ALEX Classroom Resource

  

Responsibility Launcher

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

Responsibility Launcher

URL:

https://www.icivics.org/node/3256/resource?referer=curriculum/play/all&page_title=Curriculum%20All%20Games

Content Source:

Other
iCivics
Type: Interactive/Game

Overview:

In this interactive game from iCivics, students can help remind citizens that their civic duties aren't just responsibilities, they help get things done! Students describe ways an individual can contribute to a school or community, identify ways that responsible community members exercise their rights, responsibilities, and roles, distinguish civic virtue, common courtesy, respect for person/property, civic and personal responsibility, and honesty as important characteristics for citizens to effectively participate in public life, and evaluate how civic and social duties address community needs and serve the public good. This game can be played when teaching a lesson on civic duties and responsibilities for reinforcement or after as an assessment.

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Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
10 ) Describe individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States.

Examples: individual—respect for rights of others, self-discipline, negotiation, compromise, fiscal responsibility

civic—respect for law, patriotism, participation in political process, fiscal responsibility

•  Differentiating rights, privileges, duties, and responsibilities between citizens and noncitizens
•  Explaining how United States' citizenship is acquired by immigrants
•  Explaining character traits that are beneficial to individuals and society
Examples: honesty, courage, compassion, civility, loyalty

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the rights, duties, and responsibilities of U.S. citizens, as well as paths to citizenship.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • responsibilities
  • duties
  • rights
  • privileges
  • citizen
  • alien
  • immigrants
  • naturalization
  • character
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The distinction between right, duties and responsibilities. There is a way for immigrants to become a citizen.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Cite primary source documents to provide evidence that an idea is a right guaranteed to citizens.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are rights, duties, responsibilities, and privileges of U.S. citizenship.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.10- Demonstrate that individuals have a responsibility to be good citizens and community members; identify the legal definition of a United States citizen and non-citizen.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 7
Civics
12 ) Describe how the United States can be improved by individual and group participation in civic and community activities.

•  Identifying options for civic and community action
Examples: investigating the feasibility of a specific solution to a traffic problem, developing a plan for construction of a subdivision, using maps to make and justify decisions about best locations for public facilities

•  Determining ways to participate in the political process
Examples: voting, running for office, serving on a jury, writing letters, being involved in political parties and political campaigns

Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain how participating in civic and community activities improves life in our community, state, and country.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • civic
  • community
  • political process
  • political participation
  • political parties
  • campaigns
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Individual citizens and community groups can improve their community by actively participating in the political process. Examples of participating in the political process include voting; running for office; writing letters to office holders; being involved in political parties and political campaigns.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • List ways to actively participate in the political process and in their community.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Individual and community participation has the potential to improve the U.S. society.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.7.12- Recognize opportunities for participation in community and civic action.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 12
United States Government
11 ) Evaluate constitutional provisions of the legislative branch of the government of the United States, including checks by the legislative branch on other branches of government.

•  Comparing rules of operations and hierarchies of Congress, including roles of the Speaker of the House, the Senate President Pro Tempore, majority and minority leaders, and party whips
•  Identifying the significance of Congressional committee structure and types of committees
•  Tracing the legislative process, including types of votes and committee action, from a bill's presentation to presidential action
Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Government
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compare the composition and organization of both bodies of the U.S. Congress as well as the roles and responsibilities of congressional leadership.
  • Explain the formal and informal process by which a bill becomes a law.
  • Identify the key constitutional provisions of the legislative branch including power and limitations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • bicameral
  • Senator
  • Representative
  • checks and balances
  • congressional committee
  • Speaker of the House
  • Senate President Pro Tempore
  • majority/minority leader
  • majority/minority whip
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Powers granted to the legislative branch by the Constitution as well as limitations placed on the legislative branch by other branches.
  • Roles and responsibilities of various offices in the U.S. Congress, including committee framework.
  • Process by which a bill becomes a law including informal influences on the outcome of a bill's passing and composition.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Classify powers of the legislative branch over other branches as well as checks on the legislative branch by other branches.
  • List in chronological order the steps by which a bill becomes a law while identifying at what points other factors may influence the ability of the bill to be passed, including lobbying efforts, as well as the composition of the bill, such as riders or amendment.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The constitutional framework of the legislative branch, as well as how informal processes and organizational considerations, have shaped the modern U.S. Congress.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.USG.AAS.12.11- Define legislative branch of government; identify the major roles and/or responsibilities of the legislative branch of government, recognize the legislative branch is made up of the House of Representatives and the Senate and identify the differences between them.
SS.USG.AAS.12.11a- List in chronological order the steps by which a bill becomes a law.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 12
United States Government
14 ) Describe the role of citizens in American democracy, including the meaning, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship; due process and other rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States; and participation in the election process.

•  Explaining how the balance between individual versus majority rule and state versus national authority is essential to the functioning of the American democratic society (Alabama)
Examples: majority rule and minority rights, liberty and equality, state and national authority in a federal system, civil disobedience and rule of law, freedom of the press, right to a fair trial, relationship of religion and government (Alabama)

Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Government
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Justify the means by which a citizen can shape the political process in America while giving consideration to other values and rights in the American political system.
  • Summarize what rights are given to US citizens by the Constitution and the limitations on these rights.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • value conflict
  • due process
  • majority rule
  • minority rights
  • civil disobedience
  • democratic society
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Expectations and responsibilities associated with U.S. citizenship. Rights afforded to U.S. citizens as found in the Bill of Rights, such as free exercise of religion and right to a fair trial.
  • Means of participation by citizens in the United States that shape the political process, such as voting and protesting.
  • How equally important American values and concepts, such as citizens' rights and the rule of law, can come into conflict amongst one another, such as national authority and state rights.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Critique the rights and responsibilities of citizens as they come into conflict with other constitutional rights and responsibilities of the American government.
  • Defend one perspective in a conflict amongst equally important American values or concepts.
  • Justify a means by which a citizen can influence the outcome of an election beyond voting.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Both rights and responsibilities are associated with American citizenship afforded to them by the American Constitution and the meaning of such rights is contested in certain circumstances.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.USG.AAS.12.14a- Understand that citizens have rights and responsibilities; recognize rights that citizens are guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 9-12
Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement
3 ) Compare civic responsibilities, individual rights, opportunities, and privileges of citizens of the United States to those of citizens of other nations.

Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe what rights, opportunities, responsibilities, and privileges they have within the United States.
  • Describe how citizenship in the United States differs from that of other countries.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compare/contrast
  • civic responsibility
  • individuals rights
  • civic/individual opportunity
  • civic/individual privilege
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The definition of a citizen varies amongst countries, including the rights and responsibilities of such.
  • The rights, opportunities, responsibilities, and privileges American citizens possess.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast the meaning of citizenship in the United States to other countries.
  • Identify examples of and differences between the meanings of a right, privilege, opportunity, and responsibility.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The role of a citizen differs amongst countries.
Tags: citizen, civic duties and responsibilities, constitution, democracy
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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AccessibilityAudio resources: includes a transcript or subtitles
Graphics: includes alt tags or long descriptions
Video resources: includes closed captioning or subtitles
Comments

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Author: Ginger Boyd