ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 13: Other Forms of Input (18-19)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 13: Other Forms of Input (18-19)

URL:

https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/13/puzzle/1

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

The class continues to explore ways to use conditional statements to take user input. In addition to the simple keyDown() command learned yesterday, the class learns about several other keyboard input commands as well as ways to take mouse input.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
3) Create pseudocode that uses conditionals.

Examples: Using if/then/else (If it is raining then bring an umbrella else get wet).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of steps that contain conditional operations to include if, then, and else.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditionals
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that conditional statements provide options for how a process is completed.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • communicate a process and its available yes/no or true/false options.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • conditionals are limited to options that are either true or false.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a variable set to a specific value within a program that will change during the program but will reinitialize or return back to the specific value initially set when the program is run again.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • initialize
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that updating a variable during a program changes the initial value set, so variables need to be initialized (set to the original value) at the start or end of a task or program.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • set variables back to their original values upon start
  • up or completion of a task or program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • variables need to be initialized for programs to work properly more than once.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of complex steps that contain conditional operators to include if, then, else and Boolean statements such as >, <, =,.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditional
  • Boolean statement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that Boolean logic combined with conditional statements make for complex and powerful programs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use Boolean logic combined with conditional statements to create complex pseudocode or a program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions in conditionals are what makes programs more complex.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a variable whose value changes during their program.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • program
  • value
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to update variables throughout their programs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • write complex programs where variables can be changed while a program is running.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • variables can be changed while a program runs.
  • changes to variables could trigger other events within a program.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm that includes sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a programming language to create algorithms that make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create programs to make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each programming language has a unique way of making use of sequencing, selections, and iterations in algorithms.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a properly functioning program using selection, iteration, abstraction, that initializes and updates at least two variables.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • selection
  • iteration
  • abstraction
  • initialize
  • variables
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to write a program that includes selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updates variables.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • write a program that includes foundational programming concepts
  • selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updating variables.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • they have the ability to create and design programs they may have never considered themselves able to do so.
Tags: coding, conditionals, ifelse, input
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates