluate the impact of social changes and the influence of key figures in the United States from World War I through the 1920s, including Prohibition, the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the Scopes Trial, limits on immigration, Ku Klux Klan activities, the Red Scare, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, W. C. Handy, and Zelda Fitzgerald. (Alabama) [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing radio, cinema, and print media for their impact on the creation of mass culture
•  Analyzing works of major American artists and writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, and H. L. Mencken, to characterize the era of the 1920s
•  Determining the relationship between technological innovations and the creation of increased leisure time

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.5- Identify key social changes that occurred after World War I.
SS.AAS.11.5a - Identify notable people of the 1920s including Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andrew Wyeth, Frederick Remington, Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, Henry Ford, W.C. Handy, Zora Neale Hurston, and Al Capone.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.11.6- Define economic depression; recognize the general causes of the Great Depression including overproduction of crops, stock market crash; recognize the effects of the Great Depression including collapse of the farm economy, unemployment, bank failure, homelessness and soup kitchens.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement
6 ) Compare information presented through various media, including television, newspapers, magazines, journals, and the Internet.

•  Explaining the reliability of news stories and their sources
•  Describing the use, misuse, and meaning of different media materials, including photographs, artwork, and film clips
•  Critiquing viewpoints presented in editorial writing and political cartoons, including the use of symbols that represent viewpoints
•  Describing the role of intentional and unintentional bias and flawed samplings
Tags: jazz, prohibition, Roaring Twenties, stock market crash of 1929
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Author: Ginger Boyd