ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Sorting Algorithms

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Sorting Algorithms

URL:

https://classic.csunplugged.org/sorting-algorithms/

Content Source:

Other
CS Unplugged
Type: Learning Activity

Overview:

Computers are often used to put lists into some sort of order, for example, names into alphabetical order, appointments or e-mail by date, or items in numerical order. Sorting lists helps us find things quickly, and also makes extreme values easy to see. If you sort the marks for a class test into numeric order, the lowest and highest marks become obvious.

If you use the wrong method, it can take a long time to sort a large list into order, even on a fast computer. Fortunately, several fast methods are known for sorting. In this activity, children will discover different methods for sorting and see how a clever method can perform the task much more quickly than a simple one.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
20) Compare and contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand which is better suited to the task.

Examples: Sorting alphabetically, finding a path across a cluttered room.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compare human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand whether human or computer is better suited to the task.
  • contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand whether human or computer is better suited to the task.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • human and computer relationship
  • human and computer performance
  • compare and contrast
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the similarities and differences in human/computer performance of similiar tasks.
  • the benefits and disadvantages of human/computer performances of similar tasks.
  • the characteristics of human performance/computer performance of tasks.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • compare and contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks.
  • to understand whether human or computer is better suited to the task.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • at times, human or computer may be better suited for a similar task.
  • there are similarities and differences in human and computer performance on similar tasks.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • gather data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.
  • organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods how to use various computing methods.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • gather data
  • organize data
  • computing methods
  • data visualization methods
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies to gather data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.
  • strategies to organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a variety of computing and data visualization methods can be used to answer a question.
  • there are strategies for gathering and organizing data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.
  • different solutions call for certain types of computing and data visualization.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm to solve a problem.
  • detect and debug logical errors within an algorithm.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • debug
  • detect
  • logical errors
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • an algorithm is a logical set of steps to solve a problem.
  • detecting and debugging logical errors within an algorithm will ensure the algorithm serves to solve a problem successfully.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • debugging an algorithm is searching for logical errors within the algorithm.
  • an algorithm is a set of steps to solve a problem.
  • how to create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
3) Create an algorithm that is defined by simple pseudocode.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create set of steps that is written in simple pseudocode.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • pseudocode
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • simple pseudocode resembles language used to communicate with computers.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create an algorithm that is written in simple pseudocode.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • an algorithm that is written in simple pseudocode is similar to an algorithm written using a programming language.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 6
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • find algorithms that demonstrate the three basic programming structures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
algorithm sequence selection iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • differences between the three basic programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the differences in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • differences exist in sequencing, selection, and iteration.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create an algorithm using one of the three basic programming structures: sequencing, selections, or iterations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • algorithm
  • sequence
  • selection
  • iteration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use the programming structures to create algorithms and how many algorithms make use of all three programming structures.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and recognize various programming structures found in algorithms.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • each structure sequencing, selections, and iterations have a purpose.
Tags: algorithm, equation, expression, order, sort
License Type: Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates