ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Someone Could Listen

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Someone Could Listen

URL:

https://teachingprivacy.org/module-4-someone-could-listen/

Content Source:

Other
International Computer Science Institute
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

Unencrypted communication over the Internet works a lot like sending a postcard: it can be read by anybody along the delivery route. Communication is routed through intermediary computers and systems, which are connected to many more computers and systems. Encryption, or encoding information so it appears scrambled to anyone who doesn’t know the key, is a way to wrap a postcard in an envelope. While it can never be 100% secure, stronger encryption makes it harder for people to get to the contents.

The lesson elements in this module teach students about the privacy principle “Communication over a network, unless strongly encrypted, is never just between two parties”. They are designed to be independent and flexible, so you can incorporate them into any size lesson plan. Student resources are available at https://teachingprivacy.org/someone-could-listen/

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate how the multi-step, multi-party pathways of networked communication affect users’ privacy; students can identify and use more secure communication options.

Target Age: High school, college undergraduate.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Students can describe how intermediary devices, and the services that provide them, are involved in transmitting information from point A to point B on the Internet.
  2. Students can explain how the interconnected, many-layered structure of the Internet affects the security and privacy of online communication.
  3. Students can identify the difference between a private network and a shared network and can describe some of the potential risks of using a shared network.
  4. Students can describe how encryption decreases the chances of outside parties infiltrating private communications and accessing private information.
  5. Students can explain why their security depends (in part) on their own decisions and behavior.
  6. Students can give some examples of common encryption protocols, identify what layer of an electronic communication each of those protocols protects, and describe how they would verify that those protocols were being used.
Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • demonstrate personal safe use of technology.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to safely use digital devices.
  • that failure to use digital devices safely can have an impact on access at school as well as the protection of personal data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify personal safe use of digital devices.
  • demonstrate personal safe use of digital devices.
  • apply personal safe use of digital devices.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • it is important to protect personal data when sharing information on the internet.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • model behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.
a.
  • be able to identify user tracking methods and hazards.
b.
  • present strategies to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.
c.
  • explain how end-user license agreements and terms of service agreements serve to protect corporations not individuals.
  • explain the ramifications that may exist when one enters into a end-user licensing agreement or terms of use agreement.
  • explain how personal data may be shared by permissions agreed to in terms of service or end-user license agreements.
d.
  • explain online privacy.
  • explain personal security.
  • explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.
e.
  • identify physical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify legal consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify impacts of negative digital behaviors.
  • explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
  • assess when to apply various strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • ethics
  • digital world
a.
    cookies
  • virus
  • malware
  • packet sniffing
  • spyware
  • phishing
b.
  • browser history
c.
  • personal data
d.
    data mining
  • digital marketing
  • online wallets
  • personal information
  • data accessibility
  • passwords.
e.
  • cyberbullying
  • harassment
  • sexual communication
f.
  • online safety
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • safe, legal, and ethical behaviors for online behavior.
a.
  • tracking methods are often used to improve digital tools and advertising.
  • hazards exist when unknown entities have access to a user's digital habits.
b.
  • methods to counteract the use of tracking.
c.
  • that often, end-user licensing agreements (EULA) are often written to protect the entity that created the digital tool, rather than the user of the digital tool.
  • that EULAs and terms of service agreements can grant access to the user's personal data.
  • that personal data can include images, posts, personal information (phone number, address, birth date, access to friends), and browsing data.
d.
  • often there exists an inverse relationship between online privacy/personal security and convenience.
e.
  • that inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
f.
  • that negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • that some behaviors are illegal.
  • strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • interact digitally while exercising safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • identify tracking methods used to gather data.
  • identify hazards that exist when tracking methods are used.
b.
  • list techniques to avoid tracking.
  • apply techniques to avoid tracking.
c.
  • interpret the terms of EULAs and terms of service agreements.
  • make an educated decision to agree to EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • weigh the risks of using a digital tool to one's personal security.
  • identify potential risks to using various digital tools.
  • evaluate a digital tool's security.
e.
  • identify inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify negative digital behaviors.
  • share strategies to to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • because the Internet can be such a persisting environment, it is vital to interact with safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • entities use tracking methods to make products more appealing to their users.
  • hazards exists when tracking data can be tied to individual users.
b.
  • privacy can be violated when tracking is used.
  • techniques exist to mitigate the effects of tracking methods.
c.
  • nothing is free—you often give up data to use digital resources for no charge.
  • it is important to educate yourself on EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • free digital tools can compromise one's privacy and security.
  • it is important to be aware of what one is trading for use of a service.
e.
  • inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
  • consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors can have life-altering consequences.
f.
  • digital identity is tied to online digital behavior.
  • negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • some digital activity is illegal.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain how malware works.
  • describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.
Teacher Vocabulary:
personal data, malware, cyber attacks
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how malware works.
  • how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify when a computer issue is potentially caused by malware.
  • remove malware from a computing device.
  • explain ways to protect computing devices from malware.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • malware is harmful to computing devices and personal data.
  • software exists to remove malware from computing devices.
  • software exists to protect computing devices from a malware attack.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify security measures of a computer system.
  • compare various security measures of a computer system.
Teacher Vocabulary:
Cyber security, computer systems
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify security measures of a computing system.
  • how to evaluate usability, security, portability, or scalability of the security measures of a computing system.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify security measures of a computing system.
  • evaluate usability, security, portability, or scalability of the security measures of a computing system.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Usability, security, portability, or scalability are important features of computer security measures.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • net neutrality
  • hacking
  • intellectual property
  • piracy plagiarism
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research the impacts of actions taken in a digital environment.
  • evaluate strategies to protect their reputation in a digital environment.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital identity
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that often individuals are judged by their publicly visible online presence prior to meeting people in person.
  • that strategies exist to manage what is publicly posted online about you.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify both positive and negative posts online.
  • identify consequences associated with negative online posting.
  • manage their digital identity and minimize negative repercussions.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • data posted online may not remain private.
  • all data shared online will have some impact on one's digital identity.
  • one must be mindful of the data attached to one's digital identity.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
29) Summarize the role of compression and encryption in modifying the structure of digital artifacts and the varieties of information carried in the metadata of these artifacts.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • summarize the roles of compression and encryption.
  • examine how the structure of digital artifacts may be modified when compressed or encrypted.
  • describe the effects on the metadata of an artifact when compressing or encrypting the file.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compression
  • encryption
  • metadata
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that when a file is altered in any way, changes may be seen in the file metadata.
  • compression and encryption are two methods used when sharing data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the roles of compression and encryption.
  • summarize the effects of compression and encryption on the metadata of a digital artifact.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • any process applied to data has the potential to alter the structure of the data.
  • it is important to be aware of potential changes to data structure when electing to use a process.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
30) Evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.

Examples: Client server, peer-to-peer, cloud computing.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research methods of data organization and storage.
  • examine advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
  • evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • client server
  • peer-to-peer
  • cloud computing
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that many options exist for the storage and organization of data.
  • that selecting one storage option over another will have both advantages and disadvantages.
  • that it is important to understand the tradeoffs involved with selecting one method over another.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • research methods of data organization and storage.
  • examine advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
  • evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • how and where data is stored can affect how the data is accessed and/or processed.
  • how and where data is stored can affect the safety of that data.
  • it is important to carefully weigh how and where data is stored.
Tags: encryption, intermediary devices transmit, private network, protocol, shared network
License Type: Attribution
For full descriptions of license types and a guide to usage, visit :
https://creativecommons.org/licenses
Accessibility
Comments
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Aimee Bates