ALEX Classroom Resource

  

What Is Net Neutrality and What Will the Internet Look Like Without It?

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

What Is Net Neutrality and What Will the Internet Look Like Without It?

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/net-neutrality-kqed/the-lowdown-what-is-net-neutrality-and-what-will-the-internet-look-like-without-it/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Lesson/Unit Plan

Overview:

The policy of net neutrality prevents internet service providers (ISPs), like Verizon and AT&T, from slowing down the loading speeds of certain websites or creating “fast lanes” for sites that pay a fee. This policy will almost certainly be overturned by the Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission. This Lowdown lesson explores the pros and cons of net neutrality and examines the different ways lawmakers view internet service.

Content Standard(s):
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 7
10) Explain social engineering, including countermeasures, and its impact on a digital society.

Examples: Phishing, hoaxes, impersonation, baiting, spoofing.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • define social engineering in the context of information technology.
  • will identify methods to avoid being a victim of social engineering.
  • outline the impacts of social engineering on society.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • social engineering
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the importance of protecting personal data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify instances of social engineering and ways to avoid becoming a victim.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • personal data should be protected so that the information is not accessible by someone looking to exploit your information for personal gain.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
13) Evaluate the impact of digital globalization on public perception and ways Internet censorship can affect free and equitable access to information.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • evaluate the effects of internet censorship and global digitalization on the global society.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital globalization
  • Internet censorship
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • at one time, trades and goods were limited to mostly advanced economies; with changes in digital globalization, services and data are more readily available to all economies not affected by censorship.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify positive and negative implications of digital globalization and internet censorship.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • digital globalization has provided opportunities to countries less advanced than some larger countries.
  • internet censorship occurs locally and abroad.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 8
19) Critique the impacts of censorship as it impacts global society.

Example: Create a presentation outlining the social implications of limiting access to web content by favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • critique the impacts of censorship, highlighting global impacts of censorship.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • censorship
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • censorship is the omission, prohibition, or suppression of information.
  • when information is censored, truth is skewed.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • cite the implications of censorship.
  • communicate their opinions of the implications of censorship.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • censorship is the omission, prohibition, or suppression of information.
  • when information is censored, truth is skewed.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • model behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.
a.
  • be able to identify user tracking methods and hazards.
b.
  • present strategies to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.
c.
  • explain how end-user license agreements and terms of service agreements serve to protect corporations not individuals.
  • explain the ramifications that may exist when one enters into a end-user licensing agreement or terms of use agreement.
  • explain how personal data may be shared by permissions agreed to in terms of service or end-user license agreements.
d.
  • explain online privacy.
  • explain personal security.
  • explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.
e.
  • identify physical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify legal consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify impacts of negative digital behaviors.
  • explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
  • assess when to apply various strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • ethics
  • digital world
a.
    cookies
  • virus
  • malware
  • packet sniffing
  • spyware
  • phishing
b.
  • browser history
c.
  • personal data
d.
    data mining
  • digital marketing
  • online wallets
  • personal information
  • data accessibility
  • passwords.
e.
  • cyberbullying
  • harassment
  • sexual communication
f.
  • online safety
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • safe, legal, and ethical behaviors for online behavior.
a.
  • tracking methods are often used to improve digital tools and advertising.
  • hazards exist when unknown entities have access to a user's digital habits.
b.
  • methods to counteract the use of tracking.
c.
  • that often, end-user licensing agreements (EULA) are often written to protect the entity that created the digital tool, rather than the user of the digital tool.
  • that EULAs and terms of service agreements can grant access to the user's personal data.
  • that personal data can include images, posts, personal information (phone number, address, birth date, access to friends), and browsing data.
d.
  • often there exists an inverse relationship between online privacy/personal security and convenience.
e.
  • that inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
f.
  • that negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • that some behaviors are illegal.
  • strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • interact digitally while exercising safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • identify tracking methods used to gather data.
  • identify hazards that exist when tracking methods are used.
b.
  • list techniques to avoid tracking.
  • apply techniques to avoid tracking.
c.
  • interpret the terms of EULAs and terms of service agreements.
  • make an educated decision to agree to EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • weigh the risks of using a digital tool to one's personal security.
  • identify potential risks to using various digital tools.
  • evaluate a digital tool's security.
e.
  • identify inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify negative digital behaviors.
  • share strategies to to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • because the Internet can be such a persisting environment, it is vital to interact with safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • entities use tracking methods to make products more appealing to their users.
  • hazards exists when tracking data can be tied to individual users.
b.
  • privacy can be violated when tracking is used.
  • techniques exist to mitigate the effects of tracking methods.
c.
  • nothing is free—you often give up data to use digital resources for no charge.
  • it is important to educate yourself on EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • free digital tools can compromise one's privacy and security.
  • it is important to be aware of what one is trading for use of a service.
e.
  • inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
  • consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors can have life-altering consequences.
f.
  • digital identity is tied to online digital behavior.
  • negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • some digital activity is illegal.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 9-12
33) Evaluate the scalability and reliability of networks by describing the relationship between routers, switches, servers, topology, packets, or addressing, as well as the issues that impact network functionality.

Examples: Bandwidth, load, delay.

a. Explain the purpose of Internet Protocol addresses and how domain names are resolved to IP addresses through a Domain Name System server.

b. Understand the need for networking protocols and examples of common protocols.

Examples: HTTP, SMTP, and FTP

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • describe scalability and reliability of networks.
  • evaluate scalability and reliability of networks by describing the relationships of routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing.
  • discuss issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • explain the purpose of Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.
  • explain the use of a Domain Name System (DNS) server.
  • explain how the DNS server resolves the domain name to the IP address.
b.
  • explain the significance of network protocols.
  • identify examples of networking protocols.
  • explain the uses of and basic differences between various networking protocols.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • scalability
  • reliability
  • bandwidth
  • load
  • delay
  • fault tolerance
  • redundancy
  • latency
a.
  • domain name
  • Domain Name System (DNS) server
  • IP address
  • DNS name resolution
b.
  • networking protocols
  • layers
  • packets
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing affect scalability and reliability of networks.
  • how to describe the issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • that the DNS server function is to turn a user
  • friendly domain name into an IP address that machines use to identify each other on a network.
  • that the DNS server manages a database that maps domain names to IP addresses.
  • the typical format of an IP address.
  • computers communicate the IP address in binary form.
b.
  • that networking protocols are formal standards and policies that include procedures, formats and rules the define how two or more devices will communicate over a network.
  • there are several broad types of networking protocols including network communication protocols such as TCP/IP and HTTP, networking security protocols such as HTTPS and SSL, and network management protocols such as SNMP and ICMP.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • describe the relationships of routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing.
  • describe scalability and reliability of networks.
  • describe issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • explain the purpose of IP addresses.
  • identify what a typical IP address look like.
  • explain the difference between IP addresses expressed in decimal format and binary format.
  • explain how domain names are resolved to IP addresses through a DNS server.
b.
  • explain the significance of networking protocols.
  • provide examples of common networking protocols.
  • explain the uses of different networking protocols.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • scalability and reliability of networks are dependent on relationships between routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing, etc.
  • network functionality is impacted by bandwidth, load, delay, latency, firewalls, server capacity, etc.
a.
  • an Internet Protocol address is a unique identifying number for every machine on the internet.
  • the DNS server manages a massive database that maps user
  • friendly domain names to an IP address.
b.
  • networking protocols are needed to define rules for communication between network devices.
  • networking protocols include Internet protocols (IP, TCP, HTTP, FTP, SMTP, etc.), wireless network protocols (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, LTE), and network routing protocols (OSPF, BGP, etc.).
  • networking security protocols, such as HTTPS and SSL, provide security over network communications.
  • network management protocols, such as SNMP and ICMP, provide network governance and maintenance.
Tags: digital tools, internet, net neutrality
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Author: Stephanie Carver