ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 3: Drawing in Game Lab (18-19)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 3: Drawing in Game Lab (18-19)

URL:

https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/3/puzzle/1

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

The class is introduced to the Game Lab, the programming environment for this unit, and begins to use it to position shapes on the screen. The lesson covers the basics of sequencing and debugging, as well as a few simple commands. At the end of the lesson, the class creates an online version of the image they designed in the previous lesson.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • list a set of steps taken to complete a process and name that process as a function.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • process
  • function
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that often people seek to simplify processes; rather than listing all of the steps needed to take a shower, one simply uses the function "shower".
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • combine or join steps such as algorithms to create a function.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
    it is simpler and less confusing to identify processes rather than steps.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use the problem solving or design thinking process to think logically through a previously solved complex problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to define the problem.
  • how to plan solutions.
  • how to implement a plan.
  • how to reflect on the results and process.
  • how to iterate through the process again.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the steps involved with formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried with or without a computer.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • computational thinking is formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried out with or without a computer.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • summarize a collection of steps or algorithms as one function.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • an algorithm is the set of commands to complete a task.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • combine several algorithms or tasks as a named function.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • it is more efficient to label an activity or program as a function than to list all of the individual steps or algorithms that make up the function or activity.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • break a problem into parts or steps.
  • find patterns or trends.
  • create steps to solve the problem.
  • infer rules or principles associated with problem solving.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • smaller tasks are easier to solve than complex problems.
  • that trends in data can also speed up the problem-solving process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • abstract portions of the problem and focus on smaller tasks to aid in solving a complex problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex problems can be overwhelming.
  • by decomposing the complex problem into simpler problems, a solution is easier to reach.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design a function that demonstrates the removal of repetitive sequence of steps.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • function
  • abstraction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a function can be called into a programming while abstracting out the details contained within the function.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a function that can be called into a programming while leaving out the details contained within the function.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • abstraction is a way of hiding the details of a complex function and being able to quickly make use of the complexity that has been hidden abstraction by calling in the function.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm that includes sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a programming language to create algorithms that make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create programs to make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each programming language has a unique way of making use of sequencing, selections, and iterations in algorithms.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • examine a given artifact used to aid in problem solving.
  • discuss the efficiency of that artifact in problem solving.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that many solutions exist to solve a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • communicate their opinion on the efficiency of problem solving methods.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • while many solutions exist for a problem, some are better suited to meet specific needs, such as efficiency.
Tags: bug, debugging, function, problem solving, program
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://code.org/tos
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates