ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Transfer of Energy 2: Electrochemistry

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Transfer of Energy 2: Electrochemistry

URL:

http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/the-transfer-of-energy-2/

Content Source:

Science NetLinks
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

This lesson is the second of a three-part series on energy transformation. All three lessons have the general purpose of increasing students' understanding of energy transfer, its role in chemical change, and the factors that can influence this change. This lesson is intended to increase students' understanding of electron transfer and its role in chemical changes. In groups, students will complete a lemon battery experiment. Students should work in pairs to make a single lemon battery. Then, the student pairs should form larger groups to test batteries comprised of more than one lemon. 

Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
3 ) Examine matter through observations and measurements to identify materials (e.g., powders, metals, minerals, liquids) based on their properties (e.g., color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, solubility, density).


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.1: Objects and substances have properties. Weight (mass) and volume are properties that can be measured using appropriate tools.*

NAEP Statement::
P4.3: Matter exists in several different states; the most common states are solid, liquid, and gas. Each state of matter has unique properties. For instance, gases are easily compressed while solids and liquids are not. The shape of a solid is independent of its container; liquids and gases take the shape of their containers.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Scale, Proportion, and Quantity
Disciplinary Core Idea: Matter and Its Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • color
  • hardness
  • reflectivity
  • electrical conductivity
  • thermal conductivity
  • response to magnetic forces
  • solubility
  • density
  • measurement (quantitative and qualitative)
  • data
  • observable properties
  • standard units
  • conductors
  • nonconductors
  • magnetic
  • nonmagnetic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Materials have different properties-color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity thermal conductivity, solubility, and density.
  • Measurements of a variety of properties can be used to identify materials.
  • Measurements should be made in standard units (e.g., grams & liters).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify the phenomenon through observations about materials, including color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, and solubility.
  • Identify the evidence and collect data about the observed objects in standard units (e.g., grams, liters).
  • Collaboratively plan the investigation.
  • Identify materials based on their properties.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities of materials such as weight, time, temperature, and volume. These measurements will assist in the identification of the materials ( e.g. powders, metals, minerals, and liquids).
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Matter and Interactions

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.5.3- Classify materials (e.g., powders, metals, minerals, liquids) based on their properties (e.g., color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, solubility, density).


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 8
Physical Science
7 ) Design, construct, and test a device (e.g., glow stick, hand warmer, hot or cold pack, thermal wrap) that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical reactions (e.g., dissolving ammonium chloride or calcium chloride in water) and modify the device as needed based on criteria (e.g., amount/concentration, time, temperature).*

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Matter and Its Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Design a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical reactions.
  • Construct a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical reactions.
  • Test a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical reactions.
  • Modify the device as needed based on criteria.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Design
  • Construct
  • Test
  • Modify
  • Device (e.g., glow stick, hand warmer, hot or cold pack, thermal wrap)
  • Engineering
  • Engineering Design
  • Process
  • Temperature
  • Exothermic (release thermal energy)
  • Endothermic (absorb thermal energy
  • Thermal energy
  • Chemical reactions (e.g., dissolving calcium chloride in water)
  • Criteria (e.g., amount/concentration, time, temperature)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Engineering is a systematic and often iterative approach to designing objects, processes, and systems to meet human needs and wants.
  • The Engineering Design Process (EDP) is a series of steps engineers use to guide them as they solve problems.
  • The EDP may include the following cyclical steps: ask, imagine, plan, create, and improve.
  • In chemical reactions, the atoms that make up the original substances are regrouped into new substances with different properties.
  • Chemical reactions can release thermal energy or store thermal energy. Criteria are requirements for successful designs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Design and construct a solution to a problem that requires either heating or cooling.
  • Describe the given criteria and constraints.
  • Test the solution for its ability to solve the problem via the release or absorption of thermal energy to or from the system.
  • Use the results of the tests to systematically determine how well the design solution meets the criteria and constraints, and which characteristics of the design solution performed the best.
  • Modify the design of the device based on the results of iterative testing, and improve the design relative to the criteria and constraints.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Some chemical reactions release energy, others store energy.
  • The transfer of energy can be measured as energy flows through a designed or natural system.
  • A solution needs to be tested, and then modified on the basis of the test results, in order to improve it.
  • Although one design may not perform the best across all tests, identifying the characteristics of the design that performed the best in each test can provide useful information for the redesign process - that is, some of the characteristics may be incorporated into the new design.
  • The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Experimenting with Mixtures, Compounds, and Elements

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.8.7- Critique objects or materials used to minimize or maximize thermal energy transfer (e.g., gloves, insulated hot pad, foam cup).


Tags: chemical, energy, energy transformation, reaction, substance, temperature
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://www.aaas.org/terms-of-use
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Stephanie Carver