ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 2 Lesson 15: Velocity (18-19)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 2 Lesson 15: Velocity (18-19)

URL:

https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/15/puzzle/1

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

After a brief review of how the counter pattern is used to move sprites, the class is introduced to the properties that set velocity and rotation speed directly. As they use these new properties in different ways, they build up the skills they need to create a basic side scroller game.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
3) Create pseudocode that uses conditionals.

Examples: Using if/then/else (If it is raining then bring an umbrella else get wet).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of steps that contain conditional operations to include if, then, and else.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditionals
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that conditional statements provide options for how a process is completed.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • communicate a process and its available yes/no or true/false options.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • conditionals are limited to options that are either true or false.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • find algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
algorithm sequence selection iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • differences between the three basic programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the differences in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • differences exist in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use the problem solving or design thinking process to think logically through a previously solved complex problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to define the problem.
  • how to plan solutions.
  • how to implement a plan.
  • how to reflect on the results and process.
  • how to iterate through the process again.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the steps involved with formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried with or without a computer.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • computational thinking is formulating problems and solutions in a way that can be represented or carried out with or without a computer.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of complex steps that contain conditional operators to include if, then, else and Boolean statements such as >, <, =,.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditional
  • Boolean statement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that Boolean logic combined with conditional statements make for complex and powerful programs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use Boolean logic combined with conditional statements to create complex pseudocode or a program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions in conditionals are what makes programs more complex.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm using one of the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to create algorithms and how many algorithms make use of all three programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and recognize various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each structure sequencing, selections, and iterations have a purpose.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design complex algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to design complex algorithms that make use of all three programming structures sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design complex algorithms using the various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex algorithms contain sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • break a problem into parts or steps.
  • find patterns or trends.
  • create steps to solve the problem.
  • infer rules or principles associated with problem solving.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • smaller tasks are easier to solve than complex problems.
  • that trends in data can also speed up the problem-solving process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • abstract portions of the problem and focus on smaller tasks to aid in solving a complex problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex problems can be overwhelming.
  • by decomposing the complex problem into simpler problems, a solution is easier to reach.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use algorithms to automate a process such as sorting numbers in a random list or playing cards in a deck.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • algorithms can be used to automate a process efficiently.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use search and sort algorithms to automate organizing a set.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • algorithms organized and applied to the appropriate task can significant increase proficiency.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • write a text-based narrative for expected behavior, given code or pseudocode.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • narrative
  • pseudocode
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a narrative is a spoken or written account of events.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the intended process in a given code or pseudocode.
  • convert given code or pseudocode to a narrative of expected behavior.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • every line of code has an intended behavior.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design a function that demonstrates the removal of repetitive sequence of steps.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • function
  • abstraction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a function can be called into a programming while abstracting out the details contained within the function.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a function that can be called into a programming while leaving out the details contained within the function.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • abstraction is a way of hiding the details of a complex function and being able to quickly make use of the complexity that has been hidden abstraction by calling in the function.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm that includes sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a programming language to create algorithms that make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create programs to make use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each programming language has a unique way of making use of sequencing, selections, and iterations in algorithms.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
4) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: 38 = 3*3*3*3*3*3*3*3; =(Average) used in a spreadsheet to average a given list of grades.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a function that simplifies a task.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • function
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a function can be used to simplify a task.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and use functions to simplify tasks.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • functions are useful tools used abundantly in algorithms.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • examine a given artifact used to aid in problem solving.
  • discuss the efficiency of that artifact in problem solving.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that many solutions exist to solve a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • communicate their opinion on the efficiency of problem solving methods.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • while many solutions exist for a problem, some are better suited to meet specific needs, such as efficiency.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain how algorithms and automation have and can increase efficiency.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithmic process
  • automation
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how algorithmic processes and automation have increased efficiency.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • automation is a useful tool for increasing efficiency.
  • while many things can and have been automated, not everything can be automated using algorithmic processes.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a properly functioning program using selection, iteration, abstraction, that initializes and updates at least two variables.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • selection
  • iteration
  • abstraction
  • initialize
  • variables
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to write a program that includes selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updates variables.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • write a program that includes foundational programming concepts
  • selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updating variables.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • they have the ability to create and design programs they may have never considered themselves able to do so.
Tags: animate, controls, jumping, looping, position, rotate, speed, sprite, velocity
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://code.org/tos
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates