ALEX Classroom Resource

  

From Quantitative to Qualitative: Writing Descriptions of Data From Tables

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

From Quantitative to Qualitative: Writing Descriptions of Data From Tables

URL:

http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/from-quantitative-qualitative-writing-31069.html

Content Source:

ReadWriteThink
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Academic writing tasks often require students to use words to describe quantitative data found in tables, charts, or graphs. This lesson plan integrates quantitative reasoning and critical thinking with opportunities for writing as students examine a table with numerical data and then analyze the content, language, and organization of a verbal description of the same data.  Students then write and evaluate their own descriptions of data from tables. The lesson's discourse-based approach to language choices aims to raise students' awareness about verb tense selection and reasons for shifting tenses.

Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.9.10- Answer who, what, when, where, and why questions to analyze informational text, using textual evidence and inferences as support.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
20 ) Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [W.9-10.1]

a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. [W.9-10.1a]

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. [W.9-10.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. [W.9-10.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. [W.9-10.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.9-10.1e]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.9.20- Compose an argument to support a claim by stating a claim, providing facts or reasons supporting the claim, and providing an appropriate conclusion related to the stated argument.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 9
27 ) Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. [W.9-10.8]

Tags: Compare and Contrast Map, quantitative, tenses, verbs, writing
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Author: Cassie Raulston