ALEX Classroom Resource

  

The Life and Music of Celia Cruz

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

The Life and Music of Celia Cruz

URL:

https://amhistory.si.edu/celiacruz/printable/downloads/PDF/Autobiography%20though%20Objects.Kto4.pdf

Content Source:

Smithsonian
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze primary sources relating to Celia Cruz. Then, students will tell their own story using objects that are meaningful to them. 

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
34 ) Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. [SL.1.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.34- Describe familiar people, places, things, and events when communicating.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.3.3]

a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.3.3a]

b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. [W.3.3b]

c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. [W.3.3c]

d. Provide a sense of closure. [W.3.3d]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.3.24- Compose narrative texts by introducing characters or a narrator, organizing events in sequence, and providing an ending related to the event sequence.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
5 ) Identify historical events and celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Black History Month (Alabama)

•  Differentiating between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources
Example: fictional version of Pocahontas compared to an authentic historical account

Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Black History Month).
  • Identify historical events within the understand fiction and nonfiction text about historical events within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Ruby Bridges).
  • Identify fact as information provided through primary and secondary sources.
  • Identify fiction as stories that are created and passed down through history that are not based on factual information from primary and secondary sources.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • differentiate
  • identify
  • fact
  • fiction
  • celebrations
  • historical events
  • primary sources
  • secondary sources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The importance of celebrations and events in the local. community and throughout Alabama.
  • The purpose of primary and secondary sources.
  • Techniques to differentiate between fact and fiction.
  • Vocabulary: fact, fiction, celebrations, historical events, primary sources, secondary sources
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify, discuss, and list celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Differentiate between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama such as the Selma Bridge Crossing, Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Black History Month.
  • Primary and secondary sources are an important way to differentiate between fact and fiction.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.1.5- Engage in class conversations about Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Black History Month.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 3
Geographic and Historical Studies: People, Places, and Regions
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Unpacked Content
Strand: History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Interpret legends, stories, and songs to identify the contributions each made to the development of the cultural history of the United States.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • interpret
  • legends
  • stories
  • songs
  • contributed
  • development
  • cultural history
  • tall tales
  • folk heroes
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The purpose and essential elements of legends, stories, and songs.
  • Examples of legends, stories, and songs that contributed to United States' cultural history including American Indian Legends, African American Stories, Tall Tales and stories of Folk Heroes.
  • Vocabulary: legends, stories, songs, cultural history.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret legends, stories, and songs.
  • Identify the purpose and essential elements of legends, stories, and songs.
  • Identify the contribution that specific legends, stories, and songs had on the development of cultural history of the United States.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are legends, stories, and songs that have contributed to the development of the cultural history of the United States.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.3.11- Compare documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs and explain how they are used to reconstruct the past.


Tags: Celia Cruz, primary sources
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Ginger Boyd