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Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 18: For Loop Fun (2018)

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 18: For Loop Fun (2018)

URL:

https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/18/

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

We know that loops allow us to do things over and over again, but now we’re going to learn how to use loops that have extra structures built right in. These new structures will allow students to create code that is more powerful and dynamic.

At this point, students have become masters of loops. Today, they will learn about another loop commonly used in programming. The for loop repeats commands a certain number of times but also keeps track of the values it is iterating over. For example, a for loop that begins at 4, ends with 8, and has a step value of 1 will repeat 4 times, but the values 4, 5, 6, and 7 will also be captured for use elsewhere. Using this structure with variables can create some pretty fantastic programs. Today, students will simply be learning the basics of a for loop before diving into programming with them next time!

Students will be able to:
- determine starting value, stopping value, and stepping value for a `for` loop.
- illustrate the counter values hit each time through a for loop during runtime.

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Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create a working program in a block
  • based visual programming environment.
  • create a program in a block
  • based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators such as AND, OR, and NOT.
  • create a program in a block
  • based visual programming environment using conditionals such as IF, THEN, and/or ELSE.
  • create a program in a block
  • based visual programming environment using repetition or loops.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • program
  • block-based visual programming
  • environment
  • arithmetic operators
  • conditionals
  • repetition
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment.
  • reasons for using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs make more operations possible and can reduce the complexity or length of code.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
7) Identify variables.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify variables in computing and other subject areas.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • variable
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • a variable is a factor in a program or problem that is likely to change.
  • how to identify variables.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify variables.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • variables are a part of an algorithm or problem that are likely to change.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • starting value
  • execution of programs
  • initial value
  • updating variables
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that for a program to run properly, the starting value may need to be set when the program begins.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain a scenario in which starting value is important to a program.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.
Tags: debug, decompose, for loops, loops, patterns, problem solving, programming, sequence, unplugged, variable
License Type: Custom Permission Type
See Terms: https://code.org/tos
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates