ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Slavery

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Slavery

URL:

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/slavery/joKWkxrJJ1j8bCAd#r

Content Source:

Smithsonian
Type: Informational Material

Overview:

This is a collection of photographs and documents that can be used to help students create a drawing or painting to portray the pain of slavery. Students may also write an essay based on a first-person account looking through the eyes of a slave.  

Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
7 ) Explain reasons for Alabama's secession from the Union, including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements.

•  Identifying Alabama's role in the organization of the Confederacy, including hosting the secession convention and the inauguration ceremony for leaders
•  Recognizing Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy
•  Interpreting the Articles of the Confederation and the Gettysburg Address
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the reasons for Alabama's secession from the Union, including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • secession
  • Union
  • sectionalism
  • slavery
  • states' rights
  • Confederacy
  • inauguration
  • ceremony
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The reasons Alabama seceded from the Union including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements. Alabama played an important role in forming the Confederacy.
  • Montgomery was the first capital of the Confederacy.
  • The Articles of Confederation served as a basis for the Constitution of the Confederacy.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain reasons for Alabama's secession from the Union, including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements.
  • Analyze Alabama's role in the organization of the Confederacy, including hosting the secession convention and the inauguration ceremony for leaders.
  • Identify Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy.
  • Interpret the Articles of the Confederation and the Gettysburg Address as primary documents.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Economic and political disagreements led to Alabama's secession from the Union and Alabama played a major role in the creation of the Confederacy.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.7- Identify the concept of separation; recognize reasons why Alabama seceded (separated) from the Union.
SS.AAS.4.7a- Engage students in a conversation that described the first form of government in the United States which was the Articles of Confederation and why this form of government did not last.
SS.AAS.4.7b- Identify who wrote the Gettysburg Address and what it means.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify and explain the causes of the Civil War, including issues of states' rights, conflicts regarding slavery, important events, regional differences, and social, economic, and political conditions.
  • Describe Alabama's role in the Civil War.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Civil War
  • Missouri Compromise
  • insurrection
  • opposition
  • rebellion
  • personalities
  • political conditions
  • confederacy
  • secession
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Causes of the Civil War, including issues of states' rights and slavery.
  • The importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860.
  • Key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler.
  • Social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War.
  • Alabama's role in the Civil War (Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate key places and events on a physical and political map.
  • Identify and analyze the causes of political conflict Identify key people and explain their role throughout the Civil War.
  • Describe and draw conclusions about the war affected the citizens of the United States.
  • Interpret and define the role of Alabama in the Civil War.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many factors that led to the Civil War.
  • Key people and ordinary citizens contributed to and were impacted by the Civil War.
  • Alabama responded to, participated in, and was impacted by the Civil War.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.11 Define civil war; recognize one or more key figures of the Civil War, including Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis; label a map of the United States with Southern and Northern states involved in the Civil War.
SS.AAS.5.11a - Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War. Example: Montgomery was the first Confederate capitol.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
13 ) Summarize major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism, including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession
•  Describing tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861
•  Analyzing the formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the causes for increasing sectionalism in the United States prior to the Civil War, including legislative, judicial, social, political, and economic causes.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • legislation
  • act
  • secession
  • annexation
  • cession
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision.
  • Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton.
  • Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession.
  • Tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861.
  • The formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States.
Skills:
Students are able to
  • Summarize major legislation and court decision from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism.
  • Describe Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including the participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton.
  • Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism.
  • Describe tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861.
  • Analyze the formation of the Republican party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln.
  • Explain the significance of the 36'30 parallel in relation to the Missouri Compromise, Sectionalism, and Manifest Destiny.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important events that led to increased sectionalism, including legislation and court decisions, the role of new land acquisition and the spread of slavery into new territories, and these issues that led to the formation of the Republican Party.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.13- Define sectionalism; recognize major legislation and court decisions that increased sectional tensions prior to the Civil War.


Tags: slavery
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Author: Ginger Boyd