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Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 5 Course D Lesson 13: Conditionals With Cards (2018)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 5 Course D Lesson 13: Conditionals With Cards (2018)

URL:

https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursed/13/

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

This lesson demonstrates how conditionals can be used to tailor a program to specific information. We don’t always have all of the information we need when writing a program. Sometimes you will want to do something different in one situation than in another, even if you don't know what situation will be true when your code runs. That is where conditionals come in. Conditionals allow a computer to make a decision, based on the information that is true any time your code is run.

One of the best parts of teaching conditionals is that students already understand the concept from their everyday lives.

This lesson merges computer science into the real world by building off of students ability to tell if a condition is true or false. Students will learn to use if statements to declare when a certain command should be run, as well as if/else statements to declare when a command should be run and what do run otherwise. Students may not recognize the word conditionals, but most students will understand the idea of using "if" to make sure that some action only occurs when it is supposed to.

Students will be able to:
- define circumstances when certain parts of a program should run and when they shouldn't.
- determine whether a conditional is met based on criteria.
- traverse a program and predict the outcome, given a set of input.

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Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
2) Analyze a given list of sub-problems while addressing a larger problem.

Example: Problem - making a peanut butter sandwich; sub-problem - opening jar, finding a knife, getting the bread.
Problem - design and share a brochure; sub-problem - selecting font, choosing layout.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • analyze a given list of sub-problems while addressing a larger problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • sub-problem
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies for analyzing sub-problems from a given list for a larger problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • analyze given lists of sub-problems while addressing a larger problem.
  • identify the sub-problems for a larger problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • larger problems have sub-problems.
  • it can be easier to solve a large problem if you identify smaller sub-problems to tackle or solve.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
3) Explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.

Example: Multiple paths exist to get home from school; one may be a shorter distance while one may encounter less traffic.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • solution
  • sub-problem
  • problem
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
  • techniques to explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify different solutions for the same problem or sub-problem.
  • explain that these solutions exist.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • multiple solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
4) Examine logical reasoning to predict outcomes of an algorithm.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • examine logical reasoning.
  • predict the possible outcomes of an algorithm.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • logical reasoning
  • outcome
  • algorithm
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • to apply logical reasoning when predicting outcomes of algorithms.
  • strategies to examine logical reasoning to predict outcomes of an algorithm.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • determine possible outcomes of an algortihm.
  • recognize that an algorithm can have multiple outcomes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • logical reasoning is necessary when predicting outcomes of an algorithm.
  • algorithms can have multiple outcomes.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
23) Implement the design process to solve a simple problem.

Examples: Uneven table leg, noise in the cafeteria, tallying the collection of food drive donations.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • implement the design process to solve a simple problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • implement
  • design process
  • problem
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the steps in the design process are to define the problem, research the problem, brainstorm and analyze ideas, imagine solutions, build a prototype and test it, and make improvements.
  • how to implement the design process to solve a simple problem.
  • how to identify a simple problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the steps in the design process.
  • apply the design process to a simple problem.
  • implement the steps in the design process to solve a simple problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the steps in the design process are to define the problem, research the problem, brainstorm and analyze ideas, imagine solutions, build a prototype and test it, and make improvements.
Tags: coding, conditionals, if, ifelse, unplugged
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://code.org/tos
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
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Author: Aimee Bates