ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Exploring Irony in the Conclusion of "All Quiet on the Western Front"

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Exploring Irony in the Conclusion of "All Quiet on the Western Front"

URL:

http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/exploring-irony-conclusion-quiet-994.html

Content Source:

ReadWriteThink
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

All Quiet on the Western Front ends with a startling and ironic conclusion. Following a chapter that begins with talk of the anticipated armistice, the novel's final short paragraphs unemotionally state that Paul, the protagonist, is killed on a day army reports described as "all quiet on the western front." This ending introduces students to situational irony. After discussing the definition and several examples of situational irony, students explore the novel's concluding passage. Students next choose a possible alternate ending for the book that could still be an example of situational irony. They then retitle the book and rewrite its ending, maintaining the original ironic tone and weaving their new title into the ending as Remarque does. Finally, students design new, symbolic covers for the book, which feature their new titles.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
5 ) Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. [RL.9-10.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
24 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-9.) [W.9-10.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 10
5 ) Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. [RL.9-10.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 10
9 ) By the end of Grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the Grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.9-10.10]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 10
25 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-10.) [W.9-10.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 11
23 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-11.) [W.11-12.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 12
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.12.1- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze stories, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 12
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.12.3- Describe how characters interact and develop in a story; identify the setting of a story; identify the problem in a story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 12
6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.11-12.6]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Cognitive Target::
Consider text(s) critically to analyze the point of view used by the author.
NAEP Descriptor::
Integrate information to explain a change in story character's perspective.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize paraphrase of story character's feelings.

NAEP Descriptor::
Explain author's use of story element to convey character's feeling. (Full Comprehension)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret story description to explain character's action.

NAEP Descriptor::
Explain difference between two characters' points of view.

NAEP Descriptor::
Explain author's use of setting to reveal character with support example.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 12
9 ) By the end of Grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.11-12.10]

Tags: All Quiet on the Western Front, alternate ending, Book Cover Creator, Book Cover Guide, CD Creator, design, DVD Creator, Erich Maria Remarque, illustrations, irony
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Author: Cassie Raulston