ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 5 Course D Lesson 14: If/Else With Bee (2018)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 5 Course D Lesson 14: If/Else With Bee (2018)

URL:

https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursed/14/

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Up until this point, students have been writing code that executes exactly the same way each time it is run - reliable, but not very flexible. In this lesson, your class will begin to code with conditionals, allowing them to write code that functions differently depending on the specific conditions the program encounters.

After being introduced to conditionals in "Conditionals with Cards", students will now practice using them in their programs. The if / else blocks will allow for a more flexible program. The bee will only collect nectar if there is a flower or make honey if there is a honeycomb. Students will also practice and recognize a connection between if / else blocks and while loops in this set of puzzles.

Students will be able to:
- translate spoken language conditional statements into a program.
- solve puzzles using a combination of looped sequences and conditionals.

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Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
3) Explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.

Example: Multiple paths exist to get home from school; one may be a shorter distance while one may encounter less traffic.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • solution
  • sub-problem
  • problem
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
  • techniques to explain that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify different solutions for the same problem or sub-problem.
  • explain that these solutions exist.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • multiple solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
4) Examine logical reasoning to predict outcomes of an algorithm.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • examine logical reasoning.
  • predict the possible outcomes of an algorithm.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • logical reasoning
  • outcome
  • algorithm
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • to apply logical reasoning when predicting outcomes of algorithms.
  • strategies to examine logical reasoning to predict outcomes of an algorithm.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • determine possible outcomes of an algortihm.
  • recognize that an algorithm can have multiple outcomes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • logical reasoning is necessary when predicting outcomes of an algorithm.
  • algorithms can have multiple outcomes.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • test a given program in a block
  • based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.
  • debug a given program in a block
  • based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.
  • collaborate with others.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • test
  • debug
  • program
  • block-based visual programming environment
  • arithmetic operators
  • conditionals
  • repetition
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies for debugging a given program.
  • arithmetic operators create a single numerical solution from multiple oprations.
  • conditionals are "if, then" statements that direct the program.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • test a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.
  • debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a given program must be tested and debugged to run correctly.
  • block-based visual programming uses arithemetic operators, conditionals, and repetition to function.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
23) Implement the design process to solve a simple problem.

Examples: Uneven table leg, noise in the cafeteria, tallying the collection of food drive donations.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • implement the design process to solve a simple problem.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • implement
  • design process
  • problem
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the steps in the design process are to define the problem, research the problem, brainstorm and analyze ideas, imagine solutions, build a prototype and test it, and make improvements.
  • how to implement the design process to solve a simple problem.
  • how to identify a simple problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify the steps in the design process.
  • apply the design process to a simple problem.
  • implement the steps in the design process to solve a simple problem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the steps in the design process are to define the problem, research the problem, brainstorm and analyze ideas, imagine solutions, build a prototype and test it, and make improvements.
Tags: bee, coding, conditionals, else, if, maze
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates