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Computer Science Principles Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 8: The Internet Is for Everyone (2018)

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Title:

Computer Science Principles Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 8: The Internet Is for Everyone (2018)

URL:

https://curriculum.code.org/csp-18/unit1/8/

Content Source:

Code.org
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

This lesson sets the stage for why we want to learn about how the Internet works. First, students share what they currently know about how the Internet works through a KWL activity. Then, students watch a short video that introduces Vint Cerf and the Internet at a high level. Students skim a memo written to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) by Vint Cerf in 2002 entitled “The Internet is for Everyone”, which calls out a series of threats to the prospect that the Internet should be an open, easily and cheaply accessible resource for everyone on the planet. Finally, we foreshadow the practice of PT at the end of the unit. Many of the questions and challenges raised by Vint Cerf still apply today, and students will be asked to research and present on one for the Practice PT.

The purpose of this lesson is to set up and motivate students to be receptive to learning about some of the technical aspects of how the Internet functions. We want the message to be clear that a huge part of being able to solve these problems, or even to function as an informed citizen, is to be educated about how the Internet actually works as a system that is built, engineered, and maintained by people.

It is both interesting and important to know that the protocols or rules by which Internet traffic is governed are not owned or controlled by any government or business (at the moment). It’s a group of well-meaning citizen-engineers dedicated to keeping the Internet free, open and robust for all.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is the group of mostly volunteer citizens that proposes and develops all of the standards and protocols that exist on the Internet. Request for Comments (RFC) documents, like the one we use in the lesson, is how these standards and protocols are defined and published for all to see on the IETF website. They are some of the best-written technical documents in existence.

And with a little background in how bits work, what’s necessary for protocols to work when bits are transferred over wires, they are relatively accessible reading. Here’s the full set: https://www.ietf.org/rfc.html. RFC 000 (the first one) is related to what we ask students to do in the next several lessons.

Students will be able to:
- connect a personal experience to one challenge related to the idea that "The Internet is for Everyone".
- cite one example of how computing has a global effect -- both beneficial and harmful -- on people and society.
- explain that the Internet is a distributed global system that works on shared and open protocols.

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Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • demonstrate personal safe use of technology.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to safely use digital devices.
  • that failure to use digital devices safely can have an impact on access at school as well as the protection of personal data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify personal safe use of digital devices.
  • demonstrate personal safe use of digital devices.
  • apply personal safe use of digital devices.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • it is important to protect personal data when sharing information on the internet.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • net neutrality
  • hacking
  • intellectual property
  • piracy plagiarism
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Tags: IETF, internet, net neutrality, research, unplugged
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates