ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Human Computer Interaction

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Human Computer Interaction

URL:

https://csfieldguide.org.nz/en/chapters/human-computer-interaction/

Content Source:

Other
CS Field Guide
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

People often become frustrated with computers and other digital devices. At some point when using these devices, you are likely to become annoyed that the system did something you didn't want it to do, or you can't figure out how to get the computer to do what you want, but why is that? Humans made computers, so why are computers often so frustrating for humans to use?

Human-computer interaction (HCI) is about trying to make programs useful, usable, and accessible to humans. It goes way beyond choosing layouts, colors, and fonts for an interface. It's strongly influenced by the psychology of how people interact with digital devices, which means understanding many issues about how people behave, how they perceive things, and how they understand things so that they feel that a system is working to help them and not hinder them. By understanding HCI, developers are more likely to create software that is effective and popular. If you ask people if they have ever been frustrated using a computer system, you’ll probably get a clear message that HCI isn’t always done well.

This chapter explores user interfaces, usability, and overall user experience with technology. 

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
5) Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using current events.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use digital tools to create content as it relates to current events.
  • seek feedback to revise computational artifacts.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts for practical intent.
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts for personal expression.
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts to address a societal issue by using current events.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and develop computational artifacts using an iterative design process.
  • use current events to bring merit to computational artifacts.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • design should be an iterative process whereby the designer seeks feedback to improve upon his/her creation.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
10) Resolve or debug errors encountered during testing using iterative design process.

Examples: Test for infinite loops, check for bad input, check edge-cases.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • troubleshoot errors encountered during testing using an iterative design process.
  • resolve or debug errors encountered during testing using an iterative design process.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • debug
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • steps of the problem solving process.
  • how to identify errors in an iterative design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • review a process and identify errors in procedure.
  • rectify errors found in a process.
  • test resolution to verify that the process now runs as intended.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • errors in a process can prevent a solution.
  • resolving an error will allow the process to function as intended.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
38) Systematically design and develop programs for broad audiences by incorporating feedback from users.
Examples: Games, utilities, mobile applications.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design programs iteratively, with feedback from users.
  • develop programs iteratively, with feedback from users.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • it is vital to seek feedback from others on programs and products.
  • feedback can help make a program or product better.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and develop a program.
  • publish a program, seeking feedback.
  • make edits to a program based upon user feedback.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • when designing a program, it is important to receive input from your target audience to ensure your product meets their expectations or need.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
40) Use an iterative design process, including learning from mistakes, to gain a better understanding of a problem domain.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create, publish, seek feedback on, and revise artifacts.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that creating an artifact is an iterative process.
  • that feedback serves to make products better.
  • that mistakes are teaching tools that help determine how not to solve a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and publish.
  • process constructive feedback.
  • persevere through mistakes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • creating an artifact is an iterative process.
  • feedback serves to make products better.
  • mistakes are teaching tools that help determine how not to solve a problem.
Tags: error, feedback, prototype, refine, test, user experience, user input, user interface
License Type: Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
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  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates