ALEX Classroom Resource

  

More, Fewer, Same

  Classroom Resource Information  

Title:

More, Fewer, Same

URL:

https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d9f8f4de-5a23-4fce-aad7-bb25b88dfe39/more-fewer-same/

Content Source:

PBS
Type: Audio/Video

Overview:

Students in kindergarten will not use greater than, less than, or equal symbols, but they do need to learn how to compare numbers. This video helps students learn how to compare groups that contain up to ten objects.

Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
6. Orally identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater/more than, less/fewer than, or equal/the same as the number of objects in another group, in groups containing up to 10 objects, by using matching, counting, or other strategies.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain and justify answers to questions such as "which group has more?" or "which group has less?".
  • Answer questions such as which group has more or less by matching, recognizing without counting (subitizing), or counting up to 10 objects.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Compare
  • Greater than
  • More than
  • Less than
  • Fewer than
  • Equal
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify which number is larger and which number is smaller.
  • number word sequence.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Count sequentially.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a set of objects is either greater than, less than, or equal to another set of objects.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.6.1: Define greater than, less than, and equal to.
M.K.6.2: Count to 20 by ones.
M.K.6.3: Count objects up to ten.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than".
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many."
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
  • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.
  • Recognize that numbers and numerals have meaning.
  • Recognize numerals 0 through 10.
  • Rote count to ten.
  • Communicate number words.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is more or less than (e.g., when the quantities are clearly different) or equal to the number of objects in another group.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: K
7. Compare two numbers between 0 and 10 presented as written numerals (without using inequality symbols).
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Justify their identification of the larger or smaller pair of numerals using a variety of strategies such as referring to their order in the counting sequence, modeling the quantities, and using relational thinking.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Relational thinking
  • Inequality symbols
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify which number is larger and which number is smaller with number 0 - 10.
  • number word sequence.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • count sequentially.
  • Apply strategies for comparing numbers.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • successive number names refer to quantities that are larger than the previous numbers in the counting sequence.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.K.7.1: Compare numbers 1 to 10 using objects.
M.K.7.2: Name numerals 1 to 10.
M.K.7.3: Identify numerals 1 to 10.
M.K.7.4: Count to 10 by ones.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
  • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than".
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
  • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
  • Understand the concept of size and amount.
  • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
  • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many."
  • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
  • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
  • Recognize less/fewer.
  • Recognize greater/more.
  • Recognize same/equal.
  • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.K.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is more or less than (e.g., when the quantities are clearly different) or equal to the number of objects in another group.


Tags: compare, comparing numbers, equal, greater thank, less than, numerals, objects
License Type: Custom Permission Type
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Partnered Event: ALEX Resource Development Summit
Accessibility
Comments

ALCOS 2019

6. Orally identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater/more than, less/fewer than, or equal/the same as the number of objects in another group, in groups containing up to 10 objects, by using matching, counting, or other strategies.
7. Compare two numbers between 0 and 10 presented as written numerals (without using inequality symbols).
  This resource provided by:  
Author: Michelle Frye
The event this resource created for:ALEX Resource Development Summit