ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Jefferson Desk and the Declaration of Independence

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Jefferson Desk and the Declaration of Independence

URL:

http://objectofhistory.org/objects/intro/desk/

Content Source:

Smithsonian
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson plan, students examine Thomas Jefferson's desk to gather information about the writing of the Declaration of Independence. After reviewing additional resources, students create a virtual exhibit.

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
3 ) Trace the chronology of events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Explaining the role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington; John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; Patrick Henry; Samuel Adams; Paul Revere; Crispus Attucks; and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
•  Explaining the significance of revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Summarizing major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, including the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau
•  Comparing perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution, including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians
•  Describing how provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 affected relations of the United States with European nations and American Indians
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the significance of events, leaders, important battles, major political and social theories and philosophies, perspectives of different groups in society, and the impact of political documents on the causes of the American Revolution, the course of the war, and the relationships of the United States with Europe and Native Americans after the war.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • chronology
  • significance
  • theory
  • perspectives
  • provisions
Knowledge:
Students know:
    Details of important events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battle of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
  • The role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Crispus Attucks, Gilbert du Motier, and Marquis de Lafayette.
  • The importance of key revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
  • Influence of the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau on the major ideas in the Declaration of the Declaration of Independence.
  • Perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians.
  • Provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Trace the chronology of events leading up to the American Revolution by following the course, movement, and development of the event.
  • Analyze and explain the role of key revolutionary leaders by interpreting the significance of these individuals.
  • Trace the geographic locations of important Revolutionary battles and explain the significance of each. Summarize the major ideas of the Declaration of Independence .
  • Analyze the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau and relate these to the major ideas within the Declaration of Independence.
  • Compare the perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution by showing the similarities and differences in these groups.
  • Analyze the impact of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the United States' relationship with European nations and American Indians.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were significant events, leaders, important battles, major political and social theories and philosophies, perspectives of different groups in society, and political documents that had an impact on the causes of the American Revolution, the course of the war, and the relationships of the United States with Europe and Native Americans after the war.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.3- Recognize the importance of major events leading up to the American Revolution including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
SS.AAS.10.3a - List the major provisions of the Treaty of Paris 1783.
SS.AAS.10.3b - Compare the First and Second Continental Congresses.


Tags: Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd