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Computer Science Discoveries Unit 6 Chapter 2 Lesson 16: Prototype an Innovation (18-19)

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Title:

Computer Science Discoveries Unit 6 Chapter 2 Lesson 16: Prototype an Innovation (18-19)

URL:

https://studio.code.org/s/csd6-2018/stage/16/puzzle/1?section_id=1888730

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Students, working with a partner or team will brainstorm physical devices they wish to prototype. Students have the option to design a new creation or recreate a device they have found in the "real world". Students will complete a planning guide to determine the resources (physical and digital) they will need to create their prototype. Students will design a user interface (typically an app or circuit board) that may control some output device (like a circuit board). It will be necessary for students to develop pseudocode or algorithms to aid in the coding process. Students will need to complete the problem-solving process during this lesson plan which will include testing a revising the prototype.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce a multimedia artifact.
  • review artifacts created by others.
  • revise an artifact based on peer or teacher feedback.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • feedback is important in a design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a multimedia artifact.
  • critique the work of others.
  • revise their work based on feedback received.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • much like the writing process, design of a multimedia artifact nets the best results when creators have the opportunity to be given feedback and revise as needed.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
3) Create pseudocode that uses conditionals.

Examples: Using if/then/else (If it is raining then bring an umbrella else get wet).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of steps that contain conditional operations to include if, then, and else.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditionals
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that conditional statements provide options for how a process is completed.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • communicate a process and its available yes/no or true/false options.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • conditionals are limited to options that are either true or false.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a variable set to a specific value within a program that will change during the program but will reinitialize or return back to the specific value initially set when the program is run again.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • initialize
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that updating a variable during a program changes the initial value set, so variables need to be initialized (set to the original value) at the start or end of a task or program.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • set variables back to their original values upon start
  • up or completion of a task or program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • variables need to be initialized for programs to work properly more than once.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
23) Discuss how digital devices may be used to collect, analyze, and present information.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • discuss various methods for using digital devices to collect, analyze, and present information.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that information can be presented in many ways.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify ways to collect, analyze, and present information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • devices can be used to collect, analyze, and present information.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • discuss the components of the problem-solving process.
  • apply the components of the problem-solving process.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • problem-solving process
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • when solving problems, one should identify the problem, identify possible solutions, evaluate to select a best solution, implement the solution, evaluate the solution and/or seek feedback.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify a problem.
  • identify possible solutions.
  • evaluate to select a best solution.
  • implement a solution.
  • evaluate a solution.
  • seek feedback.
  • revise an artifact based on feedback.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • problem-solving is a process that can take multiple iterations.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce a multimedia artifact.
  • review artifacts created by others.
  • revise an artifact based on peer or teacher feedback.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • feedback is important in a design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a multimedia artifact.
  • critique the work of others.
  • revise their work based on feedback received.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • much like the writing process, design of a multimedia artifact nets the best results when creators have the opportunity to be given feedback and revise as needed.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compile a set of complex steps that contain conditional operators to include if, then, else and Boolean statements such as >, <, =,.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • conditional
  • Boolean statement
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that Boolean logic combined with conditional statements make for complex and powerful programs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use Boolean logic combined with conditional statements to create complex pseudocode or a program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • questions in conditionals are what makes programs more complex.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm using one of the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to create algorithms and how many algorithms make use of all three programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and recognize various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each structure sequencing, selections, and iterations have a purpose.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design complex algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to design complex algorithms that make use of all three programming structures sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design complex algorithms using the various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex algorithms contain sequencing, selections, and iterations.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • break a problem into parts or steps.
  • find patterns or trends.
  • create steps to solve the problem.
  • infer rules or principles associated with problem solving.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computational thinking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • smaller tasks are easier to solve than complex problems.
  • that trends in data can also speed up the problem-solving process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • abstract portions of the problem and focus on smaller tasks to aid in solving a complex problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex problems can be overwhelming.
  • by decomposing the complex problem into simpler problems, a solution is easier to reach.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to select and design an appropriate medium to display designed content.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • select the best medium for the content design.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • while many mediums exist, it is best to select the one most appropriate to your intended audience.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
27) Identify data needed to create a model or simulation of a given event.

Examples: When creating a random name generator, the program needs access to a list of possible names.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • select a process or system and then determine the data needed to create a model or simulation of the process or system.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • an event is comprised of a set of steps or processes that can be identified and then simulated.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • abstract the sequence of activities that make up an event.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • dissecting the parts of an event can aid in understanding of and the simulation of the event.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • define a problem.
  • analyze the problem.
  • seek multiple solutions to the problem.
  • evaluate possible solutions to the problem.
  • select a best solution to the problem.
  • seek feedback on the solution.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • problem-solving process
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the steps to the problem-solving process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • select and dissect a problem.
  • seek solutions.
  • select a best alternative.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • often there are multiple solutions to real
  • world problems.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce a multimedia artifact.
  • review artifacts created by others.
  • revise an artifact based on peer or teacher feedback.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • feedback is important in a design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a multimedia artifact.
  • critique the work of others.
  • revise their work based on feedback received.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • much like the writing process, design of a multimedia artifact nets the best results when creators have the opportunity to be given feedback and revise as needed.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design a function that demonstrates the removal of repetitive sequence of steps.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • function
  • abstraction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that a function can be called into a programming while abstracting out the details contained within the function.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a function that can be called into a programming while leaving out the details contained within the function.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • abstraction is a way of hiding the details of a complex function and being able to quickly make use of the complexity that has been hidden abstraction by calling in the function.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a properly functioning program using selection, iteration, abstraction, that initializes and updates at least two variables.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • selection
  • iteration
  • abstraction
  • initialize
  • variables
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to write a program that includes selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updates variables.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • write a program that includes foundational programming concepts
  • selection, iteration, abstraction, initialization, and updating variables.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • they have the ability to create and design programs they may have never considered themselves able to do so.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
23) Design a digital artifact to propose a solution for a content-related problem.

Example: Create a presentation outlining how to create a cost-efficient method to melt snow on roads during the winter.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design an artifact to propose a solution to an assigned or chosen content
  • related issue.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that often there exists many solutions to a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design an artifact to propose a solution to a problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the presentation of an artifact can be as important as the solution.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an artifact to solve a problem.
  • revise the created artifact once feedback is received from stakeholders.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • ideation
  • iteration
  • problem-solving process
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that problem solving is a process to find the best solution.
  • that through ideation and iteration, the final product or artifact may be a more polished or appropriate solution.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • gather initial data about a topic.
  • informally propose a solution.
  • gather feedback on informal proposal.
  • design a solution to a chosen problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • problem-solving is a process.
  • products or artifacts may undergo many revisions after data is reviewed and feedback is received.
Tags: computing devices, innovation, innovative, prototype
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://code.org/tos
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
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Author: Aimee Bates