ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 7: The Draw Loop (18-19)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 7: The Draw Loop (18-19)

URL:

https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/7/puzzle/1

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

This lesson introduces the draw loop, one of the core programming paradigms in the Game Lab. The class combines the draw loop with random numbers to manipulate some simple animations with dots and then with sprites. Afterward, everyone uses what they learned to update the sprite scene from the previous lesson.

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Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • find algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
algorithm sequence selection iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • differences between the three basic programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the differences in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • differences exist in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use the problem solving or design thinking process to think logically through a previously solved complex problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to define the problem.
  • how to plan solutions.
  • how to implement a plan.
  • how to reflect on the results and process.
  • how to iterate through the process again.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the steps involved with formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried with or without a computer.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • computational thinking is formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried out with or without a computer.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a variable set to a specific value within a program that will change during the program but will reinitialize or return back to the specific value initially set when the program is run again.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • initialize
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that updating a variable during a program changes the initial value set, so variables need to be initialized (set to the original value) at the start or end of a task or program.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • set variables back to their original values upon start
  • up or completion of a task or program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • variables need to be initialized for programs to work properly more than once.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • discuss the components of the problem-solving process.
  • apply the components of the problem-solving process.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • problem-solving process
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • when solving problems, one should identify the problem, identify possible solutions, evaluate to select a best solution, implement the solution, evaluate the solution and/or seek feedback.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify a problem.
  • identify possible solutions.
  • evaluate to select a best solution.
  • implement a solution.
  • evaluate a solution.
  • seek feedback.
  • revise an artifact based on feedback.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • problem-solving is a process that can take multiple iterations.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design complex algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to design complex algorithms that make use of all three programming structures sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design complex algorithms using the various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex algorithms contain sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • write a text-based narrative for expected behavior, given code or pseudocode.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • narrative
  • pseudocode
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a narrative is a spoken or written account of events.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the intended process in a given code or pseudocode.
  • convert given code or pseudocode to a narrative of expected behavior.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • every line of code has an intended behavior.
Tags: animation, draw, frame, frame rate, loop, properties
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates